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I have the following class:

class BritneySpears
{
  public:

    int getValue() { return m_value; };

  private:

    int m_value;
};

Which is an external library (that I can't change). I obviously can't change the value of m_value, only read it. Even deriving from BritneySpears won't work.

What if I define the following class:

class AshtonKutcher
{
  public:

    int getValue() { return m_value; };

  public:

    int m_value;
};

And then do:

BritneySpears b;

// Here comes the ugly hack
AshtonKutcher* a = reinterpret_cast<AshtonKutcher*>(&b);
a->m_value = 17;

// Print out the value
std::cout << b.getValue() << std::endl;

I know this is bad practice. But just out of curiosity: is this guaranteed to work? Is it defined behaviour?

Bonus question: Have you ever had to use such an ugly hack?

Edit: Just to scare fewer people: I don't intend to actually do this in real code. I'm just wondering ;)

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1  
How do you know what is inside BritneySpears?! :) (No pun intended). And why would you want to do that even? as there is no way to change m_value, and if there was a way to define what m_value was, then that interface would be available to the public user. –  Akanksh May 14 '10 at 13:20
14  
This code could be optimized greatly by just having BritneySpears::getValue() and AshtonKutcher::getValue() simply return 0. –  Syntactic May 14 '10 at 13:21
1  
@ereOn: Oh, I'm not clever enough to point out errors in C++ code. I was referring to the fact that if these classes correctly modeled the actual Britney Spears and Ashton Kutcher, they would have to have a value of 0. –  Syntactic May 14 '10 at 13:37
4  
Why do you want to access Britney Spears' private parts? (I'm sorry. I tried really hard, but I just couldn't resist.) –  sbi May 14 '10 at 13:48
3  
+1 for using BritneySpears in an example with undefined behavior. –  Hugh Brackett May 14 '10 at 15:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

This is undefined behaviour. The members within each access-qualifier section are guaranteed to be laid out in the order they appear, but there is no such guarantee between acccess qualifiers. For instance, if the compiler chooses to place all private members before all public members, the above two classes will have a different layout.

Edit: Revisiting this old answer, I realized that I missed a rather obvious point: the struct definitions have exactly one data member each. The order of member functions is irrelevant, since they don't contribute to the class's layout. You might well find that both data members are guaranteed to be in the same place, though I don't know the standard well enough to say for sure.

But! You cannot dereference the result of reinterpret_casting between unrelated types. It's still UB. At least, that's my reading of http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/reinterpret_cast, which is a gnarly read indeed.

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1  
So what If every member of BritneySpears was private, and every member of AshtonKutcher was public ? Would the order become guaranteed ? –  ereOn May 14 '10 at 13:33
1  
@ereOn: Only if they were all in a single access-qualifier section. Having two sections, both private, still results in an unspecified memory layout. –  Marcelo Cantos May 14 '10 at 13:40
1  
The best strategy is to avoid clever tricks. ;-) –  Marcelo Cantos May 14 '10 at 14:00
2  
@ereOn For stuff like this, the only way to know for sure is to read and understand the standard. –  KeithB May 14 '10 at 14:21
1  
Even if the members were typographically identical in each class, you still could not guarantee the actual memory layout if they are compiled with different compiler options or different compilers. –  David R Tribble May 14 '10 at 14:44

This is undefined behavior, for the reasons Marcelo pointed out. But sometimes you need to resort to such things when integrating external code you can't modify. A simpler way to do it (and equally undefined behavior) is:

#define private public
#include "BritneySpears.h"
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This is a nice trick :) –  ereOn May 14 '10 at 13:35
3  
we can have private members without the label "private" so this may not work ;) –  Nick Dandoulakis May 14 '10 at 13:38
    
@Nick D: Works on structs though (?) –  Tom May 14 '10 at 13:41
1  
@Nick: #define class struct. Not that I'd ever do anything like that. –  Mike Seymour May 14 '10 at 13:43
1  
@Tyler, that's good info. Although, aren't you pretty well hosed in general if you mix compilers like that? C++ doesn't have a defined ABI after all. –  Michael Kristofik May 14 '10 at 13:47

You might not be able to modify the library for BritneySpears, but you should be able to modify the .h header file. If so, you can make AshtonKutcher a friend of BritneySpears:

class BritneySpears 
{
    friend class AshtonKutcher;
  public: 

    int getValue() { return m_value; }; 

  private: 

    int m_value; 
}; 

class AshtonKutcher 
{ 
  public: 

    int getValue(const BritneySpears & ref) { return ref.m_value; }; 
}; 

I can't really condone this trick, and I don't think I've ever tried it myself, but it should be legal well-defined C++.

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1  
Who would want to be friends with Britney Spears? –  FredOverflow May 14 '10 at 15:49

@Marcelo has it right: the order of members is undefined across different access levels.

But consider the following code; here, AshtonKutcher has exactly the same layout as BritneySpears:

class AshtonKutcher
{
  public:
    int getValue() { return m_value; };
    friend void setValue(AshtonKutcher&, int);

  private:
    int m_value;
};

void setValue(AshtonKutcher& ac, int value) {
    ac.m_Value = value;
}

I believe that this may actually be valid C++.

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Well, we have no guarantee that the compiler will order the different sections in the same order for two different classes. Well, I can't see which implementation would act like that, but still. –  ereOn May 14 '10 at 13:43

Use of reinterpret_cast should usually be avoided and it's not guaranteed to give portable results.

Also, why do you want to change the private member? You could just wrap the original class in a new one (prefer composition over inheritance) and handle the getValue method as you wish.

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Well, I was just wondering. I don't intend to this in any real code ;) –  ereOn May 14 '10 at 13:30
    
Since the method getValue is not virtual, you will not be able to change its behavior in existing code by extending the class (all existing references at base level will call the base method, and the method --not really overriding-- in the derived class will never be called) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 14 '10 at 13:47
    
That is correct. I removed it from the answer. –  kgiannakakis May 14 '10 at 15:02

There is an issue with your code, underlined by the answers. The problem comes from ordering the values.

However you were almost there:

class AshtonKutcher
{
public:

  int getValue() const { return m_value; }
  int& getValue() { return m_value; }

private:
  int m_value;
};

Now, you have the exact same layout because you have the same attributes, declared in the same order, and with the same access rights... and neither object has a virtual table.

The trick is thus not to change the access level, but to add a method :)

Unless, of course, I missed something.

Did I precise it was a maintenance nightmare ?

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