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If I have a class that raises an event, with (e.g.) FrobbingEventArgs, am I allowed to handle it with a method that takes EventArgs?

Here's some code:

class Program
{
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
      Frobber frobber = new Frobber();
      frobber.Frobbing += FrobberOnFrobbing;
      frobber.Frob();
   }

   private static void FrobberOnFrobbing(object sender,
       EventArgs e)
   {
      // Do something interesting. Note that the parameter is 'EventArgs'.
   }
}

internal class Frobber
{
   public event EventHandler<FrobbingEventArgs> Frobbing;
   public event EventHandler<FrobbedEventArgs> Frobbed;

   public void Frob()
   {
      OnFrobbing();

      // Frob.

      OnFrobbed();
   }

   private void OnFrobbing()
   {
      var handler = Frobbing;
      if (handler != null)
         handler(this, new FrobbingEventArgs());
   }

   private void OnFrobbed()
   {
      var handler = Frobbed;
      if (handler != null)
         handler(this, new FrobbedEventArgs());
   }
}

internal class FrobbedEventArgs : EventArgs { }
internal class FrobbingEventArgs : EventArgs { }

The reason I ask is that ReSharper seems to have a problem with (what looks like) the equivalent in XAML, and I'm wondering if it's a bug in ReSharper, or a mistake in my understanding of C#.

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1  
It's a good example of frobnication :) –  Dercsár May 14 '10 at 10:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Maybe covariant's not the word

Close. The word you are looking for is contravariant. Conversion of a method group to a delegate type is covariant in return type and contravariant in formal parameter types.

Here's my blog article on the subject:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2007/10/19/covariance-and-contravariance-in-c-part-three-member-group-conversion-variance.aspx

if I have a class that raises an event, with (e.g.) FrobbingEventArgs, am I allowed to handle it with a method that takes EventArgs?

Well, you tried it and it worked, so clearly yes. For the justification in the specification see the section helpfully entitled "Method group conversions".

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Eric, thanks for the correction -- changed "covariant" to "contravariant". Also thanks for the justification. –  Roger Lipscombe May 14 '10 at 15:11
    
This is unproblematic and works fine because the method group conversion of the second code line in Main converts to the exact same constructed generic type. (Runtime type is equal to compiletime type.) So this also works with .NET 2.0. Just if someone comes here searching for "contravariance", note the following (.NET 4.0): Don't make an event like public event Action<FrobbingEventArgs> Frobbing; because Action<in T> is contravariant (in). People could then add an Action<EventArgs> or similar to the event. And that won't work if other subscribers use a different Action<T>. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 12 '12 at 14:32

Yes you can but when you access the e parameter in the event handler you will only be able to access the members that belong to EventArgs base class unless you cast it as the derived type. I think the word is polymorphic rather than covariant and all classes in c# are pollymorphic, it is a language feature.

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The fact that FrobbedEventArgs can be casted to EventArgs is polymorphism, but I think the fact that a delegate of type EventHandler<EventArgs> can be added to a EventHandler<FrobbedEventArgs> event is covariance. –  nikie May 14 '10 at 11:11
    
@nikie Actually, if you look at EventHandler<TEventArgs>, you will see that it's invariant, not contravariant, in its generic parameter. It says EventHandler<TEventArgs>, not EventHandler<in TEventArgs>. So in this case it's not possible to add an EventHandler<EventArgs> to an EventHandler<FrobbedEventArgs> event like you say. So it's contravariance of the method group conversion which creates an EventHandler<EventArgs> even if the static target method has "smaller" requirements to its argument. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 12 '12 at 15:16
    
@JeppeStigNielsen: The behavior you note is an unfortunate consequence of Microsoft's decision not to have delegates define a Combine method, but instead use Delegate.Combine. Given interfaces IFoo, IBar, and IBoth:IFoo,IBar, If delegate type Action<T> defined its own combine method, it would be possible for Action<IBoth>.Combine to accept an Action<IFoo> and an Action<IBar> and yield an Action<IBoth>. As it is, though, there's no way for Delegate.Combine to determine what type it could possibly use to combine an Action<IFoo> and an Action<IBar>. –  supercat Dec 8 '12 at 0:05
    
@supercat I agree, there's no way Delegate.Combine(Delegate, Delegate) can determine the type. They could solve it like you suggest. Another possibility is to make a generic but still static combine medthod, public static TDel Combine<TDel>(TDel x, TDel y) where TDel : Delegate { /* use typeof(TDel) in here */ }. In that case, the + in C# between two delegates of equal compile-time type TDel should "translate" to a call to the generic Combine<TDel> method. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 8 '12 at 8:40
    
@JeppeStigNielsen: The type system cannot handle generic constraints of delegate types. Also, it's worth noting that while one it's possible to write a type-safe CombineAction<T> method which, given two delegates whose signatures are compatible with Action<T> an Action<T1> and Action<T2> will yield an Action<T> which, when invoked, will run both actions in sequence, and a non-type-safe version that will work with any two delegates whose signatures would be compatible with Action<T>, in neither case would the resulting delegate be compatible with the... –  supercat Dec 10 '12 at 16:17

Since events can only be invoked from within the class that declared them, your derived class cannot directly invoke events declared within the base class.

You can achieve what you want by creating a protected invoking method for the event. By calling this invoking method, your derived class can invoke the event.

For even more flexibility, the invoking method is often declared as virtual, which allows the derived class to override it. This allows the derived class to intercept the events that the base class is invoking, possibly doing its own processing of them.

You can do:

protected void OnFrobbing(EventArgs e) 
   { 
      var handler = Frobbing; 
      if (handler != null) 
         handler(this, new e); 
   } 

Or:

protected virtual void OnFrobbing(EventArgs e) 
   { 
      var handler = Frobbing; 
      if (handler != null) 
         handler(this, new e); 
   } 
share|improve this answer
    
-1: It's the EventArgs that's derived, not the class raising the event... –  Roger Lipscombe May 14 '10 at 12:31

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