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I am using jQuery in conjunction with Symfony 1.3.2.

I have registered the form's submit button click event with jQuery, so that jQuery POSTs to the correct action at the server.

My code looks like this:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('#form_btn').click(function(){
     $.ajax( {'type': 'POST', 'url': '/form_handler.php' });
  });
});

However (perhaps unsurprisingly - since I did not send any data), at the server end, there are no POST variables and the form fields are not available.

For example:

$request->getParameter($this->form->getName());

returns null.

Does anyone know how I can POST a Symfony form using jQuery?

[Edit]

For those who may not be familiar with Symfony, what I am asking here is how to post form values using jQuery.

share|improve this question
    
You should have that on the form.submit action rather than the button.click of the button so if they hit enter in one of the inputs it will still work. –  SeanJA May 12 '10 at 15:27
    
@SeanjA: thanks for the info –  morpheous May 12 '10 at 15:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to add all the input fields from the form to the .ajax() call, something like

$.ajax({'type': 'POST', 'url': '...', 'data': form_data });

Where var form_data are the values of your input elements - see here on how to get them: Obtain form input fields using jQuery?

An example would be

var form_data = $('#myForm').serialize();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 .thanks for the quick response. I'm reading up the link you sent now –  morpheous May 12 '10 at 15:25
2  
var form_data = $('#myForm').serialize(); –  SeanJA May 12 '10 at 15:25
1  
Yes, you should use serialize() ... and an alternative in Symfony 1.3/1.4 is to use the sfJQueryReloadedPlugin which has a submit_to_remote method that handles Ajax form submission. I personally prefer writing it myself, as you're doing now. The plugin comes with some overhead. –  Tom May 13 '10 at 12:34

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