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In light of this question I thought it'd be really neat to have a similar question about C#/.Net.

So, what is the most awkward or misleading method name of the .Net and/or C# API?

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Oct 4 '11 at 23:20

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What's the C# API? I didn't know that it had one. –  John Saunders May 13 '10 at 18:11
1  
@John, well I mean the things like protected internal and such things specific to C# –  Earlz May 13 '10 at 18:27
3  
To whoever voted to close, this is completely valid. Several of these are really good and not well known. –  Joe May 13 '10 at 18:28
2  
@Earlz: I don't know any definition of the term "API" that includes language syntax like "protected internal" in the term "API". –  John Saunders May 13 '10 at 19:30
5  
Geez, somebody's a stickler over here... –  Dan Tao May 14 '10 at 14:20

21 Answers 21

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Just saw this nugget

Not every Freezable object can be frozen. To avoid throwing an InvalidOperationException, check the value of the Freezable object's CanFreeze property to determine whether it can be frozen before attempting to freeze it.

from MSDN

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3  
Why would you.. That's like saying "Not every object that implements IDisposable can be disposed. Check CanDispose property first". That is completely moronic. –  Earlz May 13 '10 at 21:17
5  
Seems reasonable to me. Whether an object is freezable or not may be something that needs to be determined at runtime. –  Brian May 14 '10 at 13:06
7  
@Brian: It seems reasonable, but the point of implementing an IFreezable interface is so that, you know, you can actually freeze the object. You're thinking of an IMaybeFreezable, or something like that. –  RCIX May 16 '10 at 23:30
    
I've encountered plenty of interfaces in the framework which had similar methods for various reasons. In this case, I could easily imagine an object which can be in a mutable state and thus cannot be frozen, particularly in the case that the object has asynchronous functions. –  Brian May 17 '10 at 6:17
3  
Yeesh, they couldn't at least add a TryFreeze method? –  MusiGenesis Jul 7 '11 at 1:38

System.DateTime.Add(*)

I think all the DateTime methods starting with Add are misleading, considering DateTime is an immutable struct and cannot be changed (these methods return values reflecting the addition).

So:

DateTime.Add
DateTime.AddTicks
DateTime.AddMilliseconds

etc.

I would've gone with:

DateTime.Plus
DateTime.PlusTicks
DateTime.PlusMilliseconds

etc.

Arguably the same is true of certain string methods, such as string.Replace; but I don't really know what else you would call that.


Some have raised the objection that since the behavior of the addition operator (+) for numerical values is intuitive (and does not modify the value of the instance), the DateTime.Add(*) methods are no less intuitive. Here's my response to that.

Let's phrase this objection as:

You don't expect that i + 5 modifies i, so why would you think d.Add(t) is any different?

Now let's repeat this exact same question, but with English words in place of code:

You don't expect that i plus 5 modifies i, so why would you think d add t is any different?

See what I'm saying?


Wow, if you want to see one of the longest comment threads ever on an SO question (that I've seen, anyway), just get a load of the comments to this answer. Apparently the notion that the word Add suggests mutability is far more subjective than I thought.

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7  
The operator Addition on integers doesn't change the immutable object when adding another integer I guess you dont Think that's Strange so what is in your oppinion the difference? –  Rune FS May 13 '10 at 17:49
10  
@Rune FS: The difference is that programmers are used to working with operators, and in fact DateTime does accept the + operator in conjunction with TimeSpan values, which is intuitive. But this operator is pronounced "plus", not "add". What if the Int32 struct had an Add method? What would you expect to happen from calling i.Add(5)? That's significantly less intuitive. Furthermore, there is precedent for methods with names starting in Add to mutate mutable objects; e.g. ICollection<T>.Add. –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 17:56
3  
@Aaronaught: Consider the question I posed to Rune FS: if there were an Int32.ChangeTo method, would you not consider this a poorly named method, simply because any smart person would know that ChangeTo couldn't possibly change the underlying Int32... even though, to a lot of developers, that's what the name of the method would imply? –  Dan Tao May 14 '10 at 15:00
3  
@Aaronaught: You keep saying over and over that values are immutable. But we're talking about variables. That DateTime is an immutable struct does not mean that when I type DateTime d = Date.Now;, suddenly d is The Moment of 6:46 PM EST on Friday May 14 2010 for all eternity. For that to be the case, d would have to be declared const -- as a constant, not a variable. The former, which is a value, cannot be changed. Nobody's arguing against that. But d is just a variable, that stores a value. It can be changed -- to a different value -- by assignment. (Cont.) –  Dan Tao May 14 '10 at 22:51
5  
Aaronaught, calm the f*** down bro –  Pierreten Jun 21 '10 at 23:53

One answer: IList<T>.IsReadOnly vs IList.IsReadOnly. The meaning is not clear at all, and it turns out these two properties have different meanings. :)

The blog post I created is summarized here:

There are two types of updates:

  1. An update that changes the value of an element already in the collection, and does not change the number of elements in the collection. e.g., the index setter.
  2. An update that changes the number of values in the collection, but does not change any of the values of the elements in the collection. e.g., Add(), Clear(), etc.

