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I have an form that takes a little while for the server to process. I need to ensure that the user waits and does not attempt to resubmit the form by clicking the button again. I tried using the following jQuery code:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    $("form#my_form").submit(function(){
      $('input').attr('disabled','disabled');
      $('a').attr('disabled','disabled');
       return true;
        })
    });
</script>

When I try this in Firefox everything gets disabled but the form is not submitted with any of the POST data it is supposed to include. I can't use jQuery to submit the form because I need the button to be submitted with the form as there are multiple submit buttons and I determine which was used by which one's value is included in the POST. I need the form to be submitted as it usually is and I need to disable everything right after that happens.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Thanks everyone for all your help! –  Adam May 13 '10 at 23:03
    
possible duplicate of Disabling links to stop double-clicks in JQuery –  Bo Persson Oct 2 '12 at 18:09

12 Answers 12

up vote 116 down vote accepted

I think that your problem is this line:

$('input').attr('disabled','disabled');

You're disabling ALL the inputs, including, I'd guess, the ones whose data the form is supposed to submit.

To disable just the submit button(s), you could do this:

$('button[type=submit], input[type=submit]').attr('disabled',true);

However, I don't think IE will submit the form if even those buttons are disabled. I'd suggest a different approach.

A jQuery plugin to solve it

We just solved this problem with the following code. The trick here is using jQuery's data() to mark the form as already submitted or not. That way, we don't have to mess with the submit buttons, which freaks IE out.

// jQuery plugin to prevent double submission of forms
jQuery.fn.preventDoubleSubmission = function() {
  $(this).on('submit',function(e){
    var $form = $(this);

    if ($form.data('submitted') === true) {
      // Previously submitted - don't submit again
      e.preventDefault();
    } else {
      // Mark it so that the next submit can be ignored
      $form.data('submitted', true);
    }
  });

  // Keep chainability
  return this;
};

Use it like this:

$('form').preventDoubleSubmission();

If there are AJAX forms that should be allowed to submit multiple times per page load, you can give them a class indicating that, then exclude them from your selector like this:

$('form:not(.js-allow-double-submission)').preventDoubleSubmission();
share|improve this answer
1  
Just a pointer - wouldn't it be better to cache the $(this) to a var that = $(this)? –  Stuart.Sklinar Jun 25 '12 at 8:55
2  
@Stuart.Sklinar - good idea. I used $form though - 'form' because it's more descriptive, and the leading $ because by my convention, that means it's a jQuery object. –  Nathan Long Jun 25 '12 at 11:08
    
I agree 100%. A good convention to stick to. –  Stuart.Sklinar Jun 25 '12 at 15:11
8  
When using jquery validate unobtrusive validation better to check if form is valid. if ($(this).valid)) {$form.data('submitted', true);} –  cck Jul 20 '13 at 9:46
1  
@TomášFejfar - you don't have to guess when the request is done; unless the server times out, you should be able to set a callback for request completion. –  Nathan Long Dec 11 '13 at 15:41

Timing approach is wrong - how do you know how long the action will take on client's browser?

How to do it

$('form').submit(function(){
  $(this).find(':submit').attr('disabled','disabled');
});

When form is submitted it will disable all submit buttons inside.

Remember, in Firefox when you disable a button this state will be remembered when you go back in history. To prevent that you have to enable buttons on page load, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 because of the firefox tip, but is there any other option besides enabling buttons on page load? –  Raphael Isidro Feb 26 at 18:07

event.timeStamp doesn't work in Firefox. Returning false is non-standard, you should call event.preventDefault(). And while we're at it, always use braces with a control construct.

To sum up all of the previous answers, here is a plugin that does the job and works cross-browser.

jQuery.fn.preventDoubleSubmission = function() {

    var last_clicked, time_since_clicked;

    jQuery(this).bind('submit', function(event) {

        if(last_clicked) {
            time_since_clicked = jQuery.now() - last_clicked;
        }

        last_clicked = jQuery.now();

        if(time_since_clicked < 2000) {
            // Blocking form submit because it was too soon after the last submit.
            event.preventDefault();
        }

        return true;
    });
};

To address Kern3l, the timing method works for me simply because we're trying to stop a double-click of the submit button. If you have a very long response time to a submission, I recommend replacing the submit button or form with a spinner.

Completely blocking subsequent submissions of the form, as most of the above examples do, has one bad side-effect: if there is a network failure and they want to try to resubmit, they would be unable to do so and would lose the changes they made. This would definitely make an angry user.

share|improve this answer
1  
You're right. You can go the other way around - instantly disable and then, after some long timeout, enable again. Prevents double clicks, allows resubmit, but still allows invalid resubmits for lagging users. –  Ctrl-C Jun 27 '13 at 17:00

...but the form is not submitted with any of the POST data it is supposed to include.

Correct. Disabled form element names/values will not be sent to the server. You should set them as readonly elements.

