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We have two installations of DB2.

When defining a foreign key with a long name, it works fine on one instance, but not on the other (we get a SQL0107N Name too long - max length is 18).

What is causing this different behaviour? Is there a parameter we can change or is it version dependant?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

this seems to be version dependent. according to http://ptgmedia.pearsoncmg.com/images/0672326132/downloads/appd.pdf and http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/db2luw/v9/index.jsp?topic=/com.ibm.db2.udb.admin.doc/doc/r0001029.htm , the limits for referential constraint names for the 7, 8, and 9 version of db2 are as follows:

v7  8 bytes 
v8  128 bytes
v9  18 bytes

these limits cannot be changed. so Adhering to the most restrictive case can help you to design application programs that are easily portable.

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Thanks for the info. I thought we were both on v9, but it seems it's better to be cautious. – Thorsten May 12 '10 at 16:00

Take a look at following link:

http://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SSEPGG_9.7.0/com.ibm.db2.luw.sql.ref.doc/doc/r0001029.html?lang=en

I see that constraint name can be 128 and we use version 9.7 for LUW. So the 18 bytes of v9 is not correct. And I have been able to create a foreign key in the database with an effective length of 19 bytes for its name.

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It is typically better to describe or quote the relevant sections and post the link as a reference. This keeps the answer relevant even if the link is later broken. – cyroxis 12 hours ago

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