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It should give me the number of inputs entered by the user. But it gives 100. I compiled with gcc.

#include <stdio.h>

int arr[100];
int count=0;
int max=100;


int main(){
 int i, input;
 printf("Enter integer values one by one, q to quit.\n");
 for(i=0;i<max;i++){
  scanf("%d",&input);
  arr[i]=input;
  if(input=='q')break;
  count++;
 }
 printf("You entered %d values.\n",count);
 return 0;
}
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2  
Needs homework tag ? –  Paul R May 15 '10 at 10:46
    
Try using an integer value, like -1, instead of 'q'. –  Paul R May 15 '10 at 10:47
4  
You can exit by entering 113. –  kennytm May 15 '10 at 10:48
    
@Paul-R Its not my college homework. Its a self practice. I was developing a larger program which apparently stuck me for hours. Later I found the trap, cut shorted to make it into a simpler situation and posted :) And yeah, I want it the q way, not a no. like -1. I did with strings. Works fine now. @Kenny Putting 113 doesn't work. –  Prab May 15 '10 at 11:09
    
Obligatory: don't use scanf. c-faq.com/stdio/scanfprobs.html –  jamesdlin May 15 '10 at 16:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you are reading into a numeric variable, it can't really have the value 'q', so your test won't work. If you want to write code like this, you should read user input into a string, check to see if the string contains "q" and if not convert it to an integer.

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4  
Maybe you're supposed to type 113 to exit –  Matti Virkkunen May 15 '10 at 10:46
    
@ Matti It did occur to me to suggest that, but I thought it would be too cruel... –  anon May 15 '10 at 10:47
    
That's a bit incorrect... a numerical variable can have a value of 'q' - i.e. ascii code of q. char is technically an integer number. It will work if user enters ascii value of 'q' as a decimal number. –  SigTerm May 15 '10 at 10:48
    
@SigTerm: I think Neil was just trying to avoid confusing the poor fellow –  Matti Virkkunen May 15 '10 at 10:51
    
@SigTerm I agree with you. I coded using the same logic but it didn't work out. Although it worked with the string way, as Neil wrote, but I want it the char/int way. –  Prab May 15 '10 at 11:10

scanf has a return value. Use it to test if scanf was actually able to parse anything. In your scenario, 'q' will never be stored in the variable input, being it as a char or numerical representation. You cannot read "q" as "%d" and therefore scanf will silently fail.

Test for the return value of scanf to decide for a break.

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scanf is returning me 0 if I enter q and 1 if I enter any integer. –  Prab May 15 '10 at 11:11
    
Exactly. Scanf returns the numbers of variables that could successfully be parsed/stored. So if it is less than you want, you can expect failure and in your case, do the 'break'; Read the manpage of scanf for a thorough explanation. –  ypnos May 15 '10 at 11:31

scanf %d does not understand 'q'. You can check the return value of scanf though - if it returns 0 the user did not enter a valid number.

If only q and not other non-numeric strings should terminate the loop, read into a string and check if it's q and if not convert it to an int with atoi().

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I like this answer! –  Prab May 15 '10 at 11:12

Cute. Entering 'q' causes the scanf to fail, with input left at whatever the last value was. This broken loop continues to the end of the range. The test input=='q' never succeeds, of course.

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Exactly!!! This is what I finally found out. –  Prab May 15 '10 at 11:13

:) Let me modify this program like this:

#include <stdio.h> 

int arr[100]; 
int count=0; 
int max=100; 


int main(){ 
 int i, input; 
 printf("Enter integer values one by one, -1 to quit.\n"); 
 for(i=0;i<max;i++){ 
  scanf("%d",&input); 
  arr[i]=input; 
  if(input==-1)break; 
  count++; 
 } 
 printf("You entered %d values.\n",count); 
 return 0; 
}

You can't use a numeric var to get a char value. If you change it just like this, it will work. :)

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Do format your code in the future please :) –  Goz May 15 '10 at 10:53

scanf will return 0 in your code when the input character does not match the conversion specification. But, the next call to scanf will resume searching immediately after the last converted character. Therefore, you can try the below code:

#include <stdio.h>

int arr[100];
int count=0;
int max=100;


int main(){
   int i, input, ret;
   char end; 
   printf("Enter integer values one by one, q to quit.\n");
   for(i=0;i<max;i++)
   {
      ret = scanf("%d",&input);
      if (!ret)
      {
         scanf("%c", &end);
         if ( end == 'q')
            break;
         else
           continue;
      }
      arr[i]=input;
      count++;
   }
   printf("You entered %d values.\n",count);
   return 0;
}

By doing this, you can make sure that control does not come out of the loop unless you enter q and only legitimate values are copied to the array.

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you exit the program by typing the ascii value for 'q' not q/

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  bitmask Aug 23 '12 at 17:18

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