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When defining nested classes, is it possible to access the "outer" class' methods? I know it's possible to access its attributes, but I can't seem to find a way to use its methods.

    addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
        @Override
        public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
            if (e.getClickCount() == 2 && //<-- Here I'd like to
        }                                 // reference a method
    });                                   //from the class where
                                          //addMouseListener() is defined!

Thanks

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2  
It should just work. What compiler error did you got? –  BalusC May 13 '10 at 0:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As your inner class is non-static, all methods of the outer class are automatically visible to the inner class, even private ones.

So, just go ahead and call the method that you want.

For example,

   class MyClass extends JPanel
   {

        void doStuff()
        {
        }

        boolean someLogic()
        {
           return 1>2;
        }

        void setupUI() 
        {
            addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
               @Override
               public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
                 if (e.getClickCount() == 2 && someLogic())
                   doStuff();
               }
            });                                
        }
    }                                       

For more on this, see the Sun Tutorial on Nested Classes.

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Ah, you're right. My mistake was trying to do this. to try to see what methods were available in the IDE. –  devoured elysium May 13 '10 at 0:51
    
1>2? That isn't logical! ;) –  BalusC May 13 '10 at 0:52
1  
it's logical - it just isn't true. ;-) (I guess someone's going to quote me a scene from Star Trek or aomething now...) –  mdma May 13 '10 at 1:00

Failing everything else you could define a self reference attribute :

MyClass current = this;

and use that..

Though I would also like to know the true, clean, answer to your question!

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Ah, that sure is a nice idea! –  devoured elysium May 13 '10 at 0:34
1  
If you mean to put that in the inner class, that's not quite right - the 'this' pointer will point to the inner class. To get the outer class this pointer, you have to qualify it with the outer class name, e.g. OuterClass.this. –  mdma May 13 '10 at 0:43
    
Agreed, I think you may have misunderstood - we're talking about declaring the self reference in the outer class, and using it in the inner class - as mentioned the outer class attributes can be accessed from the inner class. –  filip-fku May 13 '10 at 0:45
2  
If using Outer.this is too cumbersome for you, you might do this, but I would call it outer not current and declare it in the inner class. Personally I hate the implicit access to the outer class (it's way too easy to screw things up with any other than trivial classes), so I usually use a static class with an explicit member variable called outer and pass the outer class instance as a parameter during construction. –  Lawrence Dol May 13 '10 at 2:38
    
@Software Monkey: static outer class with manual inner class reference, +1. Great suggestion! –  Pindatjuh May 13 '10 at 14:12

There is another trick for using outer-class references in inner-classes, which I often use:

class OuterClass extends JFrame {

    private boolean methodName() {
        return true;
    }

    public void doStuff() {
        // uses the local defined method
        addMouseListener(new MouseAdapter() {
           @Override
           public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e) {
               System.out.println(methodName()); // false
               // localclass method
               System.out.println(OuterClass.this.methodName()); // true
               // outerclass method
               OuterClass.super.addMouseListener(this); // don't run this, btw
               // uses the outerclasses super defined method
           }
           private boolean methodName() {
               return false;
           }
        });                                
    }

    @Override
    public void addMouseListener(MouseListener a) {
        a.mouseClicked(null);
    }

 }
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