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I'm working on a controller that handles logins for a Web app. These logins will come from multiple clients but will all contain the same data. However, depending on the client, this data will be interpreted into common entities for our webapp differently.

For instance, we have a user code that gets sent in, and in one case we may use the first four digits of the code, and in another case 12 digits of the code to map to a field on a User entity.

Instead of handling this all in the controller and having big nasty if blocks of logic, I would like to use a pattern to handle how this information gets ingested into our application.

What are your opinions?

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My opinion is that you are likely to get a good answer to this question once you elaborate more clearly what you want to know. For example, you talk about a "user code", but you don't define what a user code is. –  Daniel Allen Langdon May 12 '10 at 16:51
    
I was hoping to keep this abstract by not spilling into those details too much. What I want to know, is if you have a controller that is responsible for ingesting and mapping identical data from multiple sources to entities in the Web app, and must handle the mapping of that data differently depending on the datasource, what type of pattern would be recommended. –  stevebot May 12 '10 at 16:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's hard to understand exactly what the problem is without knowing more about how your program currently works. However, if I understand correctly, you don't really need a 'pattern' as such.

I would simply refactor the "big nasty blocks of if logic" into a class that handles deciding what to do with the data. Perhaps something like this (PHP code):

class UserCodeHandler {

 private $userCode;
 private $client;

 public function __construct($userCode, $client) {

  $this->userCode = $userCode;
  $this->client = $client;
 }

 public function manipulateData() {

  switch ($this->client) {
   case 'clientA':
    $this->doSomething();
    break;
   case 'clientB':
    $this->doSomethingElse();
    break;
  }
 }

 private function doSomething() {
  //does stuff with first 4 digits of the user code.
 }

 private function doSomethingElse() {
  //does stuff with 12 digits of the user code.
 }
}

You can then use it like this:

$userCodeHandler = new UserCodeHandler($data, $client);
$userCodeHandler->manipulateData();

This will keep all of the conditional logic out of the controller and allow you to reuse the code in other controllers.

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Right, that's actually along the lines of my first thought. I just wanted to make an abstract handler with various implementations. I think this is the direction I will go unless anyone has any other recommendations. –  stevebot May 12 '10 at 18:25

The factory pattern suits the mentioned scenario. Using the factory pattern you can implement classes for additional client types in future without modifying the existing code.

class Client
{
    public static function factory($client_type)
    {
        $classname = 'Client_' . $client_type;

        return new $classname;
    }
}

class Client_TypeA
{
    public function doSomething()
    {
        // do something specific to TypeA clients
    }
}

class Client_TypeB
{
    public function doSomething()
    {
        // do something specific to TypeB clients
    }
}

$client = Client::factory('TypeA');
$client->doSomething();
share|improve this answer
    
This will not deal with the issue of having a chain of if ... else statements or a switch in the controller. In fact, the factory is not needed at all. You could implement classes for additional client types in the future without the factory, and it still won't require modification of the exisiting code. –  Peter Horne May 14 '10 at 20:45

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