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I have an application that uses ASP.NET Forms Authentication. For the most part, it's working great, but I'm trying to add support for a simple API via an .ashx file. I want the ashx file to have optional authentication (i.e. if you don't supply an Authentication header, then it just works anonymously). But, depending on what you do, I want to require authentication under certain conditions.

I thought it would be a simple matter of responding with status code 401 if the required authentication was not supplied, but it seems like the Forms Authentcation module is intercepting that and responding with a redirect to the login page instead. What I mean is, if my ProcessRequest method looks like this:

public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
{
    Response.StatusCode = 401;
    Response.StatusDescription = "Authentication required";
}

Then instead of getting a 401 error code on the client, like I expect, I'm actually getting a 302 redirect to the login page.

For nornal HTTP traffic, I can see how that would be useful, but for my API page, I want the 401 to go through unmodified so that the client-side caller can respond to it programmatically instead.

Is there any way to do that?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 25 down vote accepted

ASP.NET 4.5 added the Boolean HttpResponse.SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect property.

public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context)
{
    Response.StatusCode = 401;
    Response.StatusDescription = "Authentication required";
    Response.SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect = true;
}
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This is the answer for anyone using .NET 4.5. Too bad I didn't read this far in the list and I had to find this on my own in the decompiled sources! –  Kevin Coulombe Jul 1 '13 at 22:08
    
You can put this in the Global.asax Application_EndRequest event to apply this across your entire application. For Example. –  David Sherret Oct 24 '13 at 1:29
1  
I used a similar snippet in the Application_BeginRequest method with great success. Is the request AJAX? Set the flag immediately. –  Tyler Forsythe Jan 3 at 21:25
1  
Thanks, I'm marking this as the accepted answer now, since this definitely looks like the way to go now. –  Dean Harding Jan 4 at 8:50

After a bit of investigation, it looks like the FormsAuthenticationModule adds a handler for the HttpApplicationContext.EndRequest event. In it's handler, it checks for a 401 status code and basically does a Response.Redirect(loginUrl) instead. As far as I can tell, there's no way to override this behaviour if want to use FormsAuthenticationModule.

The way I ended up getting around it was by disabling the FormsAuthenticationModule in the web.config like so:

<authentication mode="None" />

And then implementing the Application_AuthenticateEvent myself:

void Application_AuthenticateRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (Context.User == null)
    {
        var oldTicket = ExtractTicketFromCookie(Context, FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName);
        if (oldTicket != null && !oldTicket.Expired)
        {
            var ticket = oldTicket;
            if (FormsAuthentication.SlidingExpiration)
            {
                ticket = FormsAuthentication.RenewTicketIfOld(oldTicket);
                if (ticket == null)
                    return;
            }

            Context.User = new GenericPrincipal(new FormsIdentity(ticket), new string[0]);
            if (ticket != oldTicket)
            {
                // update the cookie since we've refreshed the ticket
                string cookieValue = FormsAuthentication.Encrypt(ticket);
                var cookie = Context.Request.Cookies[FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName] ??
                             new HttpCookie(FormsAuthentication.FormsCookieName, cookieValue) { Path = ticket.CookiePath };

                if (ticket.IsPersistent)
                    cookie.Expires = ticket.Expiration;
                cookie.Value = cookieValue;
                cookie.Secure = FormsAuthentication.RequireSSL;
                cookie.HttpOnly = true;
                if (FormsAuthentication.CookieDomain != null)
                    cookie.Domain = FormsAuthentication.CookieDomain;
                Context.Response.Cookies.Remove(cookie.Name);
                Context.Response.Cookies.Add(cookie);
            }
        }
    }
}

private static FormsAuthenticationTicket ExtractTicketFromCookie(HttpContext context, string name)
{
    FormsAuthenticationTicket ticket = null;
    string encryptedTicket = null;

    var cookie = context.Request.Cookies[name];
    if (cookie != null)
    {
        encryptedTicket = cookie.Value;
    }

    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(encryptedTicket))
    {
        try
        {
            ticket = FormsAuthentication.Decrypt(encryptedTicket);
        }
        catch
        {
            context.Request.Cookies.Remove(name);
        }

        if (ticket != null && !ticket.Expired)
        {
            return ticket;
        }

        // if the ticket is expired then remove it
        context.Request.Cookies.Remove(name);
        return null;
    }
}

It's actually slightly more complicated than that, but I basically got the code by looking at the implementation of FormsAuthenticationModule in reflector. My implementation is different to the built-in FormsAuthenticationModule in that it doesn't do anything if you respond with a 401 - no redirecting to the login page at all. I guess if that ever becomes a requirement, I can put an item in the context to disable the auto-redirect or something.

