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So, I am writing code to parse and IP Address expression and turn it into a regular expression that could be run against and IP Address string and return a boolean response. I wrote the code in C# (OO) and it was 110 lines of code. I am trying to compare the amount of code and the expressiveness of C# to F# (I am a C# programmer and a noob at F#). I don't want to post both the C# and F#, just because I don't want to clutter the post. If needed, I will do so.

Anyway, I will give an example. Here is an expression:

192.168.0.250,244-248,108,51,7;127.0.0.1

I would like to take that and turn it into this regular expression:

((192\.168\.0\.(250|244|245|246|247|248|108|51|7))|(127\.0\.0\.1))

Here are some steps I am following:

Operations:

Break by ";" 192.168.0.250,244-248,108,51,7 127.0.0.1

Break by "." 192 168 0 250,244-248,108,51,7

Break by "," 250 244-248 108 51 7 Break by "-" 244 248

I came up with F# that produces the output. I am trying to forward-pipe through my operations listed above, as I think that would be more expressive. Can anyone make this code better? Teach me something :)

open System

let createItemArray (group:bool) (y:char) (items:string[]) = 
  [|
    let indexes = items.Length - 1
    let group = indexes > 0 && group
    if group then
      yield "("
    for i in 0 .. indexes do
      yield items.[i].ToString()
      if i < indexes then
        yield y.ToString()
    if group then
      yield ")"
  |] 

let breakBy (group:bool) (x:string) (y:char): string[] = 
  x.Split(y)
    |> createItemArray group y 

let breakItem  (x:string) (y:char): string[] = breakBy false x y
let breakGroup  (x:string) (y:char): string[] = breakBy true x y

let AddressExpression address:string = 
    let builder = new System.Text.StringBuilder "("
    breakGroup address ';'
    |> Array.collect (fun octet -> breakItem octet '.')
    |> Array.collect (fun options -> breakGroup options ',')
    |> Array.collect (fun (ranges : string) -> 
                            match (breakGroup ranges '-') with
                            | x when x.Length > 3
                              -> match (Int32.TryParse(x.[1]), Int32.TryParse(x.[3]))    with
                                  | ((true, a) ,(true, b))
                                      -> [|a .. b|]
                                          |> Array.map (int >> string)
                                          |> createItemArray false '-'
                                  | _ -> [|ranges|]
                            | _ -> [|ranges|]
                    )
    |> Array.iter (fun item ->
                    match item with
                    | ";" -> builder.Append ")|("
                    | "." -> builder.Append "\."
                    | "," | "-" -> builder.Append "|"
                    | _ -> builder.Append item
                    |> ignore
                  )
    builder.Append(")").ToString()

let address = "192.168.0.250,244-248,108,51,7;127.0.0.1"
AddressExpression address
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's mine in 63 lines of F# (including the one test case); it worked the first time, and feels pretty readable to me. It's a typical parser-followed-by-pretty-printer. What do we think?

type IPs = IP[]
and IP = IP of OrParts * OrParts * OrParts * OrParts
and OrParts = Or of Part[]
and Part = Num of int | Range of int * int

let Valid(x) = if x < 0 || x > 255 then failwithf "Invalid number %d" x

let rec parseIPs (s:string) =
    s.Split [|';'|] |> Array.map parseIP
and parseIP s =
    let [|a;b;c;d|] = s.Split [|'.'|]
    IP(parseOrParts a, parseOrParts b, parseOrParts c, parseOrParts d)
and parseOrParts s =
    Or(s.Split [|','|] |> Array.map parsePart)
and parsePart s =
    if s.Contains("-") then
        let [|a;b|] = s.Split [|'-'|]
        let x,y = int a, int b
        Valid(x)
        Valid(y)
        if x > y then failwithf "Invalid range %d-%d" x y
        Range(x, y)
    else
        let x = int s
        Valid(x)
        Num(x)

let rec printIPsAsRegex ips =
    let sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder()
    let add s = sb.Append(s:string) |> ignore
    add "("
    add(System.String.Join("|", ips |> Array.map printIPAsRegex))
    add ")"
    sb.ToString()
and printIPAsRegex (IP(a, b, c, d)) : string =
    let sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder()
    let add s = sb.Append(s:string) |> ignore
    add "("
    printPartsAsRegex add a
    add "."
    printPartsAsRegex add b
    add "." 
    printPartsAsRegex add c
    add "."
    printPartsAsRegex add d
    add ")"
    sb.ToString()
and printPartsAsRegex add (Or(parts)) =
    match parts with
    | [| Num x |] -> // exactly one Num
        add(string x)
    | _ ->
        add "("
        add(System.String.Join("|", parts |> Array.collect (function
                | Num x -> [| x |]
                | Range(x,y) -> [| x..y |])
            |> Array.map (fun x -> x.ToString())))
        add ")"

let Main() =
    let ips = parseIPs "192.168.0.250,244-248,108,51,7;127.0.0.1"
    printfn "%s" (printIPsAsRegex ips)
Main()                
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you forgot to escape your dots (using @"\."), but I like the approach. It's too bad that there doesn't seem to be an easy way to use Printf.bprintf here due to the top down nature of the problem, since potentially that could have been more readable than the sequence of add operations in your PrintIPAsRegex. –  kvb May 12 '10 at 16:32
    
Escaping: I was just going by the spec inferred by the OP's sample input/output. bprintf: yeah, maybe, I forgot it exists. –  Brian May 12 '10 at 16:53
    
Sorry, the slashes were in there. The editor was reading them as escaping characters :) I double-slashed them in my spec. If you look at my example code, I was escaping them. This looks good. I was trying to force my piping to much. I made that peg fit. :) –  Phobis May 12 '10 at 22:37

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