Also, anchors cannot be disabled like that. You will need to either remove their HREFs (not recommended) or prevent their default behaviour (better way), e.g.:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    $("form#my_form").submit(function(){
      $('input').attr('readonly', true);
      $('input[type=submit]').attr("disabled", "disabled");
      $('a').unbind("click").click(function(e) {
          e.preventDefault();
          // or return false;
      });
    });
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Can the readonly input submit buttons be clicked on? –  Adam May 13 '10 at 22:07
    
@Adam, yes, any attached click handlers will fire. I thought you just wanted to stop them from being modified? –  karim79 May 13 '10 at 22:14
    
@karim79 I don't care if the click handlers get fired, I just want to make sure that the form doesn't get resubmitted by the user clicking another submit button. –  Adam May 13 '10 at 22:15
    
@Adam - no, that won't happen. I my example, I've added $('input[type=submit]').attr("disabled", "disabled"); but my favourite way is to put onclick="this.disabled = 'disabled'" into the submit's onclick. –  karim79 May 13 '10 at 22:21
    
@karim79 I tried that, but then the submit button I'm clicking is not included in the POST. I need it to be included in the POST to determine which button was clicked upon –  Adam May 13 '10 at 22:26

There is a possibility to improve Nathan Long's approach. You can replace the logic for detection of already submitted form with this one:

var lastTime = $(this).data("lastSubmitTime");
if (lastTime && typeof lastTime === "object") {
    var now = new Date();
    if ((now - lastTime) > 2000) // 2000ms
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}
$(this).data("lastSubmitTime", new Date());
return true; // or do an ajax call or smth else
share|improve this answer

If using AJAX to post a form, set async: false should prevent additional submits before the form clears:

$("#form").submit(function(){
    var one = $("#one").val();
    var two = $("#two").val();
    $.ajax({
      type: "POST",
      async: false,  // <------ Will complete submit before allowing further action
      url: "process.php",
      data: "one="+one+"&two="+two+"&add=true",
      success: function(result){
        console.log(result);
        // do something with result
      },
      error: function(){alert('Error!')}
    });
    return false;
   }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Setting <code>asnyc:true</code> is a bad approach because it freezes the browser until the request is complete which beats the essence of AJAX –  Edwin M Feb 19 at 13:11

I think Nathan Long's answer is the way to go. For me, I am using client-side validation, so I just added a condition that the form be valid.

        // jQuery plugin to prevent double submission of forms
        jQuery.fn.preventDoubleSubmission = function () {
            $(this).on('submit', function (e) {
                var $form = $(this);

                if ($form.data('submitted') === true) {
                    // Previously submitted - don't submit again
                    alert('Form already submitted. Please wait.');
                    e.preventDefault();
                } else {
                    // Mark it so that the next submit can be ignored
                    // ADDED requirement that form be valid
                    if($form.valid()) {
                        $form.data('submitted', true);
                    }
                }
            });

            // Keep chainability
            return this;
        };
share|improve this answer

I ended up using ideas from this post to come up with a solution that is pretty similar to AtZako's version.

 jQuery.fn.preventDoubleSubmission = function() {

    var last_clicked, time_since_clicked;

    $(this).bind('submit', function(event){

    if(last_clicked) 
      time_since_clicked = event.timeStamp - last_clicked;

    last_clicked = event.timeStamp;

    if(time_since_clicked < 2000)
      return false;

    return true;
  });   
};

Using like this:

$('#my-form').preventDoubleSubmission();

I found that the solutions that didn't include some kind of timeout but just disabled submission or disabled form elements caused problems because once the lock-out is triggered you can't submit again until you refresh the page. That causes some problems for me when doing ajax stuff.

This can probably be prettied up a bit as its not that fancy.

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this code will display loading on the button label, and set button to

disable state, then after processing, re-enable and return back the original button text**

$(function () {

    $(".btn-Loading").each(function (idx, elm) {
        $(elm).click(function () {
            //do processing
            if ($(".input-validation-error").length > 0)
                return;
            $(this).attr("label", $(this).text()).text("loading ....");
            $(this).delay(1000).animate({ disabled: true }, 1000, function () {
                //original event call
                $.when($(elm).delay(1000).one("click")).done(function () {
                    $(this).animate({ disabled: false }, 1000, function () {
                        $(this).text($(this).attr("label"));
                    })
                });
                //processing finalized
            });
        });
    });
    // and fire it after definition
}

);

share|improve this answer

Modified Nathan's solution a little for Bootstrap 3. This will set a loading text to the submit button. In addition it will timeout after 30 seconds and allow the form to be resubmitted.

jQuery.fn.preventDoubleSubmission = function() {
  $('input[type="submit"]').data('loading-text', 'Loading...');

  $(this).on('submit',function(e){
    var $form = $(this);

    $('input[type="submit"]', $form).button('loading');

    if ($form.data('submitted') === true) {
      // Previously submitted - don't submit again
      e.preventDefault();
    } else {
      // Mark it so that the next submit can be ignored
      $form.data('submitted', true);
      $form.setFormTimeout();
    }
  });

  // Keep chainability
  return this;
};

jQuery.fn.setFormTimeout = function() {
  var $form = $(this);
  setTimeout(function() {
    $('input[type="submit"]', $form).button('reset');
    alert('Form failed to submit within 30 seconds');
  }, 30000);
};
share|improve this answer

I solved a very similar issue using:

$("#my_form").submit(function(){
    $('input[type=submit]').click(function(event){
        event.preventDefault();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

Use jQuery live event to submit your form:

$("#submitForm").live('click', function () { 
    $("#commentform").submit();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
Can you add more detail? Very short answers tend to be frowned on here and can be in danger of being converted into comments. –  Kazark Mar 19 at 14:07
1  
... As of jQuery 1.7, the .live() method is deprecated. live is dead, man. –  MikeSmithDev Mar 19 at 14:17

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