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I'm very new to Python and multithreaded programming in general. Basically, I have a script that will copy files to another location. I would like this to be placed in another thread so I can output .... to indicate that the script is still running.

The problem that I am having is that if the files cannot be copied it will throw an exception. This is ok if running in the main thread; however, having the following code does not work:

try:
    threadClass = TheThread(param1, param2, etc.)
    threadClass.start()   ##### **Exception takes place here**
except:
    print "Caught an exception"

In the thread class itself, I tried to re-throw the exception, but it does not work. I have seen people on here ask similar questions, but they all seem to be doing something more specific than what I am trying to do (and I don't quite understand the solutions offered). I have seen people mention the usage of sys.exc_info(), however I do not know where or how to use it.

All help is greatly appreciated!

EDIT: The code for the thread class is below:

class TheThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, sourceFolder, destFolder):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.sourceFolder = sourceFolder
        self.destFolder = destFolder

    def run(self):
        try:
           shul.copytree(self.sourceFolder, self.destFolder)
        except:
           raise
share|improve this question
    
Can you provide more insight into what is happening inside of TheThread? Code sample perhaps? –  jathanism May 13 '10 at 18:43
    
Sure. I'll edit my response above to include some details. –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 18:44
1  
Have you considered switching it round so the main Thread is the bit that does stuff and the progress indicator is in the spawned Thread? –  Dan Head May 13 '10 at 19:00
1  
Dan Head, are you referring to the main thread first spawning the "..." function and then running the copy function? That could work and avoid the exception issue. But, I'd still like to learn how to properly thread in python. –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 19:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted

The problem is that thread_obj.start() returns immediately. The child thread that you spawned executes in its own context, with its own stack. Any exception that occurs there is in the context of the child thread, and it is in its own stack. One way I can think of right now to communicate this information to the parent thread is by using some sort of message passing, so you might look into that.

Try this on for size:

import sys
import threading
import Queue


class ExcThread(threading.Thread):

    def __init__(self, bucket):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.bucket = bucket

    def run(self):
        try:
            raise Exception('An error occured here.')
        except Exception:
            self.bucket.put(sys.exc_info())


def main():
    bucket = Queue.Queue()
    thread_obj = ExcThread(bucket)
    thread_obj.start()

    while True:
        try:
            exc = bucket.get(block=False)
        except Queue.Empty:
            pass
        else:
            exc_type, exc_obj, exc_trace = exc
            # deal with the exception
            print exc_type, exc_obj
            print exc_trace

        thread_obj.join(0.1)
        if thread_obj.isAlive():
            continue
        else:
            break


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like it will work. I will need to try this when I get a chance. For now, I'm marking your post as the answer. Thank you! –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 23:17
    
I just tried this, and it does work. Thank you! :) –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 23:40
1  
Why not joining the thread instead of this ugly while loop? See the multiprocessing equivalent: gist.github.com/2311116 –  schlamar Dec 11 '12 at 14:03
1  
Why not using the EventHook pattern stackoverflow.com/questions/1092531/event-system-in-python/… based on @Lasse answer? Rather than the loop thing? –  Andre Miras Jan 22 at 23:01

You have to think of threads in terms of phone calls.

Consider this.

You call up the local city council and ask a question. While they find the answer for you, you hold. When they have the answer, they'll tell it to you, and then you hang up. If for some reason they can't find the answer (exception), they will tell you that.

This is how a synchronous, normal, method call works. You call a method, when it returns, you have the answer (good or bad.)

However, a thread goes more like this:

You call up the local city council and ask a question, and ask them to call you back when they have the answer. You then hang up.

At this point, you don't know if they will find the answer or not, so any attempt, now, to try to handle the result of the inquiry, will fail, as you simply don't have the results yet.

Instead, you have to react to the incoming call, and take the news, good or bad, and then process it.

In terms of your code, you need to have code that reacts to your thread failing, and logs or processes the exception. The code you have in your question, which you say doesn't work, is just like trying to process the results of the phone call right after hanging up, when you still don't have the answer.

share|improve this answer
8  
That is perhaps one of the best explanations of multithreading I have ever read. If my reputation were higher, I would definitely uprank your post. –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 23:16

Although it is not possible to directly catch an exception thrown in a different thread, here's a code to quite transparently obtain something very close to this functionality. Your child thread must subclass the ExThread class instead of threading.Thread and the parent thread must call the child_thread.join_with_exception() method instead of child_thread.join() when waiting for the thread to finish its job.

Technical details of this implementation: when the child thread throws an exception, it is passed to the parent through a Queue and thrown again in the parent thread. Notice that there's no busy waiting in this approach .

