Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I regularly need to delete all the data from my postgresql database before a rebuild. How would I do this directly in SQL?

At the moment I've managed to come up with a SQL statement that returns all the commands I need to execute:

SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' ||  tablename || ';' FROM pg_tables WHERE tableowner='MYUSER';

but I cant see a way to execute them programatically once I have them...

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 71 down vote accepted

FrustratedWithFormsDesigner is correct, PL/pgSQL can do this. Here's the script:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(username IN VARCHAR) RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    statements CURSOR FOR
        SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables
        WHERE tableowner = username AND schemaname = 'public';
BEGIN
    FOR stmt IN statements LOOP
        EXECUTE 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(stmt.tablename) || ' CASCADE;';
    END LOOP;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

This creates a stored function (you need to do this just once) which you can afterwards use like this:

SELECT truncate_tables('MYUSER');

HTH!

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for actually writing the script –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner May 13 '10 at 19:37
1  
Had to rejig a little but after that it worked like a charm! I've never used plpgsql before so this would've taken me ages. Thanks! For anyone that needs it I've added the code I ended up using to the bottom of this post. –  Aaron May 13 '10 at 21:32
    
Sorry, I was probably thinking in Oracle PL/SQL :( I fixed the syntax error in my code above. –  Henning May 14 '10 at 13:18
1  
you can also move the SELECT statement directly to FOR loop. DECLARE r RECORD; then for loop: FOR r IN SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables LOOP –  Michael Buen May 14 '10 at 13:55
5  
I would add CASCADE to TRUNCATE TABLE –  Bogdan Gusiev May 20 '10 at 11:35

Explicit cursor syntax is rarely needed at all in plpgsql. It's simpler to use the implicit cursor of a FOR LOOP in plpgsql:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(_username text)
  RETURNS void AS
$func$
DECLARE
   tbl text;
BEGIN
   FOR tbl IN 
      SELECT t.tablename
      FROM   pg_tables t
      WHERE  t.tableowner = _username
      AND    t.schemaname = 'public'
   LOOP
      EXECUTE 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(tbl) || ' CASCADE';
   END LOOP;
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Also, you can TRUNCATE multiple tables at once.
Aggregate all table names and execute a single statement. Simpler, faster:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(_username text)
  RETURNS void AS
$func$
BEGIN
   EXECUTE (
      SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE '
             || string_agg(quote_ident(t.tablename), ', ')
             || ' CASCADE'
      FROM   pg_tables t
      WHERE  t.tableowner = _username
      AND    t.schemaname = 'public'
   );
END
$func$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT truncate_tables('postgres');

Be very careful with a function like that. It nukes your database.

Refined query

You don't even need a function for that. Since PostgreSQL 9.0, you can execute dynamic commands with a DO statement:

DO
$func$
BEGIN
   EXECUTE (
      SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE '
             || string_agg(quote_ident(t.tablename), ', ')
             || ' CASCADE'
      FROM   pg_tables t
      WHERE  t.schemaname = 'public'
      -- AND t.tableowner = 'postgres' -- optionaly restrict to one user
   );
END
$func$;

For repeated use

It might be simpler (and faster!) to create a "template" database (let's name it my_template) with your vanilla structure and all empty tables. Then go through a DROP / CREATE DATABASE cycle:

DROP DATABASE mydb;
CREATE DATABASE mydb TEMPLATE my_template;

This is extremely fast, because PostgreSQL copies the whole structure on the file level. No concurrency issues or other overhead slowing you down.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for TRUNCATE multiple tables at once. –  pevik Oct 29 at 9:24

In this case it would probably be better to just have an empty database that you use as a template and when you need to refresh, drop the existing database and create a new one from the template.

share|improve this answer

Could you use dynamic SQL to execute each statement in turn? You would probably have to write a PL/pgSQL script to do this.

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/8.3/static/plpgsql-statements.html (section 38.5.4. Executing Dynamic Commands)

share|improve this answer

Slightly adapted...

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION truncate_tables(username IN VARCHAR) RETURNS void AS $$
DECLARE
    stmt RECORD;
    statements CURSOR FOR SELECT tablename FROM pg_tables WHERE tableowner = username;
BEGIN
    FOR stmt IN statements LOOP
        EXECUTE 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || quote_ident(stmt.tablename) || ' CASCADE;';
    END LOOP;
END;                         
$$ LANGUAGE 'plpgsql';
share|improve this answer
    
Why suppressing the AND schemaname = 'public' ? what is the benefit ? –  Stephane Rolland Aug 22 '12 at 9:29

You can do this with bash also:

#!/bin/bash
PGPASSWORD='' psql -h 127.0.0.1 -Upostgres sng --tuples-only --command "SELECT 'TRUNCATE TABLE ' || schemaname || '.' ||  tablename || ';' FROM pg_tables WHERE schemaname in ('cms_test', 'ids_test', 'logs_test', 'sps_test');" | 
tr "\\n" " " | 
xargs -I{} psql -h 127.0.0.1 -Upostgres sng --command "{}"

You will need to adjust schema names, passwords and usernames to match your schemas.

share|improve this answer

If i have to do this, i will simply create a schema sql of current db, then drop & create db, then load db with schema sql.

Below are steps involved:

1) Create Schema dump of database (--schema-only)

pg_dump mydb -s > schema.sql

2) Drop database

drop database mydb;

3) Create Database

create database mydb;

4) Import Schema

psql mydb < schema.sql

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.