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I have a problem when I try to center the div block "products" because I don't know in advance the div width. Anybody have a solution?

Update: The problem I have is I don't know how many products I'll display, I can have 1, 2 or 3 products, I can center them if it was a fixed number as I'd know the width of the parent div, I just don't know how to do it when the content is dynamic.

<style>
    .product_container {
        text-align:    center;
        height:        150px;
    }

    .products {
        height:        140px;
        text-align:    center;
        margin:        0 auto;
        clear:         ccc both; 
    }
    .price {
        margin:        6px 2px;
        width:         137px;
        color:         #666;
        font-size:     14pt;
        font-style:    normal;
        border:        1px solid #CCC;
        background-color:   #EFEFEF;
    }
</style>

<div class="product_container">
    <div class="products" id="products">
       <div id="product_15">
           <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
           <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
       </div>

       <div id="product_15">
           <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
           <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
       </div>   

       <div id="product_15">
           <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
           <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
       </div>
    </div>
</div>
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What exactly is the problem you are having? –  anand_trex Nov 12 '08 at 13:45
    
and in which browser? –  Sekhat Nov 12 '08 at 13:50
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15 Answers

You might want to try this approach from tightcss.com.

<div class="product_container">
    <div class="outer-center">
        <div class="product inner-center">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="clear"></div>
</div>

Here's the matching style:

.outer-center {
    float: right;
    right: 50%;
    position: relative;
}
.inner-center {
    float: right;
    right: -50%;
    position: relative;
}
.clear {
    clear: both;
}

The idea here is that you contain the content you want to center in two divs, an outer one and an inner one. You float both divs so that their widths automatically shrink to fit your content. Next, you relatively position the outer div with it's right edge in the center of the container. Lastly, you relatively position the inner div the opposite direction by half of its own width (actually the outer div's width, but they are the same). Ultimately that centers the content in whatever container it's in.

Check out the pictures on the website and it'll be clear.

You may need that empty div at the end if you depend on your "product" content to size the height for the "product_container".

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3  
This is proper solution! –  simPod May 22 '12 at 16:40
    
Does not work in IE7 –  Kaizoku Aug 2 '12 at 6:51
1  
If you dont provide overflow:hidden for .product_container the outer-center div will overlap other nearby contents to the right of it. Any links or buttons to the right of outer-center wont work. Try background color for outer-center to understand the need for overflow :hidden. This was a suggested edit by Cicil Thomas –  Benjol Aug 10 '12 at 9:59
46  
Wrapping your div in two additional divs is considered a good solution? Great job CSS, great job... –  fgysin Jan 8 '13 at 10:47
1  
Tell me about it! Sometimes we simply need a solution and don't have the luxury of having a good one to choose. A single-cell table is another option, although a table with one cell isn't really a table, is it? –  Mike M. Lin Jan 9 '13 at 18:03
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An element with ‘display: block’ (as div is by default) has a width determined by the width of its container. You can't make a block's width dependent on the width of its contents (shrink-to-fit).

(Except for blocks that are ‘float: left/right’ in CSS 2.1, but that's no use for centering.)

You could set the ‘display’ property to ‘inline-block’ to turn a block into a shrink-to-fit object that can be controlled by its parent's text-align property, but browser support is spotty. You can mostly get away with it by using hacks (eg. see -moz-inline-stack) if you want to go that way.

The other way to go is tables. This can be necessary when you have columns whose width really can't be known in advance. I can't really tell what you're trying to do from the example code — there's nothing obvious in there that would need a shrink-to-fit block — but a list of products could possibly be considered tabular.

[PS. never use ‘pt’ for font sizes on the web. ‘px’ is more reliable if you really need fixed size text, otherwise relative units like ‘%’ are better. And “clear: ccc both” — a typo?]

.center{
   text-align:center; 
}

.center > div{ /* N.B. child combinators don't work in IE7 or less */
   display:inline-block;
}
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37  
parent -> text-align:center | child-> display:inline-block –  mdskinner Jul 5 '11 at 3:17
4  
display: inline-block is not supported in IE7 and older versions of Firefox –  Jakobud Dec 6 '11 at 17:58
    
@Jakobud Actually it works, but only if you apply it to an element that has display:inline by default. –  easwee Oct 9 '12 at 15:19
    
@Jakobud, for IE7 use "display: inline; zoom: 1;" instead of "display: inline-block;". It works for block elements. –  mkharitonov May 1 '13 at 13:27
    
check out this link for more information on how to use this method cross browser - blog.mozilla.org/webdev/2009/02/20/cross-browser-inline-block –  keyoke Jan 28 at 15:56
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I found a more elegant solution, combining "inline-block" to avoid using float and the hacky clear:both. It still requires nested divs tho, which isnt very semantic but it just works...

div.outer{
    display:inline-block;
    position:relative;
    left:50%;
}

div.inner{
    position:relative;
    left:-50%;
}

Hope it helps!

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Today, modern browsers support the display: table; CSS rule. This is a good trick to center a div in a container without adding extra HTML nor applying constraining styles to the container (like text-align: center; which would center all other inline content in the container), while keeping dynamic width for the contained div:

HTML:

<div class="container">
  <div class="centered">This content is centered</div>
</div>

CSS:

.container { width: 100%; } /* optional, put whatever you want or nothing */
.centered { display: table; margin: 0 auto; }

Online demo: http://jsfiddle.net/t49ZM/

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2  
I think this is definitely the best solution. Doesn't involve any strange hacks with floating nested divs, or anything like that. I think the only reason it's not rated higher is because people have gone too far against tables. This isn't a table, so I think it's a perfectly legitimate method. –  Dan Jones May 23 at 15:29
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This will center an element such as an Ordered List, or Unordered List, or any element. Just wrap it with a Div with the class of outerElement and give the inner element the class of innerElement.

