Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this expression as a "selection" control structure on integer "x": 0 < x < 10, with the intention that the structure returns TRUE if "x" is in the range 1..9.

  1. Explain why a compiler should not accept this expression. (In particular, what are the issues regarding the binary operator "<"?
  2. Explain how a prefix operator could be introduced so the expression can be successfully processed.
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by HaskellElephant, Jakob Bowyer, pad, sdcvvc, Joe Oct 2 '12 at 18:48

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
what language? this is valid in Python. –  KennyTM May 13 '10 at 21:19
3  
Having been helping my wife with her CS homework - the way this question is phrased means it is most definitely homework, and a c/p of the homework question at that. –  Broam May 13 '10 at 21:20
    
i can think of the precedence from left to right , so this would read as (0 is less than x)..not sure why that would be a problem..thanks! –  md004 May 13 '10 at 21:20
3  
So what you want to do is rephrase the question so the answer is related to the part you don't understand, and so it's not just copied from your textbook –  willoller May 13 '10 at 21:22
12  
-1, this is obviously a copy-paste from an assignment. No problem in asking help with homework, but simply copy-pasting it verbatim without any explanation of where you're stuck (and hoping for a spoon-feed answer?), is not the way to learn new things, IMO. –  Bart Kiers May 13 '10 at 21:23

5 Answers 5

  1. The expression doesn't read like a binary operation, but resembles a ternary operator. There are 3 parameters to what you have stated with 0 < x < 10, as 0,x, and 10 are all tokens for the parser to interpret, no? If you meant for a pair of < to form a ternary operator that is a different story.

  2. One could view the ternary operation as getting split into a pair of comparisons and each comparison is evaluated with the results combined by an AND operation. That would make sense to my mind.

share|improve this answer
1  
< is a binary operator, the expression is not a binary operation. –  Clifford May 13 '10 at 21:33
    
Ok, corrected terminology in my answer. –  JB King May 13 '10 at 21:42

Consider the return types of the < operator.

share|improve this answer
1  
And specifically, how the expression is evaluated, and in what order. Write down the series of steps that the compiler must take to evaluate the expression, and the value at each one of those steps. –  WhirlWind May 13 '10 at 21:25

I see no reason why this mysterious compiler couldn't transform that expression into:

x > 0 && x < 10 
share|improve this answer
    
I could tell you why, but that would give the answer to the homework! Your expression is not semantically the same; at least not in C or C++ –  Clifford May 13 '10 at 21:31
    
@Clifford, Who said this is C or C++? –  JSBձոգչ May 13 '10 at 21:33
    
@Clifford - Please explain why. (By the way I simply meant to write this in a syntax that most people would understand. I make no claims at being an expert.) –  ChaosPandion May 13 '10 at 21:38
    
@JS Bangs: No one, but the answer is language dependent, so the question is unanswerable unless and until we are told. My point was that ChaosPandion sees "no reason", but one reason might be because it is a C++ compiler. –  Clifford May 13 '10 at 21:44
    
I think that is the point of the question, one might think they are equivalent, but in many programming languages they are not, so the compiler could not "transform" it, you have to write semantically correct code (i.e. it has to mean to the compiler what you intended) not just syntactically correct. I have added an answer that perhaps explains the problem without giving away too much. –  Clifford May 13 '10 at 21:49

The code is syntactically valid in C and C++, but is unlikley to be semantically correct in either language. We are left guessing the language at this time.

When I compiled it as C++ VC++2008 issued a warning which rather gave away the answer, so you might try that. Here's my test code:

int main()
{
    volatile int x = 0 ;
    if( x < x < 10 )
    {
        x = 5 ;
    }
}

When C compilation was used it accepted it silently.

As to why it may be a problem, the compiler interprets the expression as (0 < x) < 10. Hint: what is the type of the left-hand side of the second "<" ?

However this may not be the answer you are looking for, because it seems that you must be referring to a different language if the compiler should not accept it.

share|improve this answer

C++ is happy with it. You can even give it the right semantics:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cassert>

using namespace std;

class Int
{
public:
    int x;
    Int () { }
    Int (int z) : x (z) { }
};

class BoolRange
{
public:
    bool value;
    int left;
    int right;

    BoolRange() : value (false) { }

    BoolRange (bool v, int l, int r)
        : value (v), left (l), right (r) { }

    operator bool ()
    {
        return value;
    }
};

ostream& operator<< (ostream& out, Int i)
{
    return out << i.x;
}

ostream& operator<< (ostream& out, BoolRange b)
{
    return out << b.left << '[' << b.value << ']' << b.right;
}

BoolRange operator< (Int l, Int r)
{
    return BoolRange (l.x < r.x, l.x, r.x);
}

BoolRange operator< (Int l, BoolRange r)
{
    return r.value
        ? BoolRange (l.x < r.left, l.x, r.right)
        : BoolRange ();
}

BoolRange operator< (BoolRange l, Int r)
{
    return l.value
        ? BoolRange (l.right < r.x, l.left, r.x)
        : BoolRange ();
}

BoolRange operator< (BoolRange l, BoolRange r)
{
    return l.value && r.value
        ? BoolRange (l.right < r.left, l.left, r.right)
        : BoolRange ();
}

// Test driven development!
int main ()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i)
    {
        Int v = rand() % 100;
        Int w = rand() % 100;

        if (Int(1) < v < w < Int(10)) // Look here!
        {
            assert (1<v.x && v.x<w.x && w.x<10);
        } else
        {
            assert (1>=v.x || v.x>=w.x || w.x>=10);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.