For IList

The value of IsReadOnly is false if either type of update is allowed. It is only set to true if both types of updates are not allowed.

but for IList<T>

[IsReadOnly] should be true if either type of update is not allowed. It is only set to false if both types of updates are allowed.

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That's bizarre! –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 17:41
9  
What are the two meanings? Educate us, please. –  Rubys May 13 '10 at 18:36
    
    
Yeah I've run into this one before, and it's a real PITA. –  Greg Beech May 14 '10 at 8:43

It's not a method, but protected internal has claimed many victims.

Many people (cough cough) initially expect it to mean that only derived types in the current assembly can access the member, but it actually permits derived types in any assembly and any type in the current assembly to access the member.

Eric Lippert explains why this is eminently reasonable in his blog post here (thank you Brian for the link!). It's just a shame it's ambiguous.

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That's annoying. Any others that use "OR"? –  Nelson Rothermel May 13 '10 at 17:50
    
Indeed it has. They should've just made it protected or internal. –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 17:50
    
Awkward and misleading, probably. But it makes sense. And I think protected or internal is much worse syntax. Eric Lippert's explanation: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2010/03/25/… . –  Brian May 13 '10 at 17:55
    
@Brian, many thanks for the link, which I'd completely forgotten about - I'm going to edit it into my answer so casual observers don't think the C# team made an arbitrary call there. –  Jeff Sternal May 13 '10 at 17:59
2  
It depends on the context. There's the MSDN way: "member can be accessed by any code in the same assembly, or by any derived class in another assembly." Okay, that's true, but now read that sentence with "AND"; it makes more sense and is still completely accurate! But if you think about it in the other context: "only code which is in the same assembly AND descends from this class can access this member", then "AND" is wrong - and the people who're confused are probably thinking about it in that context. Ironically, MSDN uses the right context but the wrong word. MSDN should say "AND". –  Igby Largeman May 13 '10 at 19:10

Here's a classic: Path.GetInvalidPathChars, which "is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid"

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2  
True. But thinking about it, it's probably unavoidable. A) it may vary per filesystem so you'd have to also tell it where you want to save and b) it's mostly use as a first check on user input so checking those unprintable makes little sense. –  Isak Savo May 13 '10 at 18:03
3  
True. But why have a useless method, then? I'd much prefer having a method that did get the invalid path characters for a given filesystem. –  Stephen Cleary May 18 '10 at 23:09

System.Linq.Enumerable.Reverse

The Reverse extension method is strangely named, in my opinion. Why? Because List<T>.Reverse already exists, and it reverses the ordering of the list itself. The Reverse extension method, on the other hand, just enumerates over any IEnumerable<T> backwards.

I would've called it Backwards, maybe (or even Reversed, with a "d"). That wouldn't have implied performing any alteration on the list. Plus that way if I wanted to enumerate over a List<T> backwards I could call:

myList.Backwards()

instead of:

((IEnumerable<T>)myList).Reverse()

or:

myList.AsEnumerable().Reverse()
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5  
But... that's the whole point of LINQ. Functional programming, which entails no side-effects whenever possible. –  Rubys May 13 '10 at 18:39
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@Rubys: Yeah, I know; it's just strange when there's already a method with that exact same name in existence, and it does something totally different. Notice they called the method that enumerates over a collection in a sorted order OrderBy as opposed to Sort. (Wouldn't that have been confusing?) –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 18:55
1  
The method to reverse a list (that behaves in the same way) is called reverse in haskell too, and lisp. Don't blame microsoft ! –  Ed Woodcock May 14 '10 at 14:16
    
Nice find Mr. WoodCock –  Pierreten Jun 21 '10 at 23:50

My vote goes to the ICloneable interface and its Clone method.

The term is so vague and ambiguous that important people at Microsoft actually tell you not to implement it or use it in public APIs.

Not only does it tell you nothing about what a "clone" is (is it a memberwise clone? Deep copy? How deep? What if it has external references? What if it references a singleton?) but it's entirely possible for this method to return a different type from the original, since the return type is just System.Object.

It's a thoroughly pointless interface that provides no discoverability whatsoever, and yet it's there, ever present, leading another programmer astray every week. Look at the ICloneable questions and see for yourself. Endless confusion.

