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I am interested in a way how to read GPU temperature (graphics processing unit, main chip of graphic card), by using some video card driver API?

Everyone knows that there two different chip manufacturers (popular ones, at least) - ATI and nVIDIA - so there are two different kinds of drivers to read temperature from. I'm interested in learning how to do it for each different card driver.

Language in question is irrelevant - it could be C/C++, .NET platform, Java, but let's say that .NET is preferred.

Anyone been doing this before?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For nVidia you would use nvcpl.dll.

Here's the documentation:
http://developer.download.nvidia.com/SDK/9.5/Samples/DEMOS/common/src/NvCpl/docs/NVControlPanel_API.pdf

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Although this is a partial answer to my question (as stated in answer, covers only nVidia), I'll mark it as answer. See below for my own ATI-related findings. –  mr.b May 19 '10 at 22:40

I found this: AMD Display Library SDK (ADL for short). That covers ATI cards.

http://developer.amd.com/gpu/adlsdk/Pages/default.aspx

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I recommend using GPUZ. You can use this small tool to get the temperature along with all the information about your gpu: http://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/

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I have that little utility installed on my computer, but I was looking for a way to make something similar on my own. –  mr.b May 16 '10 at 21:19
    
Ohh sorry. I guess i'm gonna delete my post. Unless you think of disassembling the GPUZ program and try to figure out how they got the temperature in that program. ;) –  Nick May 17 '10 at 15:54
    
That idea crossed my mind, yes :) You are free to leave it here, don't have to delete it. –  mr.b May 17 '10 at 16:59

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