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Given a method signature:

public bool AreTheSame<T>(Expression<Func<T, object>> exp1, Expression<Func<T, object>> exp2)

What would be the most efficient way to say if the two expressions are the same? This only needs to work for simple expressions, by this I mean all that would be "supported" would be simple MemberExpressions, eg c => c.ID.

An example call might be:

AreTheSame<User>(u1 => u1.ID, u2 => u2.ID); --> would return true
share|improve this question
    
I think a fundamental question would be whether Expressions are anything like anonymous types in that even if you define an identical expression somehwere whether that expression tree is somehow cached by the runtime so that there is always only one underlying definition. this is similar to the flyweight pattern and how strings are implemented in C# and to a degree anonymous class well from my understanding. –  jpierson Jun 17 '10 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Hmmm... I guess you'd have to parse the tree, checking the node-type and member of each. I'll knock up an example...

using System;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
class Test {
    public string Foo { get; set; }
    public string Bar { get; set; }
    static void Main()
    {
        bool test1 = FuncTest<Test>.FuncEqual(x => x.Bar, y => y.Bar),
            test2 = FuncTest<Test>.FuncEqual(x => x.Foo, y => y.Bar);
    }

}
// this only exists to make it easier to call, i.e. so that I can use FuncTest<T> with
// generic-type-inference; if you use the doubly-generic method, you need to specify
// both arguments, which is a pain...
static class FuncTest<TSource>
{
    public static bool FuncEqual<TValue>(
        Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>> x,
        Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>> y)
    {
        return FuncTest.FuncEqual<TSource, TValue>(x, y);
    }
}
static class FuncTest {
    public static bool FuncEqual<TSource, TValue>(
        Expression<Func<TSource,TValue>> x,
        Expression<Func<TSource,TValue>> y)
    {
        return ExpressionEqual(x, y);
    }
    private static bool ExpressionEqual(Expression x, Expression y)
    {
        // deal with the simple cases first...
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;
        if (x == null || y == null) return false;
        if (   x.NodeType != y.NodeType
            || x.Type != y.Type ) return false;

        switch (x.NodeType)
        {
            case ExpressionType.Lambda:
                return ExpressionEqual(((LambdaExpression)x).Body, ((LambdaExpression)y).Body);
            case ExpressionType.MemberAccess:
                MemberExpression mex = (MemberExpression)x, mey = (MemberExpression)y;
                return mex.Member == mey.Member; // should really test down-stream expression
            default:
                throw new NotImplementedException(x.NodeType.ToString());
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
uhmmm 6 minutes and counting.... :) –  kenny Nov 12 '08 at 10:43
1  
Oddly enough, Expression code isn't simple! –  Marc Gravell Nov 12 '08 at 10:47
2  
Expressions annoy me, they are so powerful yet there is so much missing. +1 for the upload codez –  Andrew Bullock Jan 20 '10 at 12:52
    
@MarcGravell, this is awesome with one caveat. Your comparison method assumes the return types of the lambda has to be the same. (string in this case). To make this generic when Foo and Bar are different types, you'll need TValue1 and TValue2. Can you update your answer? –  KFL Mar 13 at 20:09

UPDATE: Due to interest to my solution, I have updated the code so it supports arrays and compares the ASTs in more elegant way.

Here is an improved version of Marc's code:

public static class LambdaCompare
{
    public static bool Eq<TSource, TValue>(
        Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>> x,
        Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>> y)
    {
        return ExpressionsEqual(x, y, null, null);
    }

    public static Expression<Func<Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>>, bool>> Eq<TSource, TValue>(Expression<Func<TSource, TValue>> y)
    {
        return x => ExpressionsEqual(x, y, null, null);
    }

    private static bool ExpressionsEqual(Expression x, Expression y, LambdaExpression rootX, LambdaExpression rootY)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;
        if (x == null || y == null) return false;

        var valueX = TryCalculateConstant(x);
        var valueY = TryCalculateConstant(y);

        if (valueX.IsDefined && valueY.IsDefined)
            return ValuesEqual(valueX.Value, valueY.Value);

        if (x.NodeType != y.NodeType
            || x.Type != y.Type) return false;