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Also, why would you ever declare a variable of type IClonable? –  usr Apr 22 '12 at 13:48

System.Enum.ToString

This might seem like a weird answer, but the first time I learned that ToString on an enum actually returns that enum's name, I was pretty shocked.

To me, this was as surprising as if the following code:

const int SomeSpecialConstant = 1318942;

Console.WriteLine(SomeSpecialConstant.ToString());

Had produced this output:

SomeSpecialConstant

!

In the end, Enum.ToString is extremely convenient, but I still find myself scratching my head about it from time to time.

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2  
Um... No it doesn't. Perhaps you intended to define it as an enum, which would then make sense considering the rest of the post? –  Rubys May 13 '10 at 18:41
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@Rubys: I'm saying, when I first found out about Enum.ToString, I found it as surprising as if the code I posted produced that output. I know it doesn't -- which is what I would expect! Know what I'm saying? –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 18:53
    
I actually did not know this. But this is extremely useful! –  Earlz May 13 '10 at 18:58
    
@Earlz: I won't lie; it makes me uneasy! –  Dan Tao May 13 '10 at 19:10
    
@Dan Tao : I see. Might be a good idea to rephrase that a bit, to avoid misinterpretation by people like me ^^ –  Rubys May 13 '10 at 21:56

Another one that has tripped up many innocent coders: Socket.Connected, which is next to useless. It "reflects the state of the connection as of the most recent operation. If you need to determine the current state of the connection [complex code horror removed]".

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I'd actually like to see said removed code horror. =P –  Erik Forbes May 13 '10 at 17:46
3  
The quote is from the MSDN documentation; follow the link to see it, if you must. I really do not agree with their recommendation. A socket cannot really know if it's connected - the best design is to assume it's connected until a write fails. –  Stephen Cleary May 13 '10 at 17:50
2  
@Stephen: Considering that the, "check if a socket is connected" technique Microsoft advocates there is, "try to write to it, see if it fails," I have to agree with your design advice, since it is morally equivalent but less stupid. Also, the connection might die in between checking the connectivity and trying to write. –  Brian May 13 '10 at 17:57
1  
This isn't an API issue - it's just how TCP/IP works. –  John Saunders May 13 '10 at 18:13
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@John - the API issue is that the Connected property exists at all. –  Joel Mueller May 13 '10 at 18:39

Select()

When MS created LINQ, they used the nomenclature of SQL. So Select, Where, OrderBy, etc. The problem is that these functions already exist in other languages, but with different names:

  1. LINQ uses Select where everyone else uses Map
  2. LINQ uses Where where everyone else uses Select

This is really confusing.

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I find it odd that a generic List has the ForEach extension method and generic IEnumerable does not. Especially since IEnumerable exists to support the foreach() statement.

  var myList = new List<SomeClass>();
  myList.ForEach(x => Console.Write(x.SomeProp)); // works

  IEnumerable<SomeClass> myEnumerable = myList;
  myEnumerable.ForEach(); <--- What? Where is it? Invalid
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8  
Eric Lippert wrote about this: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/… –  Sarah Vessels May 13 '10 at 20:39
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Eric explains why it wasn't supported, but then the Rx team decided to support it, calling it Do and Run instead of ForEach. While I agree with Eric that it's not purely "functional," I also agree with the Rx team that it's very useful (and find it ironic that the functional guys are the ones who added it :). –  Stephen Cleary May 14 '10 at 10:50
1  
It's pretty easy to add as an extension method though, if you really want it –  Ed Woodcock May 14 '10 at 14:19
    
The F# guys added it too, calling it Seq.iter - and they're more functional than just about anyone at Redmond. –  Joel Mueller May 14 '10 at 18:10
    
...and the PFX guys named it ParallelEnumerable.ForAll. Argh! –  Kha May 16 '10 at 16:08

ASP.NET developers should recognize this one:

HttpResponse.IsClientConnected

This method only works when running the web app in IIS, not in the development web server.

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3  
+1 good tip, might come in handy one day –  Neil N May 13 '10 at 20:37

I find the 'TryParse' methods to be awkward, and somewhat misleading.

int i = 15;
var b = int.TryParse("what", out i);
// now i is 0 and b is false

Maybe this is just a minor complaint, and I understand the decisions that went into that API, but it's not entirely clear that i becomes 0, and having to use an 'out' parameter can be a real pain, especially if you don't care what the resultant value is (only that it is valid).

