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I am writing a large Markdown document and would like to place a table of contents of sorts at the beginning that will provide links to various locations in the document. How can I do this?

I tried using

[a link](# MyTitle)

where MyTitle is a title within the document and this didn't work.

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Link to stackoverflow.com/questions/12204257/… for R Markdown (Rmd). –  Etienne Low-Décarie Mar 7 at 16:49
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In pandoc, if you use the option --toc in producing html, a table of contents will be produced with links to the sections, and back to the table of contents from the section headings. It is similar with the other formats pandoc writes, like LaTeX, rtf, rst, etc. So with the command

pandoc --toc happiness.txt -o happiness.html

this bit of markdown:

% True Happiness

Introduction
------------

Many have posed the question of true happiness.  In this blog post we propose to
solve it.

First Attempts
--------------

The earliest attempts at attaining true happiness of course aimed at pleasure. 
Soon, though, the downside of pleasure was revealed.

will yield this as the body of the html:

    <h1 class="title">
        True Happiness
    </h1>
    <div id="TOC">
        <ul>
            <li>
                <a href="#introduction">Introduction</a>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="#first-attempts">First Attempts</a>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </div>
    <div id="introduction">
        <h2>
            <a href="#TOC">Introduction</a>
        </h2>
        <p>
            Many have posed the question of true happiness. In this blog post we propose to solve it.
        </p>
    </div>
    <div id="first-attempts">
        <h2>
            <a href="#TOC">First Attempts</a>
        </h2>
        <p>
            The earliest attempts at attaining true happiness of course aimed at pleasure. Soon, though, the downside of pleasure was revealed.
        </p>
    </div>
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Thanks, this was exactly what I needed. I was using Textmate to convert Markdown to HTML, will switch to pandoc. –  recipriversexclusion May 13 '10 at 3:08
    
You might give the demo Pandoc tmbundle up on Github a try (there's also emacs pandoc-mode, etc.) The tmbundle re-uses the MultiMarkdown-specific syntax highlighter, so there are a (very) few oddities. Also, a lot of the associated scripts are highly customized -- e.g. Context, not LaTeX etc. -- but the idea is that the users will alter them as they please, which I found pretty simple. It should probably be git clone -ed into the lowest or outermost tmbundle directory, ~/Library/Application\ Support/TextMate/Bundles to simplify integration. –  applicative May 14 '10 at 13:11
    
I wonder what pandoc does in the case of two headings with the same name? –  Steve Powell Jun 29 '11 at 10:29
1  
It adds -1 to the first repetition of the id, -2 to the second, etc. –  applicative Jun 29 '11 at 21:34
2  
I found that I had to add the --standalone option to the pandoc command to get it to actually output the table of contents itself in the output. Without that switch, it would make the headers into links back to the #toc named anchor, but not actually output the named anchor and list of like itself. –  Duncan Lock May 10 '12 at 18:43
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Experimenting, I found a solution using <div…/> but an obvious solution is to place your own anchor point in the page wherever you like, thus:

<a name="abcde"/>

before the line you want to 'link' to. Don't forget the quotation marks around it. Then a markdown link like:

[link text](#abcde)

anywhere in the document takes you there.

The <div…/> solution inserts a "dummy" division just to add the id property, and this is potentially disruptive to the page structure, but the <a name="abcde"/> solution ought to be quite innocuous.

(PS: It might be OK to put the anchor in the line you wish to link to, as follows:

## <a name="head1"/>Heading One

but this depends on how Markdown treats this. I note, for example, the Stack Overflow answer formatter is happy with this!)

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1  
If you do this you should be aware that the div strips other markdown formatting, such as ## headers. –  2rs2ts Jul 4 '11 at 16:47
    
@user691859 Can you elaborate? Perhaps we can update an answer to make it work better. I saw TextMate suppress highlighting, until I indented the div, but no problem with the processed markdown viewed from a browser. –  Steve Powell Jul 5 '11 at 15:55
    
In WriteMonkey I found that if I precede any text with the <div/> several lines below are affected. Instead I have to wrap the text I am linking in a full div tag clause and I have to RE-SPECIFY the behavior from scratch using real HTML. Boo. –  2rs2ts Jul 6 '11 at 17:28
    
I overlooked the most obvious tag to put in, and this also works for me. Put in a named anchor tag! Update to main answer follows. –  Steve Powell Jul 11 '11 at 9:48
3  
This works well, thanks. For anyone wondering, this also works with GitHub-hosted-and-displayed Markdown files. –  Alex Dean Mar 5 '12 at 15:52
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Github automatically parses anchor tags out of your headers. So you can do the following:

[Foo](#foo)

# Foo

In the above case, the "Foo" header has generated an anchor tag with the name "foo". Note: anchor tag names are lowercase, and delimited by dashes if multi-word.

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There is no such directive in the Markdown spec. Sorry.

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Uh oh! Do you know if MultiMarkdown or Textile support it? I was thinking of migrating to MD for all my documentation but this a deal breaker. Thanks for the help! –  recipriversexclusion May 12 '10 at 22:38
    
RestructuredText supports this docutils.sourceforge.net/rst.html –  Jared Forsyth May 20 '13 at 1:15
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This may be out-of-date thread but to create inner document links in markdown in Github use...
(NOTE: lowercase #title)

    # Contents
     - [Specification](#specification) 
     - [Dependencies Title](#dependencies-title) 

    ## Specification
    Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. 

    ## Dependencies Title
    Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. Example text blah. 
Example text blah. Example text blah. 

A good question was made so I have edited my answer;

An inner link can be made to any title size using - #, ##, ###, #### I created a quick example below... https://github.com/aogilvie/markdownLinkTest

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In your example, the link tags only have one #, but the headers that they are supposed to link to have two ##; shouldn't they be the same? –  Karim Bahgat Feb 24 at 18:55
1  
Good question. The answer is no. the # in (#dependencies-title) tells Github markdown this is an inner link. The text that follows can be any title size. Here is an example test I made...https://github.com/aogilvie/markdownLinkTest –  Ally Feb 27 at 2:06
    
Does that depend on the flavor of markdown? It seems like it works fine in the markdown editor, but when I save to html or pdf the ids dont get added to the appropriate tags. I'd be fine just dumping an anchor in there, but it seems like your method is so much cleaner and faster. –  meteorainer Apr 8 at 20:18
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