Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Java: notify() vs. notifyAll() all over again

Why does java.lang.Object have two notify methods - notify and notifyAll? It seems that notifyAll does at least everything notify does, so why not just use notifyAll all the time? If notifyAll is used instead of notify, is the program still correct, and vice versa? What influences the choice between these two methods?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Shog9 Oct 21 '11 at 18:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
The accepted answer to that question hints at an answer - that the difference is performance, waking up threads that can do no real work by using notifyAll is simply a performance concern. So I think that answers this question - notifyAll is always correct - just not as performant. –  mdma May 14 '10 at 15:49
2  
Since Java 5 (in 2004), a new concurrency library have been added. (This library is actually much older) I suggest you use those classes and I would discourage the use of notify or notifyAll. –  Peter Lawrey May 14 '10 at 22:19
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The answer to this question is right here on StackOverflow: Java notify() vs. notifyAll().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - I'd searched but strangely didn't find it. –  mdma May 14 '10 at 13:17
add comment

Two typical examples.

Let's say you have a producer thread and a consumer thread. Each "packet" produced by the producer should be consumed by a consumer. The consumer puts something in a queue and then calls notify() (Only one consumer should be let through to process one "packet".)

Let's say you want to have a notification when a lengthy process has finished. You want a beep and a screen update. The process performs notifyAll() to notify both the beeping-thread and the screen-update-thread.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  //contribute By E.Thulasiram and Team
   class AA extends Thread{
AA a;
public void get(AA a){
    this.a=a;
}
public void run(){
    System.out.println("one");
    synchronized (a) {
        try{
            a.wait();
            System.out.println("one wake up");
            this.wait();
        }catch(Exception e){
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }
}
     }
     class BB extends Thread{
AA a;
public void get(AA a){
    this.a=a;
}
public void run(){
    System.out.println("two");
    synchronized (a) {
        try{
            a.wait();
            System.out.println("two wake up");
        }catch(Exception e){
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }
 }
     }
     class CC extends Thread{
AA a;
public void get(AA a){
    this.a=a;
}
public void run(){
    synchronized (a) {
        a.notifyAll();
        System.out.println("NotifyAll");
    }
}
    } 
    class DD{
public static void main(String args[]){
    AA a=new AA();
    BB b=new BB();
    CC c=new CC();
    a.get(a);
    a.start();
    b.get(a);
    b.start();
    c.get(a);
    c.start();
}
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

According to the JavaDoc for notify:

Wakes up a single thread that is waiting on this object's monitor. If any threads are waiting on this object, one of them is chosen to be awakened. The choice is arbitrary and occurs at the discretion of the implementation. A thread waits on an object's monitor by calling one of the wait methods.

This might be useful if you had an application that uses, for example, a queue to place items and then has many worker threads that will pull items off of the queue. When an item is ready, you could call notify to wake up a single worker to process the item. Admittedly this example is a bit contrived - there are likely better ways to implement this in Java - but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The difference is that notify() thumps only the one thread waiting on the current thread. For most producer/consumer and delegate-and-wait applications, this is the proper method to use. Also, if only one other thread is waiting on the current thread, there is no need to notify more than that one waiting thread.

In contrast, notifyAll() thumps all of the other threads waiting on the current thread. This is more useful in situations where every (related) sleeping thread must do something, such as in response to a fatal or high-importance event enccountered by the notifying thread.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.