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How do I add information to an exception message without changing its class in ruby?

The approach I'm currently using is

strings.each_with_index do |string, i|
  begin
    do_risky_operation(string)
  rescue
    raise $!.class, "Problem with string number #{i}: #{$!}"
  end
end

Ideally, I would also like to preserve the backtrace.

Is there a better way?

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3  
+1 for doing risky operations in ruby –  Jim Schubert May 13 '10 at 0:46
5  
+1 for asking a question I can understand which provides answers I have to study :) –  Yar May 13 '10 at 0:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

To reraise the exception and modify the message, while preserving the exception class and its backtrace, simply do:

begin
  1/0
rescue Exception => e
  raise $!, "You fool! Look what you have done! #{$!}", $!.backtrace
end

Which will yield:

# ZeroDivisionError: You fool! Look what you have done! divided by 0
#     from (irb):20:in `/'
#     from (irb):20
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2  
+1 for preserving the backtrace. IMO, this is the right answer because the question asks how to add information to an exception message. The currently accepted answer preserves the class but loses the backtrace, which is often a critical piece of information. –  Sim Aug 31 '13 at 16:03

It's not much better, but you can just reraise the exception with a new message:

raise $!, "Problem with string number #{i}: #{$!}"

You can also get a modified exception object yourself with the exception method:

new_exception = $!.exception "Problem with string number #{i}: #{$!}"
raise new_exception
share|improve this answer
    
The first snippet is what I'm after. Looking at the documentation for Kernel#raise, it says that if you have more than one argument, the first item can be either an Exception class, or an object that returns an exception when .exception is called. I think my brain has just had an exception. –  Andrew Grimm May 13 '10 at 1:00
    
but wouldn't this nix the original message? Wouldn't @Mark Rushakoff's approach be more conservative? –  Yar May 13 '10 at 10:46
1  
@yar: No, this doesn't nix the original message. That's the entire purpose of the #{$!} interpolation. It would nix the original message if you left that out, just like if you left out the call to super in Mark's method. I would frankly say my way is more conservative, since it's just using the language's intended exception re-raising mechanisms, whereas Mark's solution involves creating a whole module and redefining the message method just to get the same effect. –  Chuck May 13 '10 at 17:13
    
Okay, thanks for the explanation, that's actually quite cool. I didn't realize that raise can take more than one param... I should've guessed that re-raising errors was already contemplated in Ruby, as it is a necessary thing. –  Yar May 13 '10 at 17:51

My approach would be to extend the rescued error with an anonymous module that extends the error's message method:

def make_extended_message(msg)
    Module.new do
      @@msg = msg
      def message
        super + @@msg
      end
    end
end

begin
  begin
      raise "this is a test"
  rescue
      raise($!.extend(make_extended_message(" that has been extended")))
  end
rescue
    puts $! # just says "this is a test"
    puts $!.message # says extended message
end

That way, you don't clobber any other information in the exception (i.e. its backtrace).

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For those curious, if an exception occurs in message, you don't get a Stack Overflow, but if you were to do so in Exception#initialize, you do. –  Andrew Grimm May 13 '10 at 3:02
    
And thanks to Ruby being dynamic yet strongly typed, it's easy to get an Exception in the message method. Just try to add a String and number together :) –  Yar May 13 '10 at 10:48
    
@yar: Easily worked around by doing super + String(@@msg) or equivalent. –  Mark Rushakoff May 13 '10 at 10:50
    
To be just a bit polemic, your first instinct was not to do that. And you probably wouldn't think of that in your unit tests either (the holy grail of dynamic langs). So someday it would blow up at runtime, and THEN you'd add that safeguard. –  Yar May 13 '10 at 10:53
    
I'm not JUST complaining about dynamic langs: I'm also thinking about how to defensively program in them. –  Yar May 13 '10 at 11:28

Here's another way:

class Exception
  def with_extra_message extra
    exception "#{message} - #{extra}"
  end
end

begin
  1/0
rescue => e
  raise e.with_extra_message "you fool"
end

# raises an exception "ZeroDivisionError: divided by 0 - you fool" with original backtrace

(revised to use the exception method internally, thanks @Chuck)

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I put my vote that Ryan Heneise's answer should be the accepted one.

This is a common problem in complex applications and preserving the original backtrace is often critical so much so that we have a utility method in our ErrorHandling helper module for this.

One of the problems we discovered was that sometimes trying to generate more meaningful messages when a system is in a messed up state would result in exceptions being generated inside the exception handler itself which led us to harden our utility function as follows:

def raise_with_new_message(*args)
  ex = args.first.kind_of?(Exception) ? args.shift : $!
  msg = begin
    sprintf args.shift, *args
  rescue Exception => e
    "internal error modifying exception message for #{ex}: #{e}"
  end
  raise ex, msg, ex.backtrace
end

When things go well

begin
  1/0
rescue => e
  raise_with_new_message "error dividing %d by %d: %s", 1, 0, e
end

you get a nicely modified message

ZeroDivisionError: error dividing 1 by 0: divided by 0
    from (irb):19:in `/'
    from (irb):19
    from /Users/sim/.rvm/rubies/ruby-2.0.0-p247/bin/irb:16:in `<main>'

When things go badly

begin
  1/0
rescue => e
  # Oops, not passing enough arguments here...
  raise_with_new_message "error dividing %d by %d: %s", e
end

you still don't lose track of the big picture

ZeroDivisionError: internal error modifying exception message for divided by 0: can't convert ZeroDivisionError into Integer
    from (irb):25:in `/'
    from (irb):25
    from /Users/sim/.rvm/rubies/ruby-2.0.0-p247/bin/irb:16:in `<main>'
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you rescuing from the Exception class, rather than StandardError? –  Andrew Grimm Sep 1 '13 at 1:46
    
@AndrewGrimm rescuing StandardError does not cover the kinds of edge cases that tend to occur with greater frequency when the proverbial hits the fan. Good examples are LoadError and NotImplementedError. We've also had cases of #to_s causing stack overflows as they smartly try to produce meaningful messages in complex data structures. You just don't know what will happen. –  Sim Sep 1 '13 at 2:33

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