Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Looking for some help with a Regular Expression to do the following:

  • Must be Alpha Char
  • Must be at least 1 Char
  • Must NOT be a specific value, e.g. != "Default"

Thanks for any help, Dave

share|improve this question
1  
Smells like homework. –  JSBձոգչ May 13 '10 at 21:10
    
@JS Bangs: Why do you think it is homework? –  Mark Byers May 13 '10 at 21:12
2  
What language/regex variant are you using? –  Mark Byers May 13 '10 at 21:12
    
By 'alpha' do you mean alphabetical or alphanumerical? Do you mean 'a-z' or should this work with foreign alphabetic characters too? –  Mark Byers May 13 '10 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

Use a negative lookahead:

^(?!Default)[a-zA-Z]+$
share|improve this answer
    
Definately not homework - Maybe my kids will have this as homework someday! Thanks for the help Mark. Dave –  Dave May 13 '10 at 21:18
    
that solution is OK if you have a single specific value, but if you're comparing to a list of specific values (eg: dictionary words) the solution becomes untenable. –  Bryan Oakley Jul 9 '11 at 5:32

Solve this in two steps:

  1. compare against the regular expression [a-zA-Z]+ which means "one or more of the letters from a-z or A-Z
  2. if it passes that test, look it up in a list of specific values you are guarding against.

There's no point in trying to cram these two tests into a single complex regular expression that you don't understand. A good rule of thumb with regular expressions is, if you have to ask someone how to do it, you should strive to use the least complex solution possible. If you don't understand the regular expression you won't be able to maintain the code over time.

In pseudocode:

if regexp_matches('[a-zA-Z]+', string) && string not in ['Default', 'Foobar', ...] {
    print "it's a keeper!"
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.