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There are a lot of impressive Boost libraries such as Boost.Lambda or Boost.Phoenix which go a long way towards making C++ into a truly functional language. But is there a straightforward way to create a composite function from any 2 or more arbitrary functions or functors?

If I have: int f(int x) and int g(int x), I want to do something like f . g which would statically generate a new function object equivalent to f(g(x)).

This seems to be possible through various techniques, such as those discussed here. Certainly, you can chain calls to boost::lambda::bind to create a composite functor. But is there anything in Boost which easily allows you to take any 2 or more functions or function objects and combine them to create a single composite functor, similar to how you would do it in a language like Haskell?

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You can use boost::bind instead of boost::lambda::bind for this task. It looks like bind(g, bind(f, _1)). Do you know of that? –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 15 '10 at 20:49
    
Yes, you can use nested calls to boost::bind to create composite functors. However, I was wondering if there was some better way to do it. –  Channel72 May 15 '10 at 20:57
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't know of anything that supports the syntax you wish for currently. However, it would be a simple matter to create one. Simply override * for functors (boost::function<> for example) so that it returns a composite functor.


template < typename R1, typename R2, typename T1, typename T2 >
boost::function<R1(T2)> operator * (boost::function<R1(T2)> const& f, boost::function<R2(T2)> const& g)
{
  return boost::bind(f, boost::bind(g, _1));
}

Untested, but I suspect it's close if it doesn't work out of the box.

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Since raw functions are neither classes nor enumerations, a use like f1 * f2 will not look for overloaded operators, though :( Will use the builtin operator and fail since it can't multiply two functions. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 15 '10 at 23:41
    
That's the issue of having functions as second-class citizens... –  Matthieu M. May 16 '10 at 12:34
    
Yeah, only works with functors. You could make a utility function that casts to a boost::function to match regular functions. –  Crazy Eddie May 16 '10 at 19:21
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To anyone stumbling onto this page, there's a great blog post on this subject from bureau14:

http://blogea.bureau14.fr/index.php/2012/11/function-composition-in-c11/

This takes advantage of the new features in C++ 11 as well as using boost.

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Stumbling upon this question, I'd like to point out to anyone who comes across this today that this is possible with a relatively elegant syntax using just the standard library and a few helper classes thanks to decltype, auto, and perfect forwarding.

Defining these two classes:

template <class Arg, class ArgCall, class OuterCall>
class pipe {
private:
    ArgCall argcall;
    OuterCall outercall;
public:
    typedef pipe<Arg, ArgCall, OuterCall>  this_type;
    pipe(ArgCall ac, OuterCall oc) : argcall(ac), outercall(oc) {}
    auto operator()(Arg arg) -> decltype(outercall(argcall(arg))) {
        return outercall(argcall(arg));
    }
    template <class NewCall>
    pipe<Arg, this_type, NewCall> operator[](NewCall&& nc) {
        return {*this, std::forward<NewCall>(nc)};
    }
};

template <class Arg>
class pipe_source {
public:
    typedef pipe_source<Arg> this_type;
    Arg operator()(Arg arg) {
        return arg;
    }
    template <class ArgCall, class OuterCall>
    static pipe<Arg, ArgCall, OuterCall> create(ArgCall&& ac, OuterCall&& oc) {
        return {std::forward<ArgCall>(ac), std::forward<OuterCall>(oc)};
    }
    template <class OuterCall>
    pipe<Arg, this_type, OuterCall> operator[](OuterCall&& oc) {
        return {*this, std::forward<OuterCall>(oc)};
    }
};

A simple program:

int f(int x) {
        return x*x;
}

int g(int x) {
        return x-2;
}

int h(int x) {
        return x/2;
}

int main() {
        auto foo = pipe_source<int>::create(f, g);
        //or:
        auto bar = pipe_source<int>()[g][h];
        std::cout << foo(10) << std::endl;
        std::cout << bar(10) << std::endl;
        return 0;
}

This has the added benefit that once it's in a pipe, as long as the return type is correct you can add another function f to the chain with pipe[f].

Then:

$ g++ test.cpp -o test -std=c++11
$ ./test
98
4
$
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Template them.

template<typename T1> class FunctorOne {
    FunctorOne(T1 newt)
        : t(newt) {}
    void operator()() {
        t();
    }
    T1 t;
};
template<> class FunctorOne<void> {
    void operator()() {
    }
};
template<typename T1> class FunctorTwo {
    FunctorOne(T1 newt)
        : t(newt) {}
    void operator()() {
        t();
    }
    T1 t;
};
template<> class FunctorTwo<void> {
    void operator()() {
    }
};
FunctorOne<FunctorTwo<FunctorOne<FunctorTwo<void>>>>> strangefunctionobject(FunctorTwo(FunctorOne(FunctorTwo()));

Excellent use of typedefs is recommended.
Edit: Whoops. Turns out that type inference in constructors sucks. I'll get back in a minute with something that actually works :P
Even more edit:
If you wanted just functors rather than functionoids, you could just create a new instance, or even just use static functions.

template<typename T1, typename T2> class FunctorOne {
public:
    static bool Call() {
        T1::Call(T2::Call());
        return true;
    }
};
template<> class FunctorOne<void, void> {
public:
    static bool Call() {
    }
};
template<typename T1> class FunctorTwo {
public:
    static bool Call() {
        T1::Call();
    }
};
template<> class FunctorTwo<void> {
public:
    static bool Call() {
    }
};

bool haicakes = FunctorOne<FunctorTwo<void>, FunctorTwo<void>>::Call();

This assumes that in any given function, you can handle each different signature somewhat manually. Use of decltype could help in this regard with a C++0x compiler.

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