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
import threading
import Queue

class ExThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.__status_queue = Queue.Queue()

    def run_with_exception(self):
        """This method should be overriden."""
        raise NotImplementedError

    def run(self):
        """This method should NOT be overriden."""
        try:
            self.run_with_exception()
        except Exception:
            self.__status_queue.put(sys.exc_info())
        self.__status_queue.put(None)

    def wait_for_exc_info(self):
        return self.__status_queue.get()

    def join_with_exception(self):
        ex_info = self.wait_for_exc_info()
        if ex_info is None:
            return
        else:
            raise ex_info[1]

class MyException(Exception):
    pass

class MyThread(ExThread):
    def __init__(self):
        ExThread.__init__(self)

    def run_with_exception(self):
        thread_name = threading.current_thread().name
        raise MyException("An error in thread '{}'.".format(thread_name))

def main():
    t = MyThread()
    t.start()
    try:
        t.join_with_exception()
    except MyException as ex:
        thread_name = threading.current_thread().name
        print "Caught a MyException in thread '{}': {}".format(thread_name, ex)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer

The concurrent.futures module makes it simple to do work in separate threads (or processes) and handle any resulting exceptions:

import concurrent.futures
import shutil

def copytree_with_dots(src_path, dst_path):
    with concurrent.futures.ThreadPoolExecutor(max_workers=1) as executor:
        # Execute the copy on a separate thread,
        # creating a future object to track progress.
        future = executor.submit(shutil.copytree, src_path, dst_path)

        while future.running():
            # Print pretty dots here.
            pass

        # Return the value returned by shutil.copytree(), None.
        # Raise any exceptions raised during the copy process.
        return future.result()

concurrent.futures is included with Python 3.2, and is available as the backported futures module for earlier versions.

share|improve this answer

If an exception occurs in a thread, the best way is to re-throw it in the caller thread during join. Extend ExcThread (below), overriding excRun (instead of run).

import threading

class ExcThread(threading.Thread):
  def excRun(self):
    pass

  def run(self):
    self.exc = None
    try:
      self.excRun()
    except:
      import sys
      self.exc = sys.exc_info()

  def join(self):
    threading.Thread.join(self)
    if self.exc:
      msg = "Thread '%s' threw an exception: %s" % (self.getName(), self.exc[1])
      new_exc = Exception(msg)
      raise new_exc.__class__, new_exc, self.exc[2]
share|improve this answer

As a noobie to Threading, it took me a long time to understand how to implement Mateusz Kobos's code (above). Here's a clarified version to help understand how to use it.

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
import threading
import Queue

class ExThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.__status_queue = Queue.Queue()

    def run_with_exception(self):
        """This method should be overriden."""
        raise NotImplementedError

    def run(self):
        """This method should NOT be overriden."""
        try:
            self.run_with_exception()
        except Exception:
            self.__status_queue.put(sys.exc_info())
        self.__status_queue.put(None)

    def wait_for_exc_info(self):
        return self.__status_queue.get()

    def join_with_exception(self):
        ex_info = self.wait_for_exc_info()
        if ex_info is None:
            return
        else:
            raise ex_info[1]

class MyException(Exception):
    pass

class MyThread(ExThread):
    def __init__(self):
        ExThread.__init__(self)

    # This overrides the "run_with_exception" from class "ExThread"
    # Note, this is where the actual thread to be run lives. The thread
    # to be run could also call a method or be passed in as an object
    def run_with_exception(self):
        # Code will function until the int
        print "sleeping 5 seconds"
        import time
        for i in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5:
            print i
            time.sleep(1) 
        # Thread should break here
        int("str")
# I'm honestly not sure why these appear here? So, I removed them. 
# Perhaps Mateusz can clarify?        
#         thread_name = threading.current_thread().name
#         raise MyException("An error in thread '{}'.".format(thread_name))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    # The code lives in MyThread in this example. So creating the MyThread 
    # object set the code to be run (but does not start it yet)
    t = MyThread()
    # This actually starts the thread
    t.start()
    print
    print ("Notice 't.start()' is considered to have completed, although" 
           " the countdown continues in its new thread. So you code "
           "can tinue into new processing.")
    # Now that the thread is running, the join allows for monitoring of it
    try:
        t.join_with_exception()
    # should be able to be replace "Exception" with specific error (untested)
    except Exception, e: 
        print
        print "Exceptioon was caught and control passed back to the main thread"
        print "Do some handling here...or raise a custom exception "
        thread_name = threading.current_thread().name
        e = ("Caught a MyException in thread: '" + 
             str(thread_name) + 
             "' [" + str(e) + "]")
        raise Exception(e) # Or custom class of exception, such as MyException
share|improve this answer

Using naked excepts is not a good practice because you usually catch more than you bargain for.

I would suggest modifying the except to catch ONLY the exception that you would to handle. I don't think that raising it has the desired effect, because when you go to instantiate TheThread in the outer try, if it raises an exception, the assignment is never going to happen.

Instead you might want to just alert on it and move on, such as:

def run(self):
    try:
       shul.copytree(self.sourceFolder, self.destFolder)
    except OSError, err:
       print err

Then when that exception is caught, you can handle it there. Then the outer try catches an exception from TheThread, you know it won't be the one you already handled, and will help you isolate your process flow.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, if there is an error in that thread at all, I want the full program to inform the user that there was an issue and gracefully end. For that reason, I want the main thread to catch and handle all the exceptions. However, the problem still exists where if TheThread throws an exception, the main thread's try/except still won't catch it. I could have the thread detect the exception and return a false indicating that the operation was unsuccessful. That would achieve the same desired result, but I would still like to know how to properly catch a sub-thread exception. –  Phanto May 13 '10 at 19:35

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