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Is there a way in python without wrapping a function call like following?

Original Broken Code:

from sys import stdout
from copy import copy
save_stdout = copy(stdout)
stdout = open('trash','w')
foo()
stdout = save_stdout

Edit: Corrected code from Alex Martelli

import sys
save_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = open('trash', 'w')
foo()
sys.stdout = save_stdout

That way works but appears to be terribly inefficient. There has to be a better way... I would appreciate any insight I can get into this.

share|improve this question
    
I'd say you should leave it uncorrected, since Alex already did it for you. It would make more sense to who is reading. –  Cawas May 13 '10 at 22:12
    
Cawas: I am going to add my initial uncorrected one back above it. Or something similar with the same errors. Good call –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 22:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Assigning the stdout variable as you're doing has no effect whatsoever, assuming foo contains print statements -- yet another example of why you should never import stuff from inside a module (as you're doing here), but always a module as a whole (then use qualified names). The copy is irrelevant, by the way. The correct equivalent of your snippet is:

import sys
save_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = open('trash', 'w')
foo()
sys.stdout = save_stdout

Now, when the code is correct, is the time to make it more elegant or fast. For example, you could use an in-memory file-like object instead of file 'trash':

import sys
import cStringIO
save_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = cStringIO.StringIO()
foo()
sys.stdout = save_stdout

for elegance, a context is best, e.g:

import contextlib
import sys
import cStringIO

@contextlib.contextmanager
def nostdout():
    save_stdout = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = cStringIO.StringIO()
    yield
    sys.stdout = save_stdout

once you have defined this context, for any block in which you don't want a stdout,

with nostdout():
    foo()

More optimization: you just need to replace sys.stdout with an object that has a no-op write method. For example:

import contextlib
import sys

class DummyFile(object):
    def write(self, x): pass

@contextlib.contextmanager
def nostdout():
    save_stdout = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = DummyFile()
    yield
    sys.stdout = save_stdout

to be used the same way as the previous implementation of nostdout. I don't think it gets any cleaner or faster than this;-).

share|improve this answer
    
Good call, sorry, I make lots of mistakes, I am a test as I go guy, very seldom get it right on first try –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 17:51
    
Alex Martelli: that last one seems too pretty. I never have used the "with" keyword before. I am going to have to look into it. –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 17:56
6  
It should be noted that if you use this in a threaded environment, your substitution will apply to all threads. So if you use it in a threaded webserver for instance, stdout will get trashed for all threads (for the duration of that function call, which will be some random chunk of time in other threads). Handling this case is hard, and would involve threading.local (mostly I'd recommend try avoiding threads and stdout redirection). –  Ian Bicking May 13 '10 at 21:12
    
Google Code Jam last week, and posting on stack overflow is humbling, I didn't even think about that. Very valid point. –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 21:14

Why do you think this is inefficient? Did you test it? By the way, it does not work at all because you are using the from ... import statement. Replacing sys.stdout is fine, but don't make a copy and don't use a temporary file. Open the null device instead:

import sys
import os

def foo():
    print "abc"

old_stdout = sys.stdout
sys.stdout = open(os.devnull)
try:
    foo()
finally:
    sys.stdout.close()
    sys.stdout = old_stdout
share|improve this answer
    
The only reason I think it is inefficient because it is a file write. File writes are definitely slower than needed if you are doing it enough times. But yeah I messed up my initial code, I fixed it based of Alex's initial comment –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 17:58
2  
It should be open(os.devnull, 'w'). In general os.devnull is useful if you need real file object. But print accepts anything with a write() method. –  J.F. Sebastian May 14 '10 at 7:58
    
+1 for os.devnull.. surprised the winning answer propagated the use of an actual file for output. –  synthesizerpatel Sep 25 '12 at 1:26
    
Indeed it should be open(os.devnull, 'w'). Otherwise you will get:[Errno 9] Bad file descriptor –  danger89 Mar 11 at 18:14

A slight modification to Alex Martelli's answer...

This addresses the case where you always want to suppress stdout for a function instead of individual calls to the function.

If foo() was called many times would it might be better/easier to wrap the function (decorate it). This way you change the definition of foo once instead of encasing every use of the function in a with-statement.

import sys
from somemodule import foo

class DummyFile(object):
    def write(self, x): pass

def nostdout(func):
    def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):        
        save_stdout = sys.stdout
        sys.stdout = DummyFile()
        func(*args, **kwargs)
        sys.stdout = save_stdout
    return wrapper

foo = nostdout(foo)
share|improve this answer
    
tgray: I really like that approach. Is it truly faster? It can save a little bit of time via not doing I guess two jmps and less pushing and pulling from the stack. That and I can over-call all the functions I will call. Is their another hidden advantage that I am not seeing? –  Tim McJilton May 13 '10 at 20:10
    
Tim: It's main benefit is saving programmer time by reducing the number of changes you need to make to your code to turn off stdout for a function. I haven't run a performance test against the contextmanager yet. –  tgray May 14 '10 at 14:57
    
tgray: Thats what I thought. It is a great Idea though. I do like it. I think both approaches are good depending on what you are attempting to do. IE if you are trying to replace a call in 100s of spot that way is better, but if you want to do it for a function being passed into another function, I think the other has its advantages. I do like it though –  Tim McJilton May 14 '10 at 15:08
    
tgray: Random note. After timing the two ways wrapping a function that just does 1+1, because i only care to look at the overhead. That being said it was pretty much a wash. So which ever between the two styles is easiest to implement is the one to go for. –  Tim McJilton May 14 '10 at 18:22

By generalizing even more, you can get a nice decorator that can capture the ouput and even return it:

import sys
import cStringIO
from functools import wraps

def mute(returns_output=False):
    """
        Decorate a function that prints to stdout, intercepting the output.
        If "returns_output" is True, the function will return a generator
        yielding the printed lines instead of the return values.

        The decorator litterally hijack sys.stdout during each function
        execution for ALL THE THREADS, so be careful with what you apply it to
        and in which context.

        >>> def numbers():
            print "42"
            print "1984"
        ...
        >>> numbers()
        42
        1984
        >>> mute()(numbers)()
        >>> list(mute(True)(numbers)())
        ['42', '1984']

    """

    def decorator(func):

        @wraps(func)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):

            saved_stdout = sys.stdout
            sys.stdout = cStringIO.StringIO()

            try:
                out = func(*args, **kwargs)
                if returns_output:
                    out = sys.stdout.getvalue().strip().split()
            finally:
                sys.stdout = saved_stdout

            return out

        return wrapper

    return decorator
share|improve this answer

I don't think it gets any cleaner or faster than this;-)

Bah! I think I can do a little better :-D

import contextlib, cStringIO, sys

@contextlib.contextmanager
def nostdout():

    '''Prevent print to stdout, but if there was an error then catch it and
    print the output before raising the error.'''

    saved_stdout = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = cStringIO.StringIO()
    try:
        yield
    except Exception:
        saved_output = sys.stdout
        sys.stdout = saved_stdout
        print saved_output.getvalue()
        raise
    sys.stdout = saved_stdout

Which gets to what I wanted originally, to suppress output normally but to show the suppressed output if an error was thrown.

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