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I want to write a Unix shell script that will do various logic if there is a string inside of another string. For example, if I am in a certain folder, branch off. Could someone please tell me how to accomplish this? If possible I would like to make this not shell specific (i.e. not bash only) but if there's no other way I can make do with that.

#!/bin/sh
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

if [ CURRENT_DIR contains "String1" ]
then
 echo "String1 present"
elif [ CURRENT_DIR contains "String2" ]
then
 echo "String2 present"
else
 echo "Else"
fi
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7 Answers 7

Here's yet another solution. This uses POSIX substring parameter expansion, so it works in bash, dash, ksh...

test "${string#*$word}" != "$string" && echo "$word found in $string"

Edit: That's a great idea, C. Ross. Here's a functionalized version with some examples:

# contains(string, substring)
#
# Returns 0 if the specified string contains the specified substring,
# otherwise returns 1.
contains() {
    string="$1"
    substring="$2"
    if test "${string#*$substring}" != "$string"
    then
        return 0    # $substring is in $string
    else
        return 1    # $substring is not in $string
    fi
}

contains "abcd" "e" || echo "abcd does not contain e"
contains "abcd" "ab" && echo "abcd contains ab"
contains "abcd" "bc" && echo "abcd contains bc"
contains "abcd" "cd" && echo "abcd contains cd"
contains "abcd" "abcd" && echo "abcd contains abcd"
contains "" "" && echo "empty string contains empty string"
contains "a" "" && echo "a contains empty string"
contains "" "a" || echo "empty string does not contain a"
contains "abcd efgh" "cd ef" && echo "abcd efgh contains cd ef"
contains "abcd efgh" " " && echo "abcd efgh contains a space"
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Thanks Matt, great answer. I wrapped this up in a function, and found it very useful. –  C. Ross Dec 26 '12 at 18:45

Pure POSIX shell:

#!/bin/sh
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

case "$CURRENT_DIR" in
  *String1*) echo "String1 present" ;;
  *String2*) echo "String2 present" ;;
  *)         echo "else" ;;
esac

Extended shells like ksh or bash have fancy matching mechanisms, but the old-style case is surprisingly powerful.

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Sadly, I am not aware of a way to do this in sh. However, using bash (starting in version 3.0.0, which is probably what you have), you can use the =~ operator like this:

#!/bin/bash
CURRENT_DIR=`pwd`

if [[ CURRENT_DIR =~ "String1" ]]
then
 echo "String1 present"
elif [[ CURRENT_DIR =~ "String2" ]]
then
 echo "String2 present"
else
 echo "Else"
fi

As an added bonus (and/or a warning, if your strings have any funny characters in them), =~ accepts regexes as the right operand if you leave out the quotes.

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1  
Don't quote the regex, or it will not work in general. For example, try [[ test =~ "test.*" ]] vs. [[ test =~ test.* ]]. –  l0b0 Jan 11 '12 at 8:01
1  
Well, it will work just fine if you're testing for a substring, as in the original question, but it won't treat the right operand as a regex. I'll update my answer to make that more clear. –  John Hyland Jun 25 '13 at 0:21

There's bash regexps. Or there's 'expr':

 if expr "$link" : '/.*' > /dev/null; then
    PRG="$link"
  else
    PRG=`dirname "$PRG"`/"$link"
  fi
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case `pwd` in
  *path) echo "ends with path";;
  path*) echo "starts with path";;
  *path*) echo "contains path";;
  *) echo "this is the default";;
esac
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#This script searches a subset string in a string:
#1st arg:reference string
#2nd arg:subset string to be matched

#!/bin/bash
echo $1 | grep $2  1>/dev/null 
if [ `echo $?` -eq 0 ]
then
echo $2 present in $1
else 
echo $2 not present in $1
fi
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See the manpage for the 'test' program. If you're just testing for the existence of a directory you would normally do something like so:

if test -d "String1"; then
  echo "String1 present"
end

If you're actually trying to match a string you can use bash expansion rules & wildcards as well:

if test -d String*"; then
  echo "A directory starting with 'String' is present"
end

If you need to do something more complex you'll need to use another program like expr.

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