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I am helping someone with some software they are selling. I am contributing code for free.

The code that I wrote uses open source licenses and i have included them with the source code.

Which software license can i put my code under? I would like to totally give the software to them for free.

Please ask questions if there are issues O_o.

Update: The library which is included is under Apache License, Version 2.0. Sorry for not including before.

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Do you use any GPL code? –  SLaks May 12 '10 at 23:34
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The more important question is whether or not the other open source licenses are compatible. –  Taylor Leese May 12 '10 at 23:35
    
@Taylor the library is using apache v2 as updated in the question now. Thanks. –  JavaRocky May 12 '10 at 23:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

How about the MIT License?

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

If you're using any other open-source code, make sure that the licenses are compatible.

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In general, if the code you wrote uses license X, you must put your own code under a license that is compatible with that license (for instance, if you use GPL'd code, you must license your own code in a way that is compatible with that... and the person using your code must do so as well).

What licenses are the code you're using under?

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I've always used MIT in this situation.

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What about a creative-commons with attribution only? http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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You'd want to put at least some sort of protection in there. Along the lines of "Do what you want with this code, but don't come crying to me if it causes a nuclear meltdown." –  anthony-arnold May 12 '10 at 23:38
    
That is a warranty/disclaimer I believe, and not a license –  Mitch Dempsey May 12 '10 at 23:39

The license to your own code is not that important ("I hereby release this in the public domain" does the trick).

It's far more important to check what the OS code you used is licensed under! If you have any GPL code, then the "restriction" of being compelled to provide full source code to the application will make it a no-no for your friends.

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