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I'd like to use FactoryBeans and scopes together. Specifically, I'd like the object created and returned by a FactoryBean to be placed into a specified (perhaps custom) scope. The issue is that doing the following:

<bean class="x.y.z.TestFactoryBean" scope="test" />

Results in the FactoryBean itself being scoped, and has somewhat unpredictable behaviour on the object created by the factory. I understand why this is; the factory itself is a first-class spring-managed bean, and has its own lifecycle. However, I can't find a way to specify that the object returned from the factory should itself be scoped.

On the other hand, this does exactly what I want (as long as TestFactoryBean does NOT implement the FactoryBean interface):

<bean class="x.y.z.TestFactoryBean" name="testFactory">
<bean class="x.y.z.TestBean" factory-bean="testFactory" 
      factory-method="getObject" scope="test" />

So the real question is, how can I make Spring behave like it does for the 2nd example above, but using real FactoryBeans?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't easily use a custom scope on a bean returned from a FactoryBean.

From Spring's Java documentation:

FactoryBeans can support singletons and prototypes

If you want the FactoryBean's returned bean to have the prototype scope, then you must implement the isSingleton() method like this:

public class TestFactoryBean implements FactoryBean<TestBean> {

  // the rest of the required methods are removed for simplicity reasons..

  public boolean isSingleton() {
        return false;
    }
}

To support a custom scope, you have to implement the logic yourself and it will not be very intuitive, since the FactoryBean only provides the isSingleton() method. I will rather recommend using another solution than FactoryBean for beans with custom scope.

Hope this helps!

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1  
you can customize pretty much everything in spring, so I guess it is possible somehow, but it will probably involve some very deep digging (using a custom applicationcontext) or something like that. but I'm guessing here –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 17 '10 at 19:42
    
I agree and have updated my answer. –  Espen May 25 '10 at 19:01

I solved the same issue using custom holder bean.

Factory bean:

@Component
@Configurable()
public class EventBusFactory implements FactoryBean<EventBus> {
    @Override
    public EventBus getObject() throws Exception {
        return new SimpleEventBus();
    }

    @Override
    public Class<?> getObjectType() {
        return EventBus.class;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isSingleton() {
        return false;
    }
}

Bean holder:

@Configurable
@Component
@Scope("session")
public class EventBusHolder {

    @Autowired
    private EventBus eventBus;

    public EventBus getEventBus() {
        return eventBus;
    }

    public void setEventBus(EventBus eventBus) {
        this.eventBus = eventBus;
    }
}

And then I use holder instead of the required entity.

@Component
@Configurable
@Scope("session")
public class UicPlaceController extends PlaceController {

    @Autowired
    public UicPlaceController(EventBusHolder eventBus) {
        super(eventBus.getEventBus());
    }
    ...
 }

The solution looks a little bit ugly, but still, it solves the issue.

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I guess that this work with Holder can be improved, but for now it works me. –  uthark Dec 30 '11 at 5:19

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