The outerelement class accounts for IE, old Mozilla, and most newer browsers.

 .outerElement {
        display: -moz-inline-stack;
        display: inline-block;
        vertical-align: middle;
        zoom: 1;
        position: relative;
        left: 50%;
    }

.innerElement {
    position: relative;
    left: -50%;
} 
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Please add a description with your code. Posting code on it's own won't mean much to future visitors of SO. –  Ren Nov 16 '12 at 9:13
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By default, div elements are displayed as block elements, so they have 100% width, making centering them meaningless. As suggested by Arief, you must specify a width and you can then use auto when specifying margin in order to center a div.

Alternatively, you could also force display: inline, but then you'd have something that pretty much behaves like a span instead of a div, so that doesn't make a lot of sense.

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I'm afraid the only way to do this without explicitly specifying the width is to use (gasp) tables.

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5  
rephrased: If you don't want to spend the next hour trying all kind of combination of CSS, nested DIVs, and browsers, go directly to tables. –  Eduardo Molteni Apr 27 '09 at 13:37
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Slight variation on Mike M. Lin's answer

If you add overflow: auto; ( or hidden ) to div.product_container, then you don't need div.clear.

This is derived from this article -> http://www.quirksmode.org/css/clearing.html

Here is modified HTML:

<div class="product_container">
    <div class="outer-center">
        <div class="product inner-center">
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

And here is modified CSS:

.product_container {
  overflow: auto;
  /* width property only required if you want to support IE6 */
  width: 100%;
}

.outer-center {
  float: right;
  right: 50%;
  position: relative;
}

.inner-center {
  float: right;
  right: -50%;
  position: relative;
}

The reason, why it's better without div.clear (apart that it feels wrong to have an empty element) is Firefox'es overzealous margin assignment.

If, for example, you have this html:

<div class="product_container">
    <div class="outer-center">
        <div class="product inner-center">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div style="clear: both;"></div>
</div>
<p style="margin-top: 11px;">Some text</p>

then, in Firefox (8.0 at the point of writing), you will see 11px margin before product_container. What's worse, is that you will get a vertical scroll bar for the whole page, even if the content fits nicely into the screen dimensions.

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Try this new css and markup

Here is modified HTML:

<div class="product_container">
<div class="products" id="products">
   <div id="product_15" class="products_box">
       <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
       <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
   </div>
   <div id="product_15" class="products_box">
       <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
       <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
   </div>   
   <div id="product_15" class="products_box">
       <img src="/images/ecommerce/card_default.png">
       <div class="price">R$ 0,01</div>
   </div>
</div>

And here is modified CSS:

<pre>
.product_container 
 {
 text-align:    center;
 height:        150px;
 }

.products {
    left: 50%;
height:35px;
float:left;
position: relative;
margin: 0 auto;
width:auto;
}
.products .products_box
{
width:auto;
height:auto;
float:left;
  right: 50%;
  position: relative;
}
.price {
    margin:        6px 2px;
    width:         137px;
    color:         #666;
    font-size:     14pt;
    font-style:    normal;
    border:        1px solid #CCC;
    background-color:   #EFEFEF;
}

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I found interesting solution, I was making slider and had to center slide controls and I did this and works fine. You can also add relative position to parent and move child position vertical. Take a look http://jsfiddle.net/bergb/6DvJz/

CSS:

#parent{
        width:600px;
        height:400px;
        background:#ffcc00;
        text-align:center;
    }

#child{
        display:inline-block;
        margin:0 auto;
        background:#fff;
    }  

HTML:

<div id="parent">
    <div id="child">voila</div>
</div>
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Crappy fix, but it does work...

CSS:

#mainContent {
    position:absolute;
    width:600px;
    background:#FFFF99;
}

#sidebar {
    float:left;
    margin-left:610px;
    max-width:300;
    background:#FFCCCC;
}
#sidebar{


    text-align:center;
}

HTML:

<center>
<table border="0" cellspacing="0">
  <tr>
    <td>
<div id="mainContent">
1<br/>
<br/>
123<br/>
123<br/>
123<br/>
</div><div id="sidebar"><br/>
</div></td>
</tr>
</table>
</center>
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Simple fix that works in old browsers (but does use tables, and requires a height to be set):

<div style="width:100%;height:40px;position:absolute;top:50%;margin-top:-20px;">
  <table style="width:100%"><tr><td align="center">
    In the middle
  </td></tr></table>
</div>
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<div class="product_container">
<div class="outer-center">
<div class="product inner-center">
    </div>
</div>
<div class="clear"></div>
</div>

.outer-center
{
float: right;
right: 50%;
position: relative;
}
.inner-center 
{
float: right;
right: -50%;
position: relative;
}
.clear 
{
clear: both;
}

.product_container
{
overflow:hidden;
}

If you dont provide "overflow:hidden" for ".product_container" the "outer-center" div will overlap other nearby contents to the right of it. Any links or buttons to the right of "outer-center" wont work. Try background color for "outer-center" to understand the need of "overflow :hidden"

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<style type="text/css">
.container_box{
    text-align:center
}
.content{
    padding:10px;
    background:#ff0000;
    color:#ffffff;

}

use span istead of the inner divs

<div class="container_box">
   <span class="content">Hello</span>
</div>
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This question is 5 years old. –  jah Apr 21 '13 at 16:04
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add this css to your product_container class

    margin: 0px auto;
    padding: 0px;
    border:0;
    width: 700px;
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