Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<html>
  <body>
    <style type="text/css">
      p.first {color:blue}
      p.second {color:green}
    </style>

    <p class="first">Hello World</p>
    <p class="second">Hello World</p>

    <style type="text/css">
      p.first {color:green}
      p.second {color:blue}
    </style>

    <p class="first">Hello World</p>
    <p class="second">Hello World</p>
  </body>
</html>

How is a browser supposed to render css which is non contiguous? Is it supposed to generate some data structure using all the css styles on a page and use that for rendering?

Or does it render using style information in the order it sees?

share|improve this question
1  
I'd say it is undefined behavior as it is not valid HTML. For more information which elements are valid and which are not: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML_element –  Felix Kling May 13 '10 at 21:07
1  
This question should be retitled to "<style> tags in <body>?" –  Dolph May 13 '10 at 21:10
2  
Putting aside this problem, it is a bad practice to mix up CSS and HTML. –  0x2D9A3 May 13 '10 at 21:33

8 Answers 8

As others have already mentioned, HTML 4 requires the <style> tag to be placed in the <head> section (even though most browsers allow <style> tags within the body).

However, HTML 5 includes the scoped attribute, which allows you to create style sheets that are scoped within the parent element of the <style> tag. This also enables you to place <style> tags within the <body> element:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head></head>
<body>

<div id = "scoped-content">
    <style type = "text/css" scoped>
    h1 { color: red }; 
    </style>

    <h1>Hello</h1>
</div>

<h1>World</h1>

</body>
</html>

If you render the above code in an HTML-5 enabled browser that supports scoped, you will see the limited scope of the style sheet.

There's just one major caveat...

At the time I'm writing this answer (May, 2013) almost no mainstream browser currently supports the scoped attribute. (Although apparently developer builds of Chromium support it.)

HOWEVER, there is an interesting implication of the scoped attribute that pertains to this question. It means that future browsers are mandated via the standard to allow <style> elements within the <body> (as long as the <style> elements are scoped.)

So, given that:

  • Almost every existing browser currently ignores the scoped attribute
  • Almost every existing browser currently allows <style> tags within the <body>
  • Future implementations will be required to allow (scoped) <style> tags within the <body>

...then there is literally no harm* in placing <style> tags within the body, as long as you future proof them with a scoped attribute. The only problem is that current browsers won't actually limit the scope of the stylesheet - they'll apply it to the whole document. But the point is that, for all practical purposes, you can include <style> tags within the <body> provided that you:

  • Future-proof your HTML by including the scoped attribute
  • Understand that as of now, the stylesheet within the <body> will not actually be scoped (because no mainstream browser support exists yet)


* except of course, for pissing off HTML validators...


Finally, regarding the common (but subjective) claim that embedding CSS within HTML is poor practice, it should be noted that the whole point of the scoped attribute is to accommodate typical modern development frameworks that allow developers to import chunks of HTML as modules or syndicated content. It is very convenient to have embedded CSS that only applies to a particular chunk of HTML, in order to develop encapsulated, modular components with specific stylings.

share|improve this answer
1  
I know you said there is no harm, in placing <style> tags in the body, except that it will cause the page to possibly render one way, then change it's appearance shortly there after. You may see a flash of the page unstyled, then styled correctly. It also forces the browser to do repaints and reflows which slows down the rendering of the page. When browsers support the scoped attribute, and you use it, it prevents this because the browser knows that the section that it refers to hasn't been rendered yet, so it doesn't have to go back and see if any already rendered elements are affected –  Robert McKee May 30 '13 at 20:58
    
@Robert McKee, this shouldn't be an issue if you follow the logic of the scoped attribute and limit your use of scoped CSS styles to elements within the scope which appear after the <style scoped> element. –  Charles Salvia May 30 '13 at 21:00
1  
@RobertMcKee: have you actually tested that? I'd expect that usually the entire html page (including all inline style) is parsed before rendering, since usually it's not huge and browsers wait a (very short) while before rendering precisely to avoid the flash-of-unstyled content that might occur due to css linked in the head. If this is your only css, and if the page is large and if the network connection isn't very fast, then maybe you'll see a flash of unstyled content, but it'd surprise me in most practical situations. –  Eamon Nerbonne Aug 26 '13 at 11:04
1  
@NickG Because almost no browsers wait for the entire HTML file before they start rendering. You do NOT need to build the DOM tree in it's entirety before you can do things with it. Both of your statements are incorrect. –  Robert McKee Apr 25 '14 at 15:31
1  
Sorry, you're correct. I was misinformed. :/ In practice though, they do wait for a quite a while, so unless the site is slow you're very unlikely to see a flash of unstyled content. I also can't reproduce this on my own machine. If I force a delay, the page is simply blank. But perhaps a process or plugin is interfering with the HTML download. –  NickG Apr 25 '14 at 15:49

The <style> tag belongs in the <head> section, seperate from all the content.

References: W3C Specs and W3Schools

Side note: Where is your DOCTYPE?!

share|improve this answer
6  
The doctype article you referenced is really old; so for future reference the HTML 5 doctype is <!DOCTYPE html> ejohn.org/blog/html5-doctype –  Chris Lively Mar 28 '13 at 22:18

I guess this will vary from browser to browser: The global display rules will probably be updated as the browser goes along through the code.

You can see such changes in the global display rules sometimes when an external style sheet is loaded with a delay. Something similar might happen here but in such short succession that it doesn't actually get rendered.

It's not valid HTML anyway, so I'd say that it is a futile thing to think about. <style> tags belong in the head section of the page.

share|improve this answer

Not valid HTML, anyway pretty much every browser seems to consider just the second instance.

Tested under the last versions of FF and Google Chrome under Fedora, and FF, Opera, IE, and Chrome under XP.

share|improve this answer

In your example, a browser isn't "supposed" to do anything. The HTML is invalid. Either error recovery is triggered, or the parser makes of it as it will.

In a valid instance, multiple stylesheets are just treated as appearing one after the other, the cascade is calculated as normal.

share|improve this answer

When I see that the big-site Content Management Systems routinely put some <style> elements (some, not all) close to the content that relies on those classes, I conclude that the horse is out of the barn.

Go look at page sources from cnn.com, nytimes.com, huffingtonpost.com, your nearest big-city newspaper, etc. All of them do this.

If there's a good reason to put an extra <style> section somewhere in the body -- for instance if you're include()ing diverse and independent page elements in real time and each has an embedded <style> of its own, and the organization will be cleaner, more modular, more understandable, and more maintainable -- I say just bite the bullet. Sure it would be better if we could have "local" style with restricted scope, like local variables, but you go to work with the HTML you have, not the HTML you might want or wish to have at a later time.

Of course there are potential drawbacks and good (if not always compelling) reasons to follow the orthodoxy, as others have elaborated. But to me it looks more and more like thoughtful use of <style> in <body> has already gone mainstream.

share|improve this answer

As others have said, this isn't valid html as the style tags belong in the head.

However, most browsers dont' really enforce that validation. Instead, once the document is loaded then the styles are merged and applied. In this case the second set of styles will always override the first because they were the last definitions encountered.

share|improve this answer

Because this is HTML is not valid does not have any affect on the outcome ... it just means that the HTML does adhere to the standard (merely for organizational purposes). For the sake of being valid it could have been written this way:

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
  p.first {color:blue}
  p.second {color:green}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<p class="first" style="color:green;">Hello World</p>
<p class="second" style="color:blue;">Hello World</p>

My guess is that the browser applies the last style it comes across.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.