Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function with this code:

foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in typeof(T).GetProperties()){
//SOME CODE
if (propertyInfo.CanWrite)
    propertyInfo.SetValue(myCopy, propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null), null);
}

I would avoid to check "collection" properties; to do this now I have insert this control:

 if (propertyInfo.PropertyType.Name.Contains("List")
     || propertyInfo.PropertyType.Name.Contains("Enumerable")
     || propertyInfo.PropertyType.Name.Contains("Collection"))
     continue;

but, It don't like me!

Which is a better way to do it?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I was thinking you might want to check the interfaces the type of the property implements. (Removed redundant interfaces, as IList inherits ICollection and ICollection inherits IEnumerable.)

static void DoSomething<T>()
{
    List<Type> collections = new List<Type>() { typeof(IEnumerable<>), typeof(IEnumerable) };

    foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in typeof(T).GetProperties())
    {
        if (propertyInfo.PropertyType != typeof(string) && propertyInfo.PropertyType.GetInterfaces().Any(i => collections.Any(c => i == c)))
        {
            continue;
        }

        Console.WriteLine(propertyInfo.Name);
    }
}

I added code to not reject string, as it implements IEnumerable, as well, and I figured you might want to keep those around.

In light of the redundancy of the prior list of collection interfaces, it may be simpler just to write the code like this

static void DoSomething<T>()
{
    foreach (PropertyInfo propertyInfo in typeof(T).GetProperties())
    {
        if (propertyInfo.PropertyType != typeof(string)
            && propertyInfo.PropertyType.GetInterface(typeof(IEnumerable).Name) != null
            && propertyInfo.PropertyType.GetInterface(typeof(IEnumerable<>).Name) != null)
        {
            continue;
        }

        Console.WriteLine(propertyInfo.Name);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Removed my answer as this is better. –  GenericTypeTea May 14 '10 at 14:22
5  
IEnumerable<> implements IEnumerable, there is no need to check for IEnumerable<> –  MaLio May 14 '10 at 15:20

I would probably check against IEnumerable.

if ((typeof(string) != propertyInfo.PropertyType) 
    && typeof(IEnumerable).IsAssignableFrom(propertyInfo.PropertyType))
{
    continue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh oh, now I have a problem...this condition is true also for string property. Is possible? –  LukePet May 14 '10 at 14:51
    
I solve with the other posted solution. –  LukePet May 14 '10 at 15:03
    
@LukePet: Strings implement IEnumerable because they're collections of characters. Anthony's answer specifically excludes strings, so you're right to choose that one (and I've updated my answer to follow suit). –  LukeH May 14 '10 at 15:48
    
Are there other primitive types that implement IEnumerable like 'string'? –  LukePet May 16 '10 at 12:30
    
@LukePet: None that I'm aware of. –  LukeH May 16 '10 at 13:50
bool isCollection = typeof(System.Collections.IEnumerable)
                          .IsAssignableFrom(propertyInfo.PropertyType);
share|improve this answer
    
better than right answer –  JeffZhnn Dec 20 '12 at 12:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.