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The question is a little complex. The problem here is to get rid of duplicates and save the unique elements of array into another array with their original sequence.

For example :

If the input is entered b a c a d t

The result should be : b a c d t in the exact state that the input entered.

So, for sorting the array then checking couldn't work since I lost the original sequence. I was advised to use array of indices but I don't know how to do. So what is your advise to do that?


For those who are willing to answer the question I wanted to add some specific information.

char** finduni(char *words[100],int limit)
{
//
//Methods here
//
}

is the my function. The array whose duplicates should be removed and stored in a different array is words[100]. So, the process will be done on this. I firstly thought about getting all the elements of words into another array and sort that array but that doesn't work after some tests. Just a reminder for solvers :).

share|improve this question
    
Is this an array of chars like your example suggests? In that case, simply keep an array of 256 boolean values that indicate which characters you've seen before. –  Thomas May 13 '10 at 11:06
    
It has to be in order though... –  Phil May 13 '10 at 11:10
    
I have some questions - Is the input entered 1 at a time, or all at once? Is this an array of char, or some other type with a higher bound? –  Phil May 13 '10 at 11:14
    
@thomas it is an array of strings. I just kept the example short. char *words[100] -> this kind of array. @phil input entered all at once. –  LuckySlevin May 13 '10 at 11:19
    
Is this homework? –  Trevor Tippins May 13 '10 at 13:14

5 Answers 5

Well, here is a version for char types. Note it doesn't scale.

#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"

void removeDuplicates(unsigned char *string)
{
   unsigned char allCharacters [256] = { 0 };
   int lookAt;
   int writeTo = 0;
   for(lookAt = 0; lookAt < strlen(string); lookAt++)
   {
      if(allCharacters[ string[lookAt] ] == 0)
      {
         allCharacters[ string[lookAt] ] = 1;  // mark it seen
         string[writeTo++] = string[lookAt];     // copy it
      }
   }
   string[writeTo] = '\0';
}

int main()
{
   char word[] = "abbbcdefbbbghasdddaiouasdf";
   removeDuplicates(word);
   printf("Word is now [%s]\n", word);
   return 0;
}

The following is the output:

Word is now [abcdefghsiou]

Is that something like what you want? You can modify the method if there are spaces between the letters, but if you use int, float, double or char * as the types, this method won't scale at all.

EDIT

I posted and then saw your clarification, where it's an array of char *. I'll update the method.


I hope this isn't too much code. I adapted this QuickSort algorithm and basically added index memory to it. The algorithm is O(n log n), as the 3 steps below are additive and that is the worst case complexity of 2 of them.

  1. Sort the array of strings, but every swap should be reflected in the index array as well. After this stage, the i'th element of originalIndices holds the original index of the i'th element of the sorted array.
  2. Remove duplicate elements in the sorted array by setting them to NULL, and setting the index value to elements, which is the highest any can be.
  3. Sort the array of original indices, and make sure every swap is reflected in the array of strings. This gives us back the original array of strings, except the duplicates are at the end and they are all NULL.
  4. For good measure, I return the new count of elements.

Code:

#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

void sortArrayAndSetCriteria(char **arr, int elements, int *originalIndices)
{
   #define  MAX_LEVELS  1000
   char *piv;
   int  beg[MAX_LEVELS], end[MAX_LEVELS], i=0, L, R;
   int idx, cidx;
   for(idx = 0; idx < elements; idx++)
      originalIndices[idx] = idx;
   beg[0] = 0;
   end[0] = elements;
   while (i>=0)
   {
      L = beg[i];
      R = end[i] - 1;
      if (L<R)
      {
         piv = arr[L];
         cidx = originalIndices[L];
         if (i==MAX_LEVELS-1)
            return;
         while (L < R)
         {
            while (strcmp(arr[R], piv) >= 0 && L < R) R--;
            if (L < R)
            {
               arr[L] = arr[R];
               originalIndices[L++] = originalIndices[R];
            }
            while (strcmp(arr[L], piv) <= 0 && L < R) L++;
            if (L < R)
            {
               arr[R] = arr[L];
               originalIndices[R--] = originalIndices[L];
            }
         }
         arr[L] = piv;
         originalIndices[L] = cidx;
         beg[i + 1] = L + 1;
         end[i + 1] = end[i];
         end[i++] = L;
      }
      else
      {
         i--;
      }
   }
}

int removeDuplicatesFromBoth(char **arr, int elements, int *originalIndices)
{
   // now remove duplicates
   int i = 1, newLimit = 1;
   char *curr = arr[0];
   while (i < elements)
   {
      if(strcmp(curr, arr[i]) == 0)
      {
         arr[i] = NULL;   // free this if it was malloc'd
         originalIndices[i] = elements;  // place it at the end
      }
      else
      {
         curr = arr[i];
         newLimit++;
      }
      i++;
   }
   return newLimit;
}

