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I have this JSON in a file:

{
    "maps": [
        {
            "id": "blabla",
            "iscategorical": "0"
        },
        {
            "id": "blabla",
            "iscategorical": "0"
        }
    ],
    "masks": [
        "id": "valore"
    ],
    "om_points": "value",
    "parameters": [
        "id": "valore"
    ]
}

I wrote this script which prints all of the json text:

json_data=open(file_directory).read()

data = json.loads(json_data)
pprint(data)

How can I parse the file and extract single values?

share|improve this question
up vote 756 down vote accepted

I think what Ignacio is saying is that your json file is incorrect. You have []s when you should have {}s. []s are for lists, {}s are for dictionaries. Here's how your json file should look (your json file wouldn't even load for me):

{
    "maps": [
        {
            "id": "blabla",
            "iscategorical": "0"
        },
        {
            "id": "blabla",
            "iscategorical": "0"
        }
    ],
    "masks": {
        "id": "valore"
    },
    "om_points": "value",
    "parameters": {
        "id": "valore"
    }
}

Then you can use your code:

import json
from pprint import pprint

with open('data.json') as data_file:    
    data = json.load(data_file)

pprint(data)

With data, you can now also find values like so:

data["maps"][0]["id"]
data["masks"]["id"]
data["om_points"]

Try those out and see if it starts to make sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok so I have to control my code because this json file is generated from a java object. Thanks. – michele May 14 '10 at 16:26
9  
Actually, I think you should have used 'with' in your answer. I still gave a +1 though because I think it is valuable for a newcomer. – lpapp Nov 7 '13 at 17:57
3  
Thanks for the solution. i'm getting a unicode symbol while printing it. (eg u'valore' ). How to prevent it? – diaryfolio Jan 30 '15 at 15:36
2  
Nice but python adds a u' before each key. Any idea why? – CodyBugstein Jul 5 '15 at 7:14
3  
That is why your text is type unicode not string. Most time it is better to have text in unicode for german umlauts and for sharing text results with other modules/programs etc. . So you're good! – Michael P Aug 29 '15 at 11:56

Your data.json should look like this:

{
 "maps":[
         {"id":"blabla","iscategorical":"0"},
         {"id":"blabla","iscategorical":"0"}
        ],
"masks":
         {"id":"valore"},
"om_points":"value",
"parameters":
         {"id":"valore"}
}

Your code should be:

import json
from pprint import pprint

with open('data.json') as data_file:    
    data = json.load(data_file)
pprint(data)

Note that this only works in Python 2.6 and up, as it depends upon the with-statement. In Python 2.5 use from __future__ import with_statement, in Python <= 2.4, see Justin Peel's answer, which this answer is based upon.

You can now also access single values like this:

data["maps"][0]["id"]  # will return 'blabla'
data["masks"]["id"]    # will return 'valore'
data["om_points"]      # will return 'value'
share|improve this answer
2  
I got a downvote on this. Maybe it was not clear, why I thought another answer was necessary. Added note on compatibility of the with-statement. – Bengt Feb 26 '13 at 19:57
    
Sorry for the roll back, but the suggested code would keep data_file opened longer than necessary. – Bengt May 25 '13 at 12:10
    
Referring to 2.6 documentation (docs.python.org/2.6/library/io.html), opening a file in the "with" context will automatically close the file. – Steve S. Jun 16 '15 at 1:54
1  
@SteveS. Yes, but not before the context is left. pprinting in the with-context keeps the data_file open longer. – Bengt Jun 16 '15 at 17:45
data = []
with codecs.open('d:\output.txt','rU','utf-8') as f:
    for line in f:
       data.append(json.loads(line))
share|improve this answer
    
this is the correct solution if you have multiple json objects in a file. json.loads does not decode multiple json objects. Otherwise, you get 'Extra Data' error. – yasin_alm Mar 21 at 21:43
    
This is the best answer. Otherwise, it gives 'Extra Data' error. – Earthx9 Jun 11 at 12:05

@Justin Peel's answer is really helpful.But if you are using Python 3,read json code should be like this:

with open('data.json', encoding='utf-8') as data_file:
    data = json.loads(data_file.read())

Note: use json.loads instead of json.load.In python 3, The json.loads take string parameter. The json.load take file-like object parameter.And the method data_file.read() return string object.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why should json.load be avoided in favor of .loads in Python 3? – Zearin Jul 16 '15 at 14:55
    
@Zearin pls check the official doc. – Geng Jiawen Jul 17 '15 at 2:13
2  
The page you linked doesn't say anything about avoiding load. – Dan Hulme Mar 19 at 17:58
    
@Dan Hulme, Because data_file.read() return a string.The json.loads take string parameters. The json.load take file-like object. – Geng Jiawen 2 days ago

Ultra JSON or simply ujson can handle having [] in your json file input. If you're reading a json input file into your program as a list of json elements; such as, [{[{}]}, {}, [], etc...] ujson can handle any arbitrary order of lists of dictionaries, dictionaries of lists.

You can find ujson in the python package index https://pypi.python.org/pypi/ujson and the api is almost identical to python's built-in json library.

ujson is also much more faster if you're loading larger json files. You can see the performance details in comparison to other python json libraries in the same link provided.

share|improve this answer

protected by hjpotter92 Jan 26 '14 at 10:24

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