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Here is my code:

// Function code
public static int something(){
    int number1 = 1;
    int number2 = 2;
    return number1, number2;
}

// Main class code
public static void main(String[] args) {
  something();
  System.out.println(number1 + number2);
}

Error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.RuntimeException: Uncompilable source code - missing return statement
    at assignment.Main.something(Main.java:86)
    at assignment.Main.main(Main.java:53)

Java Result: 1

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8 Answers 8

up vote 48 down vote accepted

Instead of returning an array that contains the two values or using a generic Pair class, consider creating a class that represents the result that you want to return, and return an instance of that class. Give the class a meaningful name. The benefits of this approach over using an array are type safety and it will make your program much easier to understand.

Note: A generic Pair class, as proposed in some of the other answers here, also gives you type safety, but doesn't convey what the result represents.

Example (which doesn't use really meaningful names):

final class MyResult {
    private final int first;
    private final int second;

    public MyResult(int first, int second) {
        this.first = first;
        this.second = second;
    }

    public int getFirst() {
        return first;
    }

    public int getSecond() {
        return second;
    }
}

// ...

public static MyResult something() {
    int number1 = 1;
    int number2 = 2;

    return new MyResult(number1, number2);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    MyResult result = something();
    System.out.println(result.getFirst() + result.getSecond());
}
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1  
This would be my preferred route - presumably the pair of numbers has some meaning, and it would be nice if the return type represented this. –  Armand May 14 '10 at 11:50

Java does not support multi-value returns. Return an array of values.

// Function code
public static int[] something(){
    int number1 = 1;
    int number2 = 2;
    return new int[] {number1, number2};
}

// Main class code
public static void main(String[] args) {
  int result[] = something();
  System.out.println(result[0] + result[1]);
}
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Thanks. Got it!! –  javaLearner.java May 14 '10 at 7:33

You could implement a generic Pair if you are sure that you just need to return two values:

public class Pair<U, V> {

 /**
     * The first element of this <code>Pair</code>
     */
    private U first;

    /**
     * The second element of this <code>Pair</code>
     */
    private V second;

    /**
     * Constructs a new <code>Pair</code> with the given values.
     * 
     * @param first  the first element
     * @param second the second element
     */
    public Pair(U first, V second) {

        this.first = first;
        this.second = second;
    }

//getter for first and second

and then have the method return that Pair:

public Pair<Object, Object> getSomePair();
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You can only return one value in Java, so the neatest way is like this:

return new Pair<Integer>(number1, number2);

Here's an updated version of your code:

public class Scratch
{
    // Function code
    public static Pair<Integer> something() {
        int number1 = 1;
        int number2 = 2;
        return new Pair<Integer>(number1, number2);
    }

    // Main class code
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Pair<Integer> pair = something();
        System.out.println(pair.first() + pair.second());
    }
}

class Pair<T> {
    private final T m_first;
    private final T m_second;

    public Pair(T first, T second) {
        m_first = first;
        m_second = second;
    }

    public T first() {
        return m_first;
    }

    public T second() {
        return m_second;
    }
}
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Try this :

// Function code
public static int[] something(){
    int number1 = 1;
    int number2 = 2;
    return new int[] {number1, number2};
}

// Main class code
public static void main(String[] args) {
  int[] ret = something();
  System.out.println(ret[0] + ret[1]);
}
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you have to use collections to return more then one return values

in your case you write your code as

public static List something(){
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        int number1 = 1;
        int number2 = 2;
        list.add(number1);
        list.add(number2);
        return list;
    }

    // Main class code
    public static void main(String[] args) {
      something();
      List<Integer> numList = something();
    }
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public class Mulretun
{
    public String name;;
    public String location;
    public String[] getExample()
    {
        String ar[] = new String[2];
        ar[0]="siva";
        ar[1]="dallas";
        return ar; //returning two values at once
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Mulretun m=new Mulretun();
        String ar[] =m.getExample();
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<ar.length;i++)
        System.out.println("return values are: " + ar[i]);      

    }
}

o/p:
return values are: siva
return values are: dallas
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You also can send in mutable objects as parameters, if you use methods to modify them then they will be modified when you return from the function. It won't work on stuff like Float, since it is immutable.

public class HelloWorld{

     public static void main(String []args){
        HelloWorld world = new HelloWorld();

        world.run();
     }



    private class Dog
    {
       private String name;
       public void setName(String s)
       {
           name = s;
       }
       public String getName() { return name;}
       public Dog(String name)
       {
           setName(name);
       }
    }

    public void run()
    {
       Dog newDog = new Dog("John");
       nameThatDog(newDog);
       System.out.println(newDog.getName());
     }


     public void nameThatDog(Dog dog)
     {
         dog.setName("Rutger");
     }
}

The result is: Rutger

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