Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was doing some dynamic effect on DIV using JQuery when I found that
the returned value of this.id varied from function to function.

I got two sets of simple parent-child DIV tags like this:

        <DIV ID="row">
        <DIV ID="c1">              
        <Input type="radio" name="testing" id="testing" VALUE="1">testing1
        </DIV>
        </DIV> 
        <DIV ID="row">
        <DIV ID="c2">              
        <Input type="radio" name="testing" id="testing" VALUE="2">testing2
        </DIV>
        </DIV> 

Code 1.

$('#row DIV').mouseover(function(){ 
radio_btns.each(function() {
$('#row DIV).addClass('testing');  // worked
});
});


Code 2.

$('#row DIV').mouseover(function(){ 
var childDivID = this.id;
radio_btns.each(function() {
$('#'+childDivID).parent('DIV').addClass('testing');  // didn't work
});
});


I don't understand why only the first code could work
and highlighted all the "row" DIV,
but the second code failed to do so?

share|improve this question
    
    
You mean "but the second code failed to do so"? –  edwin May 14 '10 at 19:18
1  
You can't have two elements with the same id on the same page. –  edwin May 14 '10 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you have the same ID multiple times, this will lead to all sorts of odd behavior since it's invalid HTML.

Once that's corrected, for the second code example, you need an adjustment to highlight the current row on hover (note .row is now a class to eliminate the ID issue), like this:

$('.row div').mouseover(function(){
    $('#'+this.id).parent('div').addClass('testing');
});​

However, there's a better way to go about this since you already have the reference to the object, like this:

$('.row div').mouseover(function(){
    $(this).addClass('testing');
});​

Generally speaking, I can't think of a case where you'd want to use $("#"+this.id), if you have this, it should be $(this) to get the jQuery object you want.

One more item, outside the question really, if you wanted a hover in this case, use .hover() and .toggleClass(), like this:

$('.row div').hover(function(){
    $(this).toggleClass('testing');
});​
share|improve this answer
    
why it is .row instead of #row? Are they different in meaning in JQuery? –  user327712 May 18 '10 at 18:51
    
@kwokwai - They are, .row searches for elements with a class of row, #row looks for elements with an id of row. –  Nick Craver May 18 '10 at 19:25

try this:

var childDivID = $(this).attr('id');
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.