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Something that confuses me, but has never caused any problems... the recommended way to dispatch an event is as follows:

public event EventHandler SomeEvent;
...
{
    ....
    if(SomeEvent!=null)SomeEvent();
}

In a multi-threaded environment, how does this code guarantee that another thread will not alter the invocation list of SomeEvent between the check for null and the invocation of the event?

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4 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

As you point out, where multiple threads can access SomeEvent simultaneously, one thread could check whether SomeEvent is null and determine that it isn't. Just after doing so, another thread could remove the last registered delegate from SomeEvent. When the first thread attempts to raise SomeEvent, an exception will be thrown. A reasonable way to avoid this scenario is:

void SomeEventInvoke(object sender, EventArgs args) 
{
    EventHandler ev = SomeEvent;
    if (ev != null) ev(sender, args);
}

This works because whenever a delegate is added to or removed from an event using the default implementations of the add and remove accessors, the Delegate.Combine and Delegate.Remove static methods are used. Each of these methods returns a new instance of a delegate, rather than modifying the one passed to it.

In addition, assignment of an object reference in .NET is atomic, and the default implementations of the add and remove event accessors are synchronised. So the code above succeeds by first copying the multicast delegate from the event to a temporary variable. Any changes to SomeEvent after this point will not affect the copy you've made and stored. Thus you can now safely test whether any delegates were registered and subsequently invoke them.

Note that this solution solves one race problem, namely that of an event handler being null when it's invoked. It doesn't handle the problem where an event handler is defunct when it's invoked, or an event handler subscribes after the copy is taken.

For example, if an event handler depends on state that's destroyed as soon as the handler is un-subscribed, then this solution might invoke code that cannot run properly. See Eric Lippert's excellent blog entry for more details. Also, see this StackOverflow question and answers.

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I have a problem with the statement "In addition, assignments of object references in .NET are thread-safe". You surely meant atomic? As far as I know, if thread A sets a reference on variable V, nothing guarantees that thread B will set the updated reference in variable V, unless V is volatile or lock statements are used while reading and writing V. –  Christophe Keller Apr 6 '11 at 13:26
    
That also means that your example is broken. If thread A added event handlers to SomeEvent, and then thread B invokes SomeEvent, it may very well be the case that thread B sees SomeEvent as null, unless SomeEvent was declared as volatile –  Christophe Keller Apr 6 '11 at 13:31
    
@Christophe, by "thread-safe", I mean that assignment of an object reference in one thread will never be interrupted or seen as inconsistent by another thread. As mentioned in my update, that's definitely not the same thing as saying that thread A and thread B will always have the same view of the event. All this example does is prevent one specific race condition, not every race condition. –  RoadWarrior Apr 8 '11 at 23:04
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The simplest way remove this null check is to assign the eventhandler to an anonymous delegate. The penalty incurred in very little and relieves you of all the null checks, race conditions etc.

public event EventHandler SomeEvent = delegate {};

Related question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/170907/is-there-a-downside-to-adding-an-anonymous-empty-delegate-on-event-declaration

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Why is this not marked as the "official" answer? This is the only good answer. –  yfeldblum Nov 12 '08 at 6:03
2  
I don't agree. That method seems like a hack and does not make firing events "safe" or reliable, it only solves the null checking issue. Please see my explanation in the related thread. –  Scott P Nov 12 '08 at 6:22
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The recommended way is a little different and uses a temporary as follows:

EventHandler tmpEvent = SomeEvent;
if (tmpEvent != null)
{
    tmpEvent();
}
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so does that clone the invocation list then? –  spender Nov 12 '08 at 0:55
    
yes -- I'll edit with an example. –  denis phillips Nov 12 '08 at 1:06
    
Alternatively you could call GetInvocationList into a temporary and execute each in order. –  denis phillips Nov 12 '08 at 1:12
    
dp, you don't need to do this. See my answer for why. –  RoadWarrior Nov 12 '08 at 1:38
    
RW: agreed. I was trying to point out that essentially this does the same thing. Good answer. +1 –  denis phillips Nov 12 '08 at 18:47
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Safer approach:


public class Test
{
    private EventHandler myEvent;
    private object eventLock = new object();

    private void OnMyEvent()
    {
        EventHandler handler;

        lock(this.eventLock)
        {
            handler = this.myEvent;
        }
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public event MyEvent
    {
        add
        {
            lock(this.eventLock)
            {
                this.myEvent += value;
            }
        }
        remove
        {
            lock(this.eventLock)
            {
                this.myEvent -= value;
            }
        }

    }
}

-bill

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1  
This is the correct approach as given by Jon Skeet in yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/events.html –  Christophe Keller Apr 6 '11 at 14:03
1  
You have synchronized the assignment of handler with a lock, but won't checking for null after leaving the synchronized block still allow for the same issues? –  user12345613 Sep 8 '11 at 17:15
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