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Should I call .Dispose() after returning an object that implements IDisposable?

myDisposableObject Gimme() {
  //Code
  return disposableResult;
  disposableResult.Dispose();
}

In other words, is the object I return a copy, or is it the object itself? Thanks :)

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Tip: It is not the method's responsibility to dispose of the returned object. It is the job of the caller. It is the responsibilty of the method to dispose on any resources that it created, if needed. –  AMissico May 14 '10 at 9:39
    
@AMissico: "It is not the method's responsibility to dispose of the returned object." Unfortunately, that's not true in general. For some methods and some property getters, the caller is responsible for disposing the returned object, for others it isn't, because the object is cached somewhere and disposed elsewhere. Apparently, there's no simple rule to find out which except trial&error. –  nikie May 14 '10 at 10:58
1  
Also, and someone correct me if I'm wrong, your last line never actually gets called anyway since the return exits the method. –  Chris Haas May 14 '10 at 13:25
    
@nikie: It is always true in managed code. I know of no exceptions to this rule in the .NET Framework libraries. (There are the exceptions that usually involve Interop to unmanaged code.) Obviously, you do not Dispose an object just because it implements IDisposable. There is no requirement that you call Dispose. The interface allows the programmer to "clean-up" unmanaged resources after an object is no longer needed. This a part of the design goals of the .NET Framework. To eliminate the need for the programmer to handle memory managment and memory-related bugs. –  AMissico May 14 '10 at 14:27
1  
@nikie: "Apparently, there's no simple rule to find out which except trial-and-error;" I completely disagree. Read the documentation for the object in question. –  AMissico May 14 '10 at 14:36
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12 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's the object itself. Don't call Dispose here, even if you reverse the order so that it gets called.

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1  
Thanks, concise answer. –  Camilo Martin May 14 '10 at 9:26
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No, you shouldn't. You return a reference to the object, so there is no copy made. In .NET objects are never copied unless you specifically ask for it.

Also, you can't dispose the object with code like that even if there was a situation where you should. The code after the return statement will never be executed, and you will get a warning about unreachable code.

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One thing that none of the answers so far have mentioned is that you should dispose the object if Gimme throws an exception. For example:

MyDisposableObject Gimme() 
{
    MyDisposableObject disposableResult = null;
    try
    {
        MyDisposableObject disposableResult = ...

        // ... Code to prepare disposableResult

        return disposableResult;
    }
    catch(Exception)
    {
        if (disposableResult != null) disposableResult.Dispose();
        throw;
    }
}
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+1, Interesting, didn't know that. I'll start doing that with exception-prone objects. –  Camilo Martin May 15 '10 at 10:38
    
This is a good suggestion in general for factories, etc. -- but with the code he posted, I'm not so sure -- and maybe it's just meant to be pseudo code -- but in the code he posted, it didn't create disposableResult -- it might be a shared object, etc.. -- the owner of an object should be the one to dispose it... if it created the object (or caused the object to be created) and was just going to set it up and hand it back, but instead threw an exception in the process, then yes, it should be the one to dispose it in this scenario. –  BrainSlugs83 Mar 30 at 21:58
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disposableResult.Dispose(); will never run, it is unreachable code as it will always return the line before. Wrap the method call in a using staement and dispose of the object that way.
e.g.

using (DisposeableObject myDisposableObject = gimme())
{
    //code.
}
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Your code will lead to compile error, because you used keyword object to name a variable :P –  prostynick May 14 '10 at 9:27
1  
Yeah also i don't think the "...code." section is valid syntax either ;-) I changed it anyway. –  Ben Robinson May 14 '10 at 9:32
    
@prostynick: It is just example code, no need to quibble. –  AMissico May 14 '10 at 9:33
2  
Usually, //... is what you use. –  AMissico May 14 '10 at 9:34
    
All better now ;-) –  Ben Robinson May 14 '10 at 9:41
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The .Dispose() will never be reached anyway.

Edit: In my opinion, no, you shouldn't. You'd destroy the Object with that.

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If an object you are using implements IDisposable, you should construct and use in within a using statement - this will make sure it gets disposed of properly:

using(var mydisposableObject = new Gimme())
{
   // code
}

The way your code is constructed, you are returning the disposable object, so the call to Dispose will never be reached.

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I meant this inside the function's body, not outside. –  Camilo Martin May 14 '10 at 9:25
    
@Camilo Martin - No point in doing that as the call to Dispose will never be reached. You should wrap the call to this function with a using statement so Dispose gets called properly when the object goes out of scope. –  Oded May 14 '10 at 9:27
    
If a "return mydisposableObject;" is executed within the "using" statement, a .Dispose of mydisposableObject will occur between the execution of the return statement and the caller's first chance to use mydisposableObject. In most cases, this will render mydisposableObject completely useless to the caller. –  supercat Jan 3 '11 at 21:52
    
This is the correct way to do it -- what's he's telling you is that your factory should not be disposing the object -- but the owner of the object (the thing that invokes your factory) should be disposing it. (Unless your factory is handing back a singleton, of which it manages the life-cycle, but even then, it shouldn't dispose it right there -- it should dispose it elsewhere). –  BrainSlugs83 Mar 30 at 21:53
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If you return the object, you should not dispose it before you return. It has to be up to the caller to dispose it.

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This line: disposableResult.Dispose(); will not be executed. The returned "thing" is not a copy of object. It's a reference to object, so caller will manipulate on object created in Gimme and he (caller) should remember to dispose the object.

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You could wrap your code in a try/finally block

    try{
            int a = 0;
            return;
    }
    finally{
            //Code here will be called after you return
    }
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myDisposableObject disposableResult = new myDisposableObject();

Here disposableResult is a reference to the new object created. So when you return that reference to the calling method, that reference is still pointing to the created object in the heap. Hence you can safely dispose it in the calling method.

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You cannot have .Dispose() in the method which is returned.The caller should implement that.

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I agree do not dispose this object it is being passed by reference.. There is a particular case I can think of when spawning objects where a class wraps another class and dispenses objects: You do not want the object dispensed to be a reference to the same one so you clone or pass a copy of the object and destroy the original, however if the original is a standard image for all spawns of that type, the object is not created specifically to each call and you anticipate numerouse spawns in a short period of time you may want to keep it as you can spawn a new object from that image without actually instantiating it again.. I would select to lock all properties on this to read only and cast the readonly object to a read/write object that can be used in the reallworld. The object should not be running any threads within itself when it is passed as value copy or clone, however if it is threading it is perfectly fine to pass it's reference so long as the reference is a 1 to 1 relationship, if you have multiple pointers to an object who are concurrently reading and writing to that "running image" object you may begin to have collissions where a value has not been safely stored and the next pinger requests and assigns that same value. One thing we did not discuss when I was in school to a huge degree is object states. The object oriented principals were ingrained, but understanding why they were established has always taken time.. I'm backwords I learned object oriented style then moved in to more procedural styles.

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Welcome to SO! This question of mine is from 2.5 years ago so I can only comment on the writing style of your answer: please consider improving it a bit, as in its current state it looks a bit like a wall of text. It also has a few typos, and people here tend to be sensible to that. That said, thanks again for passing by and answering. –  Camilo Martin Feb 5 '13 at 3:29
    
Sorry for the text wall, just wanted to state an instance where we would destroy an object. –  user2051624 Feb 7 '13 at 16:45
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