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I was just looking at this post which describes how to wrap entire words in vim. The accepted solution was this:

:set formatoptions=l
:set lbr

Which takes this text (tabs are shown as \t):

 *Inside of window                        *Outside of window
|---------------------------------------|    
|\t\tthis is a like of text that will wr|ap here                            
|\t\tcan you see the wrap               |
|                                       |
|---------------------------------------|

This accomplishes a behavior like this (tabs are shown as \t):

 *Inside of window                        *Outside of window
|---------------------------------------|    
|\t\tthis is a like of text that will   |
|wrap here                              |
|\t\tcan you see the wrap               |
|                                       |
|---------------------------------------|

I would however like to redefine this function. I would like the wrapped line to have the same number of tabs in front of it that the line above has plus one. Ie:

 *Inside of window                        *Outside of window
|---------------------------------------|    
|\t\tthis is a like of text that will   |
|\t\t\twrap here                        |
|\t\tcan you see the wrap               |
|                                       |
|---------------------------------------|

Any ideas?

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20  
+1 for the effort taken to make the question as clear as possible. –  Jeffrey Jose May 13 '10 at 16:47
    
Do you want the text to soft-wrap at the edge of the window, or hard-wrap when the line reaches a certain length? I think you want hard-wrapping (where a newline is inserted into your text after the word "will"), but it's difficult to tell from your examples. –  Bill Odom May 13 '10 at 23:31
    
@Bill, I am mostly interested in softwrapping but a hardwrapping solution would also be acceptable. –  sixtyfootersdude May 14 '10 at 10:03
1  
The functionality you want isn't currently built in to Vim. There's a patch that comes close, however: groups.google.com/group/vim_dev/web/vim-patches (it's #15, "Correctly indent wrapped lines"). –  Bill Odom May 14 '10 at 19:52
    
Related: VimCasts had a nice episode on using external unix utilities to handle this problem: vimcasts.org/e/18 –  Damien Wilson May 15 '10 at 7:59

3 Answers 3

The breakindent patch has what you're looking for. I successfully applied it using instructions found in this thread:

patch vim on mac (with HomeBrew)?

Specifically, echristopherson's Homebrew formula.

I know this thread is old but it's popular on google and I came across it multiple times when trying to find a solution.

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+1 - That is awesome. Thanks for the answer. I am not going to mark this as the accepted answer because I am on a windows machine and patching doesn't seems extremely straightforward. I am going to leave this question open util either the patch is moved into vim or turned into a vim plugin. –  sixtyfootersdude Apr 8 at 23:57
    
Looks like the patch has been pulled into vim. See - retracile.net/blog/2014/07/18/18.00 Update your answer and I will mark it as accepted. (Please mention me in a comment, so I get a notification) –  sixtyfootersdude Aug 5 at 13:39

The best you're going to get is the showbreak option which will put a fixed string in front of each wrapped line (I use set showbreak=...).

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Can you set showbreak to be a function? –  Alexander Bird Sep 13 '11 at 2:01
    
@AlexanderBird According to :help 'showbreak', no, you can’t – showbreak is only a string. –  Rory O'Kane Aug 5 '13 at 21:24

I agree with the answer that says 'showbreak' is the best option. Showbreak does not typically allow you to put nonprinting characters (e.g., spaces or tabs) into the showbreak string, so as typically used it will just give you an indicator along left margin, i.e., no real indent. This isn't great, since main goal of OP, I think, is to give wrapped lines an indent keep them from cluttering left margin area and looking like lines of their own.

So one way to add an (ugly) indent using showbreak is to just use a lot of characters, .e.g, ":set showbreak=>--------------->". This results in something that looks like this:

 *Inside of window                        *Outside of window
|---------------------------------------|    
|\t\tthis is a like of text that will   |
|>--------------->wrap here             |
|\t\tcan you see the wrap               |
|                                       |
|---------------------------------------|

A better alternative might be to make use of nonbreaking space characters (assuming your instance of Vim is unicode enabled), each of which can be entered into the showbreak string using the key sequence of ctrl-v,160. That way you can enter a showbreak string that is blank at the left side and appear to be a true indent. E.g., ":set showbreak=. . . . . . . . . . >>" where each '.' in the command is actually a nonbreaking space character entered by pressing ctrl-V,160. That way you end up with a wrap that is nicely indented, like this:

 *Inside of window                        *Outside of window
|---------------------------------------|    
|\t\tthis is a like of text that will   |
|            >>wrap here                |
|\t\tcan you see the wrap               |
|                                       |
|---------------------------------------|

You still don't have any ability to vary the level of indent according to indent of previous line, but at least you get clean indent of wrapped lines without lots of visual clutter along left margin of window. There could still be confusion if indent of a wrapped line is less than that of the beginning of an actual line, but this could perhaps be avoided by making the showbreak "indent" quite large (i.e., greater than any indent commonly found in your code) but still small enough that it provides enough space for legible wrapping of the text. For many uses I think a showbreak indent of 40 or 50 spaces would do this pretty well.

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7  
You can put spaces in showbreak by escaping them: :set showbreak=\ \ \ \ . Still doesn't work for tabs, however. –  Bill Odom May 14 '10 at 19:45

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