void sortArrayBasedOnCriteria(char **arr, int elements, int *originalIndices)
{
   #define  MAX_LEVELS  1000
   int piv;
   int beg[MAX_LEVELS], end[MAX_LEVELS], i=0, L, R;
   int idx;
   char *cidx;
   beg[0] = 0;
   end[0] = elements;
   while (i>=0)
   {
      L = beg[i];
      R = end[i] - 1;
      if (L<R)
      {
         piv = originalIndices[L];
         cidx = arr[L];
         if (i==MAX_LEVELS-1)
            return;
         while (L < R)
         {
            while (originalIndices[R] >= piv && L < R) R--;
            if (L < R)
            {
               arr[L] = arr[R];
               originalIndices[L++] = originalIndices[R];
            }
            while (originalIndices[L] <= piv && L < R) L++;
            if (L < R)
            {
               arr[R] = arr[L];
               originalIndices[R--] = originalIndices[L];
            }
         }
         arr[L] = cidx;
         originalIndices[L] = piv;
         beg[i + 1] = L + 1;
         end[i + 1] = end[i];
         end[i++] = L;
      }
      else
      {
         i--;
      }
   }
}

int removeDuplicateStrings(char *words[], int limit)
{
   int *indices = (int *)malloc(limit * sizeof(int));
   int newLimit;
   sortArrayAndSetCriteria(words, limit, indices);
   newLimit = removeDuplicatesFromBoth(words, limit, indices);
   sortArrayBasedOnCriteria(words, limit, indices);
   free(indices);
   return newLimit;
}

int main()
{
   char *words[] = { "abc", "def", "bad", "hello", "captain", "def", "abc", "goodbye" };
   int newLimit = removeDuplicateStrings(words, 8);
   int i = 0;
   for(i = 0; i < newLimit; i++) printf(" Word @ %d = %s\n", i, words[i]);
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
read the first post dude. –  LuckySlevin May 13 '10 at 11:25
    
Thanks so much. Actually it would be enough too that you gave me the idea and i could code the idea. Thanks for your efforts. I will try this in no time. –  LuckySlevin May 13 '10 at 13:05
    
No problem. It's been a while since I used C so there may be corner cases in there, and it's not the most DRY code out there. Hope it helps! –  Phil May 13 '10 at 13:32
  1. Traverse through the items in the array - O(n) operation
  2. For each item, add it to another sorted-array
  3. Before adding it to the sorted array, check if the entry already exists - O(log n) operation

Finally, O(n log n) operation

share|improve this answer
    
According to the OP, the new array needs to maintain the original sorting, though. –  Nick Meyer May 13 '10 at 11:13
    
You can replace the sorted array of steps 2. and 3. by a hashset, and you get amortized O(n) for the whole operation. This assumes that you have a hash function over the elements to de-dupe, but we were already assuming that we had a total order, so... –  Pascal Cuoq May 13 '10 at 11:15
    
@Nick perhaps MasterGaurav didn't explain it well enough, but ey is clearly thinking of an algorithm that preserves the order from the original array (duplicated elements are represented in the result array in the position of their first occurrence in the original array) –  Pascal Cuoq May 13 '10 at 11:17
    
@Pascal Doesn't seem clear from the current wording. I'm a little fuzzy on how you can check for an existing element in O(log n) time without having the array sorted. Unless we're talking about a third, temporary array? –  Nick Meyer May 13 '10 at 11:20
    
@Nick I'm pretty sure it's a third structure (perhaps not an array at all). Think of it as a hashset, then it won't be confused with either the source or the result array :) –  Pascal Cuoq May 13 '10 at 11:23

i think that in C you can create a second array. then you copy the element from the original array only if this element is not already in the send array. this also preserve the order of the element.

if you read the element one by one you can discard the element before insert in the original array, this could speedup the process.

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Can you explain how do you speed up here? Search costs remain the name.. best O(log n) for sorted –  MasterGaurav May 13 '10 at 11:20
    
guys guys :). The problem here is getting the job done actually not the complexity. So try to focus on that pls. –  LuckySlevin May 13 '10 at 11:21

As Thomas suggested in a comment, if each element of the array is guaranteed to be from a limited set of values (such as a char) you can achieve this in O(n) time.

  1. Keep an array of 256 bool (or int if your compiler doesn't support bool) or however many different discrete values could possibly be in the array. Initialize all the values to false.
  2. Scan the input array one-by-one.
  3. For each element, if the corresponding value in the bool array is false, add it to the output array and set the bool array value to true. Otherwise, do nothing.
share|improve this answer
    
the problem is array isn't a char array it is a string array. –  LuckySlevin May 13 '10 at 11:20
    
Yep, I see you've added that now. –  Nick Meyer May 13 '10 at 11:22

You know how to do it for char type, right? You can do same thing with strings, but instead of using array of bools (which is technically an implementation of "set" object), you'll have to simulate the "set"(or array of bools) with a linear array of strings you already encountered. I.e. you have an array of strings you already saw, for each new string you check if it is in array of "seen" strings, if it is, then you ignore it (not unique), if it is not in array, you add it to both array of seen strings and output. If you have a small number of different strings (below 1000), you could ignore performance optimizations, and simply compare each new string with everything you already saw before.

With large number of strings (few thousands), however, you'll need to optimize things a bit:

1) Every time you add a new string to an array of strings you already saw, sort the array with insertion sort algorithm. Don't use quickSort, because insertion sort tends to be faster when data is almost sorted.

2) When checking if string is in array, use binary search.

If number of different strings is reasonable (i.e. you don't have billions of unique strings), this approach should be fast enough.

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