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While debugging a crash, I came across this issue in some code:

int func()
{
    char *p1 = malloc(...);
    if (p1 == NULL)
        goto err_exit;

    char *p2 = malloc(...);
    if (p2 == NULL)
        goto err_exit;

    ...

err_exit:
    free(p2);
    free(p1);

    return -1;
}

The problem occurs when the first malloc fails. Because we jump across the initialization of p2, it contains random data and the call to free(p2) can crash.

I would expect/hope that this would be treated the same way as in C++ where the compiler does not allow a goto to jump across an initialization.

My question: is jumping across an initialization allowed by the standard or is this a bug in gcc's implementation of c99?

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2  
Seeing how some programs could know what they are doing by jumping across the initialization, I'm betting on "it is allowed", but it's the evening before a prolonged week-end in my timezone so I'm not looking it up. Great question though. –  Pascal Cuoq May 12 '10 at 18:38
1  
Interesting - as far as I can tell from a moment's glance, the C99 standard is silent about goto's past declaration/initialization except that it says you can't jump into a scope that has a VLA from outside the scope. Then again, I might not be looking in all the right places... –  Michael Burr May 12 '10 at 18:40
    
This is a very good example of why goto is "considered harmful". I'm not totally against it, but it can make things like this easy to do but less obvious. –  nategoose May 12 '10 at 21:00
    
@nategoose: unfortunately, error handling of this kind is one of the areas that goto has a legitimate use (I think, anyway). It's too bad it's still rather error prone for even this use –  Michael Burr May 12 '10 at 21:31
1  
@Michael Burr: I am sorry as well. I did not take your comment to be negative, and did not intend to come across as negative myself. Since many people (theoretically) learn from what is posted here I did not want for someone to get the idea that goto was inherently good or bad, or even the way to do error handling or not to do it. Sometimes it is the best thing to use, sometimes the worst, and sometimes it is the best but used very badly. –  nategoose May 12 '10 at 23:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can ask gcc to warn you when you jump over a variable definition by using -Wjump-misses-init and then you can use -Werror to force the users to deal with it. This warning is included in -Wc++-compat so the gcc developers are aware that the code behaves differently in C versus C++.

You could also change the code slightly:

int func()
{
    char *p1 = malloc(...);
    if (p1 == NULL)
        goto err_exit_1;

    char *p2 = malloc(...);
    if (p2 == NULL)
        goto err_exit_2;

    ...

err_exit_2:
    free(p2);
err_exit_1:
    free(p1);

    return -1;
}

... and just keep pairing labels with initialized variables. You'll have the same problem with calling many other functions with unitialized variables, free just happens to be a more obvious one.

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11  
You can actually do one better - -Werror=jump-misses-init will turn only that warning into an error (this has been available since gcc 4.3, I think). –  Jefromi May 12 '10 at 18:36
3  
Kinda off-topic, but while I'm at it, gcc also understands -Wno-error=..., so that you can turn all warnings to errors then exclude certain ones, if you like. –  Jefromi May 12 '10 at 18:41
1  
This code has an error. If either malloc fails you still try to free(NULL) at least once. –  nategoose May 12 '10 at 22:09
2  
@nategoose - free(NULL) is legal and is defined as a no-op. –  R Samuel Klatchko May 12 '10 at 22:19
3  
@nategoose: On can call it "inefficiency", but it is not an error. free(NULL) is a perfectly legal thing to do. –  AndreyT May 12 '10 at 23:19

A jump like that is indeed allowed by the standard, so this is not a bug in GCC. The standard lists this situation as a suggested warning in Annex I.

The only restriction imposed on jumps in C99 with regard to scope is that it is illegal to jump into scope of a variable of variably modified type, like a VLA

int main() {
  int n = 5;
  goto label; // <- ERROR: illegal jump
  int a[n];
label:;
}

In other words, it is not correct to say that "a jump is just a jump in C". Jumps are somewhat restricted when it comes to entering variable scope, albeit not as strictly as in C++. The situation you describe is not one of the restricted ones.

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This is not a bug in gcc. A jump is just a jump in C. There is no special logic applied. The issue is that you are not initializing your pointers to NULL first. If you were to do that then you free call would be free(NULL) which would not crash. Start the function with char *p1 = NULL, *p2 = NULL; and all will be well.

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It is cleaner to define the variables closer to where they are used. It is also cleaner to centralize the error handling at the end of the function and to just jump to it on error. –  florin May 12 '10 at 18:36
    
I agree in principle and I like your solution but if you can see the whole function on one screen then where you declare the variables becomes moot. If you can't see the whole function on one screen then you have bigger problems. –  charlieb May 12 '10 at 18:45
    
Yes, I agree pointers and all other variable should be initialize to something before you use them. In the example, you are referencing an uninitialized variable. –  Jim Tshr May 12 '10 at 19:14
    
+1; you can mark code sections within your answer with backticks –  Christoph May 12 '10 at 19:27

Hmm, it's not because the new standard allows for variable declarations anywhere that it's always a good idea to use it. In your case I would do like we did it in classic C.

int func()
{
char *p1 = NULL;    /* So we have a definite value */
char *p2 = NULL;

  p1 = malloc(...);
  if(!p1)
    goto err_exit;

  p2 = malloc(...);
  if(!p2)
    goto err_exit;

  ...

  err_exit:
    free(p2);
    free(p1);

  return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I prefer just a single goto label for simple cases such as this which don't require separate labels for 'early errors'. –  James Morris May 13 '10 at 18:18

if i compile this code with -O2 flag

gcc -Wall -std=c99 -O2 jump.c

i've got warning:

jump.c: In function ‘func’:
jump.c:10: warning: ‘p2’ may be used uninitialised in this function

and no warning without optimization

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As AndreyT says, jumping over the initialisation is allowed by C99. You can fix your logic by using seperate labels for the two failures:

int func()
{
    char *p1 = malloc(...);
    if (p1 == NULL)
        goto err_exit_p1;

    char *p2 = malloc(...);
    if (p2 == NULL)
        goto err_exit;

    ...

err_exit:
    free(p2);
err_exit_p1:
    free(p1);

    return -1;
}

This is a standard pattern - "early errors" cause a jump to a later part of the error exit code.

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My real concern is how to identify where code like this may have made it into our code base. –  R Samuel Klatchko May 13 '10 at 0:17
    
@R Samuel Klatchko: If you compile with -Wuninitialized (which required -O1 or higher) then you will get a warning: foo.c:10: warning: ‘p2’ may be used uninitialized in this function –  caf May 13 '10 at 0:37
    
thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately, -Wuninitialized does not catch this for me (we are still using gcc 3.4.5). –  R Samuel Klatchko May 13 '10 at 0:51

Using gotos is not a smart idea, and you've just found one reason why. You should call an error handling function for each individual error.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is not specific to goto. The same problem can be reproduced with other kinds of jumps, like switch/case statement. –  AndreyT May 12 '10 at 19:15
1  
This is just silly. goto has perfectly useful applications, and it's use here can be seen mirrored in almost all major C projects, including the Linux kernel. Using goto for error handling is a well-established "good" use of goto. Stop advancing the ignorant and categorical banning of misunderstood language features! –  Chris Lutz May 12 '10 at 19:16
    
This answer is just plain old wrong. florin's answer is the standard idiom at work here. –  Joshua May 12 '10 at 19:18
    
Guess I'm just out of date. –  Puppy May 12 '10 at 20:57

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