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1  
When you pass something as an out parameter, initializing it is futile. Also, a method that receives an out parameter must give it a value, and since int can't be null, 0 is the obvious choice. It sounds like you want a version where i is a ref parameter instead. Then TryParse() could simply leave it alone when the result is false. –  Igby Largeman May 14 '10 at 20:16
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A method that takes an out parameter has to initialize it. It can't assume the parameter is initialized, so it can't use its value. But I agree that a ref parameter would be better here, since it allows you to specify a "default value" –  Thomas Levesque May 16 '10 at 15:10

Not quite a method name, but I think the behavior of the ValidationExpression property in a RegularExpressionValidator is misleading. A regular expression normally does a partial match unless you explicitly use the start/end anchors (^ and $). The validator always does a full match, with or without the anchors. If you want a "partial" match, you actually have to explicitly match any characters. So you have the following "conversion":

  1. matchthis -> [.]*matchthis[.]*
  2. ^matchthis -> matchthis[.]*
  3. matchthis$ -> [.]*matchthis
  4. ^matchthis$ -> matchthis
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Unfortunately just one more case where regular expressions aren't very regular. Seriously if anyone can find two completely different products with exactly the same regex system I would be shocked. –  Jeff Mc May 13 '10 at 21:36
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Even Visual Studio uses a different regex system than the languages you write using Visual Studio. –  Joel Mueller May 13 '10 at 22:09

I found people coming from C++ backgrounds have really tough time visualising that structs instances created using new dont go on the heap!!

The mechanism is hidden deep in CLR - When new is used with reference types it is converted to "newobj" CIL instruction and for value types it is converted to "initobj"

Edit: This makes a perfect interview trick question

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2  
C# structs are not anything like C++ structs. –  Earlz May 14 '10 at 7:46
4  
Funny, I thought this was an implementation detail. –  Brian May 14 '10 at 13:07

Just discovered yet another answer. If you take two types FromType and ToType, with a conversion from FromType to ToType, then foreach has an interesting behavior:

foreach (ToType entry in collection)

works beautifully when collection has a known element type (e.g., List<FromType>). However, it fails with an InvalidCastException if collection doesn't know its element type (e.g., IEnumerable).

This little gem is courtesy of Bill Wagner; see Item 3 in Effective C#. The behavior is a holdover from the pre-generics .NET days...

Full repro code:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Program
{
    public sealed class FromType
    {
    }

    public sealed class ToType
    {
        public static explicit operator ToType(FromType from)
        {
            return new ToType();
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var test1 = new List<FromType>() { new FromType() };

        try
        {
            foreach (ToType entry in test1)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Cast OK.");
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);
        }

        IEnumerable test2 = test1;
        try
        {
            foreach (ToType entry in test2)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Cast OK.");
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}
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    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        Control.ControlCollection controls1 = this.Controls;

        controls1.Add(new Button());
        controls1.Add(new Button());

        ControlCollection controls2 = new ControlCollection(new Form());

        controls2.Add(new Button());
        controls2.Add(new Button());

        ControlCollection controls3 = new ControlCollection(new Form());

        foreach (Control item in controls1)
        {
            controls3.Add(item);
        }

        foreach (Control item in controls2)
        {
            controls3.Add(item);
        }

   }

After execution:

controls1.Count = 1

controls2.Count = 2

controls3.Count = 3

Now replace:

Control.ControlCollection controls1 = this.Controls;

with:

ControlCollection controls1 = new ControlCollection(this);

After execution:

controls1.Count = 2

controls2.Count = 2

controls3.Count = 4

Lesson?

System.Windows.Forms.Form.ControlCollection != 
System.Windows.Forms.Control.ControlCollection
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I'm fond of CompilerParameters.GenerateInMemory (System.CodeDom.Compiler), which doesn't, at least with the C# CodeProvider

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Another "oldie but a goodie": ICollection.IsSynchronized; its documentation defines a "thread-safe collection" as one that is not thread-safe during enumeration.

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Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.Trim() doesn't always return the same value as "string".Trim()

The VB method will only remove actual space characters(from hitting the space key), while the other function will remove all the other white space characters(carriage returns, etc) with it.

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5  
I imagine that's why it's in the VisualBasic namespace, where methods that are backwards-compatible with VB6 go to die... –  Joel Mueller May 14 '10 at 18:12
    
Joel: Haha, probably. But it sure tripped me up since I had no idea they worked differently. –  rossisdead May 14 '10 at 20:03

String.IsNullOrEmpty(" ") returns false. Once could argue or easily believe it should return true.

Something like String.IsNullOrEmptyOrWhitespaceOnly(string) would be nifty, if the name could be shorter.

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3  
I would seem my wish has been fulfilled. I just discovered that .NET 4 includes the new static method string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace() which returns true for null, empty or whitespace only strings. Whitespace is defined as characters that return true when passed to char.IsWhiteSpace(). msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Matthew Sposato May 21 '10 at 14:34

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