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I have two servlets: LoginServlet and MailServlet. LoginServlet queries a mysql table using jdbc to get a string(eMail). What I want is to forward this string to MailServlet which in turn will send an email to that e-mail ID sent by LoginServlet.

My question is how do I call and send the variable eMail to MailServlet, from LoginServlet? I thought of creating an instance of the MailServlet as :

MailServlet servlet = new MailServlet();

And then use the servlet object to call the function doGet() in MailServlet. But I am feeling that there is some error in this as this is not the right way to call a servlet. So how do I call and pass a variable to MailServlet?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The purpose of a servlet is to respond to an HTTP request. What you should do is refactor your code so that the logic you want is separated from the other servlet and you can reuse it independently. So, for example, you might end up with a Mailman class, and a MailServlet that uses Mailman to do its work. It doesn't make sense to call a servlet from another servlet.

If what you need is to go to a different page after you hit the first one, use a redirect:

http://www.java-tips.org/java-ee-tips/java-servlet/how-to-redirect-a-request-using-servlet.html

Edit:

For example, suppose you have a servlet like:

public class MailServlet extends HttpServlet {
    public  void doPost(HttpServletRequest request,HttpServletResponse response)
                                  throws ServletException, IOException {
        PrintWriter out=response.getWriter();
        response.setContentType("text/html");

        Message message =new MimeMessage(session1);

        message.setFrom(new InternetAddress("someone@something.com"));
        message.setRecipients(...);
        message.doSomeOtherStuff();
        Transport.send(message);

        out.println("mail has been sent");
    }
}

Instead, do something like this:

public class MailServlet extends HttpServlet {
    public  void doPost(HttpServletRequest request,HttpServletResponse response)
                                  throws ServletException, IOException {
        PrintWriter out=response.getWriter();
        response.setContentType("text/html");

        new Mailer().sendMessage("someone@something.com", ...);

        out.println("mail has been sent");
    }
}

public class Mailer {
    public void sendMessage(String from, ...) {
        Message message =new MimeMessage(session1);
        message.setFrom(new InternetAddress("someone@something.com"));
        message.setRecipients(...);
        message.doSomeOtherStuff();
        Transport.send(message);
    }
}
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1  
Your point is good, but I'd rather end up with a LoginServlet and a Mailer. The whole MailServlet is unnecessary. –  BalusC May 15 '10 at 15:33
    
My project involves applets as the front end and servlets as the back end. Since MailServlet needs an e-mail ID, LoginServlet provides it. Hence the need for inter servlet communication. –  mithun1538 May 15 '10 at 15:35
    
I agree - you probably don't need a MailServlet. You should have a LoginServlet, and then a servlet for the page that the user would go to when they log in. The mailing can be done behind-the-scenes by one of the other servlets. The only reason you would want a MailServlet would be if the user has to go to a particular screen to configure their mail preferences, or set up a mail to be sent out. It makes sense to have a servlet-based architecture, but that doesn't mean every operation needs its own servlet. –  RMorrisey May 15 '10 at 15:37
1  
@mithun: a servlet is only useful if you'd like to control/preprocess/postprocess a HTTP request. In a basic flattened JSP/Servlet setup you should think of just one servlet per JSP page. You have a login JSP. So you need a LoginServlet. You don't have a mail JSP. So you don't need a MailServlet. Just make it a normal Java class. E.g. Mail mail = new Mail(from, to, subject, message); Mailer mailer = new Mailer(); mailer.send(mail); or so. –  BalusC May 15 '10 at 15:40
    
In any case, if you really need to go from one servlet to another, a redirect is the way to accomplish that. –  RMorrisey May 15 '10 at 15:40

I think this may be what you were originally looking for: a request dispatcher. From the Sun examples documentation:

public class Dispatcher extends HttpServlet {
   public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, 
         HttpServletResponse response) {
      request.setAttribute("selectedScreen",
         request.getServletPath());
      RequestDispatcher dispatcher =
         request.getRequestDispatcher("/template.jsp");
      if (dispatcher != null)
         dispatcher.forward(request, response);
   }
   public void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, 
            HttpServletResponse response) {
      request.setAttribute("selectedScreen",
         request.getServletPath());
      RequestDispatcher dispatcher =
         request.getRequestDispatcher("/template.jsp");
      if (dispatcher != null)
         dispatcher.forward(request, response);
   }
}

This appears to specify a new URL, for a different servlet, JSP, or other resource in the same container, to generate the response instead of the current servlet.

From the tutorial here: http://java.sun.com/j2ee/tutorial/1_3-fcs/doc/JSPTags6.html

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This seems way above my understanding, cause I am not that well versed with servlets. Anyway, your first answer solved the problem. Not quite the answer I was expecting, but it did the trick anyway. –  mithun1538 May 18 '10 at 8:17

You can use forward() method of

RequestDispatcher

So the code goes as follows:

LoginServlet.java

protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException 
{
    response.setContentType("text/html");
    PrintWriter pw = response.getWriter();
            String emailID = "abc@abc.com"; //Write code to retrieve email id from MySql and store in emailID variable
    request.setAttribute("emaiID", emailID);
    RequestDispatcher rd = request.getRequestDispatcher("MailServlet");
    rd.forward(request, response);
}

MailServlet.java

protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException 
{
    response.setContentType("text/html");
    PrintWriter pw = response.getWriter();
    String value = (String) request.getAttribute("emaiID");
    pw.println("The value of email id is: " + value);
}

Let me know if this answer is not clear to you.

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