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If I have code like so:

class X extends JFrame
{
X()
{
setLayout(new GridLayout(3,3));
JButton b = new JButton("A-ha");
/*I would like to add this button in the center of this grid (2,2)*/
//How can I do it?
}
};
share|improve this question
    
Is that essentially just one button with a large border? – colinjwebb May 12 '10 at 10:15
    
@colinjameswebb One button in the center of the panel. – There is nothing we can do May 12 '10 at 10:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As what I know, you have to fill all the previous cells before. So you need to add 4 components before you can add the center component. Hmm, it could be a better layoutmanager.

What are you trying to do? Maybe BorderLayout is what you are looking for?

share|improve this answer
    
God Almighty I'll be slagged by saying this but why is it that in java everything is so.... Why couldn't they provide a way in which I would be able to write add(button,(2,2)); Why? For God's sake, why? Another simplification for the famous "most common case"? – There is nothing we can do May 12 '10 at 10:15
    
Well, I don't know about the rest of the other developers, but I do not think that Java's strong point is in its GUI. – npinti May 12 '10 at 10:17
    
@Knowing me knowing you: I agree. – Jonas May 12 '10 at 10:18
    
@npinti: Java Swing can be a good choice if you want a cross platform GUI. – Jonas May 12 '10 at 10:52
    
Yes I know. But it seems that Java can give you quite a headache if you would like to do something that is a bit out of the box. – npinti May 12 '10 at 11:22

You might want to take a look at the GridBag Layout

share|improve this answer
    
Does GridBagLayout let's me do this? – There is nothing we can do May 12 '10 at 10:19
    
According to that tutorial, "You can set the following GridBagConstraints instance variables: gridx, gridy Specify the row and column at the upper left of the component. The leftmost column has address gridx=0 and the top row has address gridy=0. Use GridBagConstraints.RELATIVE (the default value) to specify that the component be placed just to the right of (for gridx) or just below (for gridy) the component that was added to the container just before this component was added. " Follow the links for more details :) – npinti May 12 '10 at 10:49

This centres vertically and horizontally

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Component;

import javax.swing.Box;
import javax.swing.BoxLayout;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;


public class centerbutton extends JFrame{
   public centerbutton(){
      setLayout(new BorderLayout());

      JPanel panel = new JPanel();
      JButton button = new JButton("A-ha!");
      button.setAlignmentX(
      Component.CENTER_ALIGNMENT);
      panel.setLayout(new BoxLayout(panel, BoxLayout.PAGE_AXIS));
      panel.add(Box.createVerticalGlue());
      panel.add(button);
      panel.add(Box.createVerticalGlue());

      getContentPane().add(panel);

      setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      new centerbutton();
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I basically stole it from answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090729150118AAHGvrI – colinjwebb May 12 '10 at 12:37

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