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the program for strtok given on http://www.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/functions/strtok.html crashes everytime..

#include <string.h>
...
char *token;
char *line = "LINE TO BE SEPARATED";
char *search = " ";


/* Token will point to "LINE". */
token = strtok(line, search);


/* Token will point to "TO". */
token = strtok(NULL, search);

If I use a char array for variable 'line', it works. i.e. char line[] = "LINE TO BE SEPARATED" works.

Kindly explain.

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1  
Why does this have a C++ tag? It's pure C code. <string.h> and ::strtok() don't even exist in C++. (It's <cstring> and std::strtok().) If you want to do this in C++, use std::string and streams (or any library providing tokenization). –  sbi May 16 '10 at 10:33
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

strtok modifies the input string line.

char *line = "LINE TO BE SEPARATED";

In this case line points to the read-only memory. Hence, cannot be modified. You need to pass char array for strtok.

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Why doesn't C force const char* for this type of initialization? Also note char line[] = "LINE TO BE SEPARATED"; works fine. –  NateS Mar 28 '13 at 14:17
1  
@NateS char line[] is a modifiable array that is just initialized to contain the string initially, that's why it works. –  Arkku Mar 28 '13 at 14:47
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Since this has a C++ tag:

// Beware, brain-compiled code ahead!
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::istringstream iss("LINE TO BE SEPARATED");
  while( iss.good() ) {
    std::string token;
    iss >> token;
    std::cout << token '\n';
  }

  return 0;
}

Edit: As Konrad said in his comment, the above loop could be replaced by std::copy working on stream iterators:

// Beware, brain-compiled code ahead!
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
  std::istringstream iss("LINE TO BE SEPARATED");
  std::copy( std::istream_iterator<string>(std::iss)
           , std::istream_iterator<string>()
           , std::ostream_iterator<string>(std::cout, "\n") );
  return 0;
}

I have to (grudgingly) admit that there's something to be said for it.

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I smell a std::copy here … ;-) –  Konrad Rudolph May 16 '10 at 10:43
    
add #include <iostream> and replace the '\n' with << std::endl –  James Morris May 16 '10 at 10:45
    
@Konrad: I can kind of guess what you're hinting at, but this std::copy idiom just never really appealed to me. –  sbi May 16 '10 at 11:17
    
@James: I added the <iostream>, but I don't see a reason to flush std::cout's buffer for every token, so I left it at '\n'. –  sbi May 16 '10 at 11:18
1  
@Konrad: I hadn't claimed my dislike to be rational. :) –  sbi May 17 '10 at 11:19
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char *line is a pointer and you are pointing it to a constant string ("LINE TO BE SEPARATED"). This fails when strtok attempts to modify that string. It would be better to qualify this variable as const char *line—still wouldn't work, but might lead to a helpful warning when you try to pass it to strtok.

Meanwhile the array char line[] can be modified (it's not const) and is only initialised to contain the string.

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aJ said what is needed. My advice is avoid that ugly & unsafe strtok. You are using C++ so go ahead with std::string. You also can use Boost http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/libs/libraries.htm#String & http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/doc/html/string_algo.html . If you want a new string class, you may look at http://bstring.sourceforge.net/ .

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