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1  
This also works very well in ASP.NET MVC. –  Dave Van den Eynde Mar 3 '12 at 13:52
    
Note: the answer by zacharydl above is the way to go in ASP.NET 4.5+ –  Dean Harding Jan 4 at 8:52

I'm not sure if this will work for everyone, but in IIS7 you can call Response.End() after you've set the status code and description. This way, that #&$^#@*! FormsAuthenticationModule won't do a redirect.

public void ProcessRequest(HttpContext context) {
    Response.StatusCode = 401;
    Response.StatusDescription = "Authentication required";
    Response.End();
}
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4  
Here is another solution I recently blogged about a few weeks ago: blog.inedo.com/2010/10/12/… –  John Rasch Nov 3 '10 at 4:14
3  
Nice one John! Isn't it ridiculous how hard we have to work to get around this? HttpContext has a SkipAuthorization property, it would be nice if it had SkipLoginRedirect too. Or if forms authentication could be scoped and overridden by directories. –  Luke Sampson Nov 4 '10 at 6:43
    
When I was trying this out, I was on IIS 6 and I think it works a bit differently for IIS 7 vs IIS 6 (i.e. in IIS 6, Response.End() just throws a ThreadAbortException which the forms authentication module was catching - meaning it still did the logic redirect for me). –  Dean Harding Nov 15 '10 at 8:15
    
Great this worked! –  Alan Christensen Apr 30 '12 at 4:49
1  
This works, however control will go to FormsAuthenticationModule anyway and its EndRequest event handler will try to do the redirect and since the responce has been End()ed, this triggers an exception which is logged in the system event log, also Application_Error() is called. –  sharptooth Feb 19 '13 at 14:21

what you've found out is correct about the forms auth intercepting the 401 and doing a redirect but we also can do that to reverse that.

Basically what you need is an http module to intercept the 302 redirect to the login page and reverse it to a 401.

Steps on doing that is explained in here

The given link is about a WCF service but it is the same in all the forms auth scenarios.

As explained in the above link you need to clear the http headers as well but remember to put the cookie header back to the response if the original response (i.e. before intercepting) contained any cookies.

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Hmm, yes, that's an interesting idea! Of course, I've already got a solution that works for me, but I'm sure someone else might find this a better solution. Thanks! –  Dean Harding Nov 15 '10 at 8:12
    
Seems like a hack likely to have similarly weird side effects! –  Alan Christensen Apr 30 '12 at 4:48

I don't know how that Response.End() worked for you. I tried it with no joy, then looked at MSDN for Response.End(): 'stops execution of the page, and raises the EndRequest event'.

For what it's worth my hack was:

_response.StatusCode = 401;
_context.Items["401Override"] = true;
_response.End();

Then in Global.cs add an EndRequest handler (which will get called after Authentication HTTPModule):

protected void Application_EndRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (HttpContext.Current.Items["401Override"] != null)
    {
        HttpContext.Current.Response.Clear();
        HttpContext.Current.Response.StatusCode = 401;
    }
}
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I know there is already an answer with tick but while trying to solve similar problem I found this (http://blog.inedo.com/2010/10/12/http-418-im-a-teapot-finally-a-%e2%80%9clegitimate%e2%80%9d-use/) as an alternative.

Basically you return your own HTTP status code (e.g. 418) in your code. In my case a WCF data service.

throw new DataServiceException(418, "401 Unauthorized");

Then use a HTTP module to handle it at the EndRequest event to rewrite the code back to 401.

HttpApplication app = (HttpApplication)sender;
if (app.Context.Response.StatusCode == 418)
{
    app.Context.Response.StatusCode = 401;
}

The browser / client will receive the correct content and status code, it works great for me :)

If you are interested to learn more about HTTP status code 418 see this question & answer.

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Great! It works like I want it to work :) instead adding dedicated http module I used "global.asax" event EndRequest. It is possible to hook on this event overriding "Init" method –  Pavlo Neyman Jul 27 '11 at 20:58
    
this just returns the IIS 401 error page for me –  DevDave Sep 2 '13 at 12:18

To build on zacharydl's answer slightly, I used this to solve my woes. On every request, at the beginning, if it's AJAX, immediately suppress the behavior.

protected void Application_BeginRequest()
{
    HttpRequestBase request = new HttpRequestWrapper(Context.Request);
    if (request.IsAjaxRequest())
    {
        Context.Response.SuppressFormsAuthenticationRedirect = true;
    }
}
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That's a known issue, and there's a NuGet Package for that and/or the source code available.

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You do not set the WWW-Authenticate header in the code you show, so the client cannot do HTTP authentication instead of forms authentication. If this is the case, you should use 403 instead of 401, which will not be intercepted by the FormsAuthenticaitonModule.

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Look inside your Web.config file in configuration\authentication. If there is a forms subelement there with a loginUrl attribute, remove it and try again.

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2  
Removing that just changed the URL it redirects to /login.aspx instead of my custom one. I want to keep Forms Authentication for "normal" pages anyway, just for this one .ashx file I wanted to change it. –  Dean Harding May 15 '10 at 8:30

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