Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the Hi/Lo algorithm?

I've found this in the NHibernate documentation (it's one method to generate unique keys, section 5.1.4.2), but I haven't found any good explanation of how does it work.

I know that Nhibernate handles it, and I don't need to know the inside, but I'm just curious.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 340 down vote accepted

The basic idea is that you have two numbers to make up a primary key- a "high" number and a "low" number. A client can basically increment the "high" sequence, knowing that it can then safely generate keys from the entire range of the previous "high" value with the variety of "low" values.

For instance, supposing you have a "high" sequence with a current value of 35, and the "low" number is in the range 0-1023. Then the client can increment the sequence to 36 (for other clients to be able to generate keys while it's using 35) and know that keys 35/0, 35/1, 35/2, 35/3... 35/1023 are all available.

It can be very useful (particularly with ORMs) to be able to set the primary keys on the client side, instead of inserting values without primary keys and then fetching them back onto the client. Aside from anything else, it means you can easily make parent/child relationships and have the keys all in place before you do any inserts, which makes batching them simpler.

share|improve this answer
9  
Are you saying that "low ranges" are coordinated within the client, while the "high sequence" corresponds to a DB sequence? –  Chris Noe Jun 30 '09 at 13:15
11  
Are the hi & lo values typically then composed into a single integer value, or as a two-part business key? –  Chris Noe Jun 30 '09 at 15:48
36  
like an IP address then - ICANN gives you a high 'network' number, you then have as many low 'host' numbers as you like, within the limit of the CIDR range you're given. –  gbjbaanb Aug 7 '09 at 14:19
4  
@Adam: Fundamentally, nothing - it's just potentially cheaper to increment one value (the "high" part) than to generate a bunch of keys. (It's potentially much cheaper in terms of data transfer - you can "reserve" a huge number of keys with minimal bandwidth.) –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '10 at 11:15
3  
@Adam: That's true if the keys are just numbers. Not so much for GUIDs :) But yes, in the case of simple numbers, any atomic "increment by a fixed amount" will do. That's effectively what hi-lo is doing, if you think of it as one number split into two sections. –  Jon Skeet Aug 9 '10 at 11:36
show 15 more comments

In addition to Jon's answer:

It is used to be able to work disconnected. A client can then ask the server for a hi number and create objects increasing the lo number itself. It does not need to contact the server until the lo range is used up.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Better than the Hi-Lo allocator, is the "Linear Chunk" allocator. This uses a similar table-based principle but allocates small, conveniently-sized chunks & generates nice human-friendly values.

create table KEY_ALLOC (
    SEQ varchar(32) not null,
    NEXT bigint not null,
    primary key (SEQ)
);

To allocate the next, say, 20 keys (which are then held as a range in the server & used as needed):

select NEXT from KEY_ALLOC where SEQ=?;
update KEY_ALLOC set NEXT=(old value+20) where SEQ=? and NEXT=(old value);

Providing you can commit this transaction (use retries to handle contention), you have allocated 20 keys & can dispense them as needed.

With a chunk-size of just 20, this scheme is 10x faster than allocating from an Oracle sequence, and is 100% portable amongst all databases. Allocation performance is equivalent to hi-lo.

Unlike Ambler's idea, it treats the keyspace as a contiguous linear numberline.

This avoids the impetus for composite keys (which were never really a good idea) and avoids wasting entire lo-words when the server restarts. It generates "friendly", human-scale key values.

Mr Ambler's idea, by comparison, allocates the high 16- or 32-bits, and generates large human-unfriendly key values as the hi-words increment.

Comparison of allocated keys:

Linear_Chunk       Hi_Lo
100                65536
101                65537
102                65538
.. server restart
120                131072
121                131073
122                131073
.. server restart
140                196608

I actually corresponded with Mr Ambler back in the 90's to suggest this improved scheme to him, but he was too stuck & obstinate to acknowledge the advantages & clear simplicity of using a linear number-line.

Design-wise, his solution is fundamentally more complex on the number-line (composite keys, large hi_word products) than Linear_Chunk while achieving no comparative benefit. His design is thus mathematically proven deficient.

share|improve this answer
    
Who is mister Ambler? –  Apocatastasis Oct 19 '13 at 18:51
    
Scott Ambler promotes a so-called "hi-lo" allocation strategy using 16- or 32-bit words. Here's his page: ambysoft.com/scottAmbler.html –  Thomas W Oct 19 '13 at 21:51
    
Nice post, but you're not answering the question. –  orbfish Jan 16 at 23:09
add comment

protected by Will Oct 13 '10 at 12:12

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.