Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a struct named Game with an array of levels, defined like this:

typedef struct 
{
     Level levels[x];
} Game;

When I compile the code, if x is 1, 2 or 3, the program runs normally. If it's any other value (4, for instance), I get a segmentation fault. I'm not accessing the array anywhere. Main is something like this at the moment (commented everything except the initialization):

int main (...)
{
     Game g;

     return 0;
}

Any clue of what this might be?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
Can we please see what level is, or at least the size of it as far as static allocation goes? I have a hunch its huge. –  Tim Post May 14 '10 at 16:45
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How big is a Level? Is it possible you're overflowing your stack? Given that there's (apparently) only ever one Game object anyway, perhaps you'd be better off using the static storage class, as in: static Game g;

Edit: If you want to force allocation on the heap, I'd advise using std::vector<Level> levels; rather than using pointers directly. Oops -- missed it's being tagged C, not C++.

share|improve this answer
2  
I'd agree that he's probably overflowing the stack, but the question isn't c++ :) –  Tim Post May 14 '10 at 16:43
    
Or you can just move the declaration of g outside the main() function. –  Mark Bessey May 14 '10 at 17:32
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I just used static since I only have one object and it works that way. The program didn't cause a segmentation fault on my computer, but it caused on the one I was using at the time (it's really old so that was probably the problem). Level is a big class but I assumed it wouldn't cause a segmentation fault anyways. –  user228938 May 14 '10 at 22:05
add comment

If the Level class/struct is really big, you could try using this:

typedef struct {
    Level *levels;
} Game;

and then allocating your levels with malloc() or new. Or if you really need an array of levels:

typedef struct {
    Level* levels[NUM_LEVELS];
} Game;

then allocating levels with something like this:

// Allocate levels
int i;
for(i=0;i<NUM_LEVELS;i++) {
    gameStruct.levels[i] = (Level*)malloc(sizeof(Level));
    initLevelNum(gameStruct.levels[i], i);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

On my machine, this code

typedef struct {
    char data[65536*4];
} Level;

typedef struct 
{
     Level levels[4];
} Game;

int main (...)
{
     Game g;

     return 0;
}

crashes, while it doesn't if I change the size of the levels array to 3.

You should either reduce the size of your Level type (by putting data on the heap instead of the stack) or putting your levels on the heap (by keeping them in an array of pointers to dynamically allocated Level objects).

share|improve this answer
    
You could also make level global. It probably isn't used in such a way that that would be a problem. –  nategoose May 14 '10 at 17:57
add comment

If you indeed have the size of your data and insist on having it stack allocated perhaps setting the stack size on the linker would be an option. If i am wrong please correct me as i find this topic interesting

share|improve this answer
add comment

Usually, in similar cases you must declare the variable static:

int main(void) {
    static struct foo bar[SIZE];

    return 0;
}

Thus the variable will have been allocated and inserted into static area in compiled time.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.