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#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
unsigned long long int num = 285212672; //FYI: fits in 29 bits
int normalInt = 5;
printf("My number is %d bytes wide and its value is %ul. A normal number is %d.\n", sizeof(num), num, normalInt);
return 0;
}

Output:

My number is 8 bytes wide and its value is 285212672l. A normal number is 0.

I assume this unexpected result is from printing the unsigned long long int. How do you printf an unsigned long long int?

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I just compiled your code ( with %llu ) with gcc and the output was the correct one. Are you passing any options to the compiler? –  Juan Aug 7 '08 at 23:13
    
Note that samsung bada's newlib seems not to support "%lld" : developer.bada.com/forum/… –  rzr Oct 7 '10 at 10:42
1  
    
I would suggest using using stdint.h and being explicit about the number of bits in your variable. We're still in a period of transition between 32 and 64 bit architectures, and "unsigned long long int" doesn't mean the same thing on both. –  BD at Rivenhill May 13 '11 at 22:19
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8 Answers

Use the ll (el-el) long-long modifier with the u (unsigned) conversion. (Works in windows, GNU).

printf("%llu", 285212672);
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7  
Doesn't work on Windows - this is for Linux/UNIX only. –  Paul Hargreaves Sep 9 '08 at 18:17
4  
Or to be precise it's for GNU libc, and doesn't work with Microsoft's C runtime. –  Mark Baker Oct 8 '08 at 9:35
60  
This isn't a Linux/UNIX thing, the "ll" length modifier was added to Standard C in C99, if it doesn't work in "Microsoft C" then it is because they are not standards compliant. –  Robert Gamble Oct 17 '08 at 4:46
5  
I am using Visual C++ 2005 and it works fine –  JProgrammer Jun 12 '09 at 3:10
6  
Works for me in VS2008. Moreover, as far as I remember the MS C Compiler (when set up to compile straight C) is supposed to be C90 compliant by design; C99 introduced some things that not everyone liked. –  benmatth Oct 11 '09 at 20:57
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You may want to try using the inttypes.h library that gives you types such as int32_t, int64_t, uint64_t etc. You can then use its macros such as:

uint64_t x;
uint32_t y;

printf("x: %"PRId64", y: %"PRId32"\n", x, y);

This is "guaranteed" to not give you the same trouble as long, unsigned long long etc, since you don't have to guess how many bits are in each data type.

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where these PRId64, PRId32 macros defined? –  happy_marmoset Dec 12 '13 at 12:31
    
@happy_marmoset: they are defined in inttypes.h –  Nathan Fellman Dec 12 '13 at 14:49
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For long long (or __int64) using MSVS, you should use %I64d:

__int64 a;
time_t b;
...
fprintf(outFile,"%I64d,%I64d\n",a,b);    //I is capital i
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This also works: %I64x –  vt. Feb 25 at 17:49
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That is because %llu doesn't work properly under Windows and %d can't handle 64 bit integers. I suggest using PRIu64 instead and you'll find it's portable to Linux as well.

Try this instead:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

int main() {
    unsigned long long int num = 285212672; //FYI: fits in 29 bits
    int normalInt = 5;
    /* NOTE: PRIu64 is a preprocessor macro and thus should go outside the quoted string. */
    printf("My number is %d bytes wide and its value is %"PRIu64". A normal number is %d.\n", sizeof(num), num, normalInt);
    return 0;
}

Output

My number is 8 bytes wide and its value is 285212672. A normal number is 5.
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+1 for the reference to PRIu64, which I had never seen, but this doesn't seem portable to 64 bit Linux (at least) because PRIu64 expands to "lu" instead of "llu". –  BD at Rivenhill May 13 '11 at 22:15
5  
And why would that be bad? A long is a 64 bit value on 64 bit Linux, as on every other OS except for Windows. –  Ringding Mar 4 '12 at 15:06
    
@BDatRivenhill Linux/Unix uses LP64 in which long is 64 bits –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc 2 days ago
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Compile it as x64 with VS2005:

%llu works well.

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Non-standard things are always strange :)

for the long long portion under GNU it's L, ll or q

and under windows I believe it's ll only

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In Linux it is %llu and in Windows it is %I64u

Although I have found it doesn't work in Windows 2000, there seems to be a bug there!

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with windows, (or at least, with the microsoft C compiler for windows) there's also %I64d, %I32u, and %I32d –  JustJeff Sep 6 '09 at 14:55
1  
What does it have to do with Windows 2000? The C library is the one that handles printf. –  CMircea May 8 '10 at 18:00
    
Just what I observed. I wrote an app which used this construct and it worked perfectly on WinXP but spat garbage on Win2k. Maybe it's something to do with a system call that the C library is making to the kernel, maybe it's something to do with Unicode, who knows. I remember having to work around it using _i64tot() or something like that. –  Adam Pierce May 11 '10 at 6:21
    
Sounds like MS exercising its "freedom to innovate" again... ;-) –  Dronz Nov 12 '12 at 6:20
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Well, one way is to compile it as x64 with VS2008

This runs as you would expect:

int normalInt = 5; 
unsigned long long int num=285212672;
printf(
    "My number is %d bytes wide and its value is %ul. 
    A normal number is %d \n", 
    sizeof(num), 
    num, 
    normalInt);

For 32 bit code, we need to use the correct __int64 format specifier %I64u. So it becomes.

int normalInt = 5; 
unsigned __int64 num=285212672;
printf(
    "My number is %d bytes wide and its value is %I64u. 
    A normal number is %d", 
    sizeof(num),
    num, normalInt);

This code works for both 32 and 64 bit VS compiler.

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