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I'm testing some legacy code that extends the default php exception object. This code prints out a custom HTML error message.

I would like to mock this exception object in such a way that when the tested code generates an exception it will just echo the basic message instead of giving me the whole HTML message.

I cannot figure out a way to do this. It seems like you can test for explicit exceptions, but you can't change in a general way the behavior of an exception, and you also can't mock up an object that extends a default php functionality. ( can't think of another example of this beyond exceptions... but it would seem to be the case )

I guess the problem is, where would you attach the mocked object?? It seems like you can't interfere with 'throw new' and this is the place that the object method is called....

Or if you could somehow use the existing phpunit exception functionality to change the exception behavior the way you want, in a general way for all your code... but this seems like it would be hacky and bad....

EDIT: here is some code to make things clearer:

class FooTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase{

    public function testBar(){
        include '/path/to/file.php'; //generates exception

        $this->assertTrue($baz);             
    }
}
 ...
//overridden exception class
class Foo_Exception extends ErrorException{
 ...

so, my question, is there a way to deal with this overriden class, without doing it on a case by case basis? what if I'm not testing the behavior of the exception, just the code that causes the exception?

share|improve this question
    
OK now I'm getting confused. Either the exception in the include is not caught, and then my first answer holds or it is caught and my second answer holds. The kind of exception it is is irrelevant. –  Artefacto May 14 '10 at 23:46
    
you're right... I was confused about how ob_start would handle things... However... your solution does work to suppress the error message, but it also means that it treats all output equally... I guess I was asking about a more specific solution to deal with the exception class itself.... but now that I've thought it all the way through this doesn't seem feasible... or necessarily desirable... I guess best case for dealing with the behavior of the object is to raise exceptions for each case. Sometimes things only make sense when you ask a vague question.... –  awongh May 15 '10 at 1:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would first write a test that captures the exception generation behavior:

include '/path/to/file.php'; //generates exception
public function testCatchFooException() {
    try {
        $this->assertTrue($baz);             
    }
    catch (Exception $expected) {
        $this->assertEquals('This is expected html from exception', $expected->getMessage());
        return;
    }

    $this->fail('An expected Exception has not been raised Foo_Excpetion.');
}

Now you can do several things with this coverage test. You can either fix up the exception, or fix the code that causes the exception.

Another thing you can do is wrap the entire file.php in a class:

 class FooClass {

    function runFoo() {
        include '/path/to/file.php'; //generates exception

    }   

}

Then add tests while using extract method until you isolate exception.

[EDIT]

Here is some serious procedural legacy code:

<?php
require_once 'helper.php';  //helper file

function countNewMessages($user_id) {
}

function countNewOrders() {
}

function countNewReturns() {
}

function getDB($init = NULL) {
}

function getDisplay() {
}

getDisplay();

?>

And here is the wrapped class:

<?php
require_once '';  //helper file

class Displayer {
    function countNewMessages($user_id) {
    }

    function countNewOrders() {
    }

    function countNewReturns() {
    }

    function getDB($init = NULL) {
    }

    function getDisplay() {
    }
}
?>

And now I can test it:

    function testGetDisplay() {
    $display = new Displayer();

    $this->assertEquals('html code', $display->getDisplay());
}

And test the individual functions in it. And if I can further sprout methods on it.

The above test would be considered a coverage test. There may be bugs in it, but that is what it does. So as I sprout methods the get more code coverage from tests by sprouting that I can make sure I don't break the output.

share|improve this answer
    
can you explain more about your second example? what would the tests look like? You would do $foo_instance = new FooClass ... then capture ... $foo_instance->runFoo() ... inside a test?? –  awongh May 15 '10 at 1:32
    
This is something I got from Michael Feather's Book WEWLC. It's all an object any way. See my edit. –  Gutzofter May 15 '10 at 2:13

OK, I misunderstood the question. If the script you're testing catches the error and then echoes an error page, then this has nothing to do with exceptions. You can use the ob_ family:

ob_start();
include $file;
$contents = ob_get_contents();

if (result_is_error($contents))
    die(extract_error_from_result($contents));
else
    echo $contents;

ob_end_clean();
share|improve this answer
    
I should have included some code or pseudo code to make it more clear, but I don't think this will work either: this thread says that you will still see thrown exceptions even while you buffer the output.... stackoverflow.com/questions/2201841/… And after I dove further into the code, it also looks like the errors are originating from more places than I originally thought.... I think maybe I just wrote a poorly defined question.... –  awongh May 14 '10 at 23:32
    
You would maybe see the thrown exceptions if they are not caught and the exception handler spits an error message and kills the script. I'm not sure if that's the behavior of the default exception handler, but even if it is, it does not apply when the exception is caught. –  Artefacto May 14 '10 at 23:47

The extened PHP exception object "prints" a costum HTML error page? You mean its error message is an entire HTML page? That's not very clever...

What you can do about it is to replace the default exception handler (see this function), call getMessage on the exception and parse the HTML error page to extract the message. Then you can print the error message and kill the script. Like this (in PHP 5.3):

set_exception_handler(
    function (Exception $e) {
        die(parse_html_error_page($e->getMessage()));
    }
);
share|improve this answer
    
well, the script processes the error in some minor ways before it includes an HTML file for output to the user, with a 'pretty' formatted message. I agree that this possibly wasn't the most modular approach.... I don't think this will work, though, because this error handling class is serving the message for errors that were caught within the script. set_error_handler only works for errors that weren't caught.... –  awongh May 14 '10 at 2:09

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