        if (x is LambdaExpression)
        {
            var lx = (LambdaExpression) x;
            var ly = (LambdaExpression) y;
            var paramsX = lx.Parameters;
            var paramsY = ly.Parameters;
            return CollectionsEqual(paramsX, paramsY, lx, ly) && ExpressionsEqual(lx.Body, ly.Body, lx, ly);
        }
        if (x is MemberExpression)
        {
            var mex = (MemberExpression) x;
            var mey = (MemberExpression) y;
            return Equals(mex.Member, mey.Member) && ExpressionsEqual(mex.Expression, mey.Expression, rootX, rootY);
        }
        if (x is BinaryExpression)
        {
            var bx = (BinaryExpression) x;
            var by = (BinaryExpression) y;
            return bx.Method == @by.Method && ExpressionsEqual(bx.Left, @by.Left, rootX, rootY) &&
                   ExpressionsEqual(bx.Right, @by.Right, rootX, rootY);
        }
        if (x is ParameterExpression)
        {
            var px = (ParameterExpression) x;
            var py = (ParameterExpression) y;
            return rootX.Parameters.IndexOf(px) == rootY.Parameters.IndexOf(py);
        }
        if (x is MethodCallExpression)
        {
            var cx = (MethodCallExpression)x;
            var cy = (MethodCallExpression)y;
            return cx.Method == cy.Method
                   && ExpressionsEqual(cx.Object, cy.Object, rootX, rootY)
                   && CollectionsEqual(cx.Arguments, cy.Arguments, rootX, rootY);
        }

        throw new NotImplementedException(x.ToString());
    }

    private static bool ValuesEqual(object x, object y)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(x, y))
            return true;
        if (x is ICollection && y is ICollection)
            return CollectionsEqual((ICollection) x, (ICollection) y);

        return Equals(x, y);
    }

    private static ConstantValue TryCalculateConstant(Expression e)
    {
        if (e is ConstantExpression)
            return new ConstantValue(true, ((ConstantExpression) e).Value);
        if (e is MemberExpression)
        {
            var me = (MemberExpression) e;
            var parentValue = TryCalculateConstant(me.Expression);
            if (parentValue.IsDefined)
            {
                var result =
                    me.Member is FieldInfo
                        ? ((FieldInfo) me.Member).GetValue(parentValue.Value)
                        : ((PropertyInfo) me.Member).GetValue(parentValue.Value);
                return new ConstantValue(true, result);
            }
        }
        if (e is NewArrayExpression)
        {
            var ae = ((NewArrayExpression) e);
            var result = ae.Expressions.Select(TryCalculateConstant);
            if (result.All(i => i.IsDefined))
                return new ConstantValue(true, result.Select(i => i.Value).ToArray());
        }

        return default(ConstantValue);
    }

    private static bool CollectionsEqual(IEnumerable<Expression> x, IEnumerable<Expression> y, LambdaExpression rootX, LambdaExpression rootY)
    {
        return x.Count() == y.Count()
               && x.Select((e, i) => new {Expr = e, Index = i})
                   .Join(y.Select((e, i) => new { Expr = e, Index = i }),
                         o => o.Index, o => o.Index, (xe, ye) => new { X = xe.Expr, Y = ye.Expr })
                   .All(o => ExpressionsEqual(o.X, o.Y, rootX, rootY));
    }

    private static bool CollectionsEqual(ICollection x, ICollection y)
    {
        return x.Count == y.Count
               && x.Cast<object>().Select((e, i) => new { Expr = e, Index = i })
                   .Join(y.Cast<object>().Select((e, i) => new { Expr = e, Index = i }),
                         o => o.Index, o => o.Index, (xe, ye) => new { X = xe.Expr, Y = ye.Expr })
                   .All(o => Equals(o.X, o.Y));
    }

    private struct ConstantValue
    {
        public ConstantValue(bool isDefined, object value) : this()
        {
            IsDefined = isDefined;
            Value = value;
        }

        public bool IsDefined { get; private set; }

        public object Value { get; private set; }
    }
}

Note that it does not compare full AST. Instead, it collapses constant expressions and compares their values rather than their AST. It is useful for mocks validation when the lambda has a reference to local variable. In his case the variable is compared by its value.

share|improve this answer
    
What does 'AST' mean? –  bump Oct 2 '14 at 13:17
1  
Abstract Syntax Tree –  neleus Oct 6 '14 at 13:42
    
Great job, working like a charm –  Nock Oct 22 '14 at 11:25
    
I have improved the code, now it covers more cases. –  neleus Oct 24 '14 at 10:06

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