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In Python, which data structure is more efficient/speedy? Assuming that order is not important to me and I would be checking for duplicates anyway, is a Python set slower than a Python list?

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up vote 75 down vote accepted

It depends on what you are intending to do with it. Sets are significantly faster when it comes to determining if an object is present in the set (as in x in s), but are slower than lists when it comes to iterating over their contents. You can use the timeit module to see which is faster for your situation.

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1  
For your point: "Sets are significantly faster ", what is the underlying implementation that makes it faster? – overexchange Jul 13 '15 at 13:50
2  
@overexchange hash tables stackoverflow.com/a/3949350/125507 – endolith Jul 31 '15 at 1:01

When you want to store some values which you'll be iterating over, Python's list constructs are slightly faster. However, if you'll be storing (unique) values in order to check for their existence, then sets are significantly faster.

It turns out tuples perform in almost exactly the same way as lists, but they do use less memory by removing the ability to modify them after creation (immutable).

Iterating

>>> def iter_test(iterable):
...     for i in iterable:
...         pass
...
>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit(
...     "iter_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import iter_test; iterable = set(range(10000))",
...     number=100000)
12.666952133178711
>>> timeit(
...     "iter_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import iter_test; iterable = list(range(10000))",
...     number=100000)
9.917098999023438
>>> timeit(
...     "iter_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import iter_test; iterable = tuple(range(10000))",
...     number=100000)
9.865639209747314

Determine if an object is present

>>> def in_test(iterable):
...     for i in range(1000):
...         if i in iterable:
...             pass
...
>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit(
...     "in_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import in_test; iterable = set(range(1000))",
...     number=10000)
0.5591847896575928
>>> timeit(
...     "in_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import in_test; iterable = list(range(1000))",
...     number=10000)
50.18339991569519
>>> timeit(
...     "in_test(iterable)",
...     setup="from __main__ import in_test; iterable = tuple(range(1000))",
...     number=10000)
51.597304821014404
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5  
I definitely approve of testing timings, but I think your results are misleading, since they include both the operation you're timing (iteration/membership) and creating the object. In my testing, creating a set is much slower than creating a list or a tuple, but the difference between iterating over them is very small. I would generally expect a program to iterate over a given set far more often than it creates the set. – me_and Sep 10 '14 at 10:37
    
Ah yes, I see what you mean. I'll update the answer when I get some time. Thanks! – Flyte Sep 10 '14 at 10:58
2  
I have found that (Initializing set -> 5.5300979614257812) (Initializing list -> 1.8846848011016846) (Initializing tuple -> 1.8730108737945557) Items of size 10,000 on my intel core i5 quad core with 12GB RAM. This should be take into consideration also. – ThePracticalOne Sep 29 '14 at 17:39
3  
I've updated the code to remove the object creation now. The setup phase of the timeit loops is only called once (docs.python.org/2/library/timeit.html#timeit.Timer.timeit). – Flyte Sep 30 '14 at 10:09

It depends on what you mean by "checking for duplicates anyway". What percentage of input is unique? Also slower to do what? Try writing (for each of set and list) the code that does what you want to do, and time it. You can then ask here to have your code and timing methodology checked/improved.

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List performance:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit(stmt='10**6 in a', setup='a = range(10**6)', number=100000)
0.008128150348026608

Set performance:

>>> timeit.timeit(stmt='10**6 in a', setup='a = set(range(10**6))', number=100000)
0.005674857488571661

You may want to consider Tuples as they're similar to lists but can’t be modified. They take up slightly less memory and are faster to access. They aren’t as flexible but are more efficient than lists. Their normal use is to serve as dictionary keys.

Sets are also sequence structures but with two differences from lists and tuples. Although sets do have an order, that order is arbitrary and not under the programmer’s control. The second difference is that the elements in a set must be unique.

set by definition. [python | wiki].

>>> x = set([1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3])
>>> x
{1, 2, 3}
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1  
First off, you should update to the set built-in type link (docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#set) not the deprecated sets library. Second, "Sets are also sequence structures", read the following from the built-in type link: "Being an unordered collection, sets do not record element position or order of insertion. Accordingly, sets do not support indexing, slicing, or other sequence-like behavior." – Seaux Feb 5 '14 at 2:25

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