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What purpose does it serve ?

Just read an example in a book where the author has done so.

int numOfGuesses=0;
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Also see: stackoverflow.com/questions/2843115/… –  Arkku May 16 '10 at 11:01
3  
@happysoul: in addition to the great answers you got, it makes your intent clear. When you're using a good IDE, that supports "programming by intention", you'll get notifications in real-time (even on a partial non-compilable source/AST) telling you "numOfGuesses might not have been initialized". I've been programming since more than a quarter of a century and such notifications are HUGE TIME SAVERS. Because more often than not it's a plain error to rely on the 'default' value: did you really meant to use the default value, or did you plan (and forgot) to assign it before using it? –  SyntaxT3rr0r May 16 '10 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The automatic assignment to zero only applies to members, not to local variables. If it is a local variable and the = 0 is omitted then that variable has no value, not even zero. Attempting to use the value before it is assigned will result in a compile error. For example this code attempts to use an uninitialized local variable:

public class Program
{   
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int numOfGuesses;   // local variable
        System.out.println(numOfGuesses);
    }
}

and produces this compile error:

Program.java:6: variable numOfGuesses might not have been initialized
        System.out.println(numOfGuesses);

Whereas this code using a member works and outputs zero:

public class Program
{   
    int numOfGuesses; // member variable

    public void run()
    {
        System.out.println(numOfGuesses);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        new Program().run();
    }
}

For members I tend to assign to zero explicilty if my code uses the fact that the initial zalue is zero, and omit the assignment if my code doesn't use the initial value (for example if it the value is assigned in the constructor or elsewhere). The result is the same either way, so it's just a style issue.

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Do local variables not get assigned default values ? I mean an int type local variable too is an int only. I am confused..why is that ? –  Serenity May 16 '10 at 11:00
    
@happysoul: That is correct. You can try it for yourself. I'll post a code example soon... just typing it now... –  Mark Byers May 16 '10 at 11:01
    
cool..thanks :) I just wanna know why is that so. –  Serenity May 16 '10 at 11:02
    
guess i need to read about the diff between local and member variables..I am still wondering why won't it assign it 0 to a local variable –  Serenity May 16 '10 at 11:06
    
So I am guessing it's a rule in Java that local variables don't get assigned default values. –  Serenity May 16 '10 at 11:09

It's more explicit; some people like. Note that this applies only to fields -- local variables need to be initialized; there are no defaults.

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The Java compilation and runtime differ.

When running the program, all classes are loaded with class loaders and they do the following:

This is done when class is used for the first time. Their execute order is defined by their order in the code.

  • run static blocks

    static{
    //do something here
    }
    
  • initialize static variables

    public static int number;

This will be initialized to zero 0;


The next group of initializations done is when creating an object.Their execute order is defined by their order in the code.

  • run non-static block

    {
    // do something here 
    }
    
  • initialize non-static(instance) variables

    public int instance_number;


And this is when and why there is default initialization! This is not true for methods because they don't have similar mechanism as classes. So basically this means that you will have to initialize EXPLICITLY each method variable.enter code here

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