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Since I would like to participate in an open source project I would like to know a couple of things:

  1. How do you apply to one?
  2. How do open source projects know that I am good in what I do?
  3. How do you find a good open source project from which I can learn?
  4. How open source projects are managed?
  5. How to know if the project is alive?

Regards,

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Pick an area that you are passionate about. –  Srikar Doddi May 16 '10 at 16:15
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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

How do you apply to one?

Normally you don't apply in any formal sense. Ask the project owners or on their internal mailing lists where help is needed. Start implementing a new feature or fix some bugs. If you contribute good work it's a matter of time they'll ask you to officially join the project team.

How do open source projects know that I am good in what I do?

By looking at your contributions. Good project leaders won't appoint team members before they have contributed something to the project.

How do you find a good open source project from which I can learn?

Simply browse around the major open source hosting sites. Maybe concentrate on the "meta-hosting" sites like Ohloh. The DVCS communities for git (github.com) and mercurial (bitbucket.org) have great hosting platforms that become more and more popular among OSS projects. I do strongly suggest having a look into both, DVCS ecnourages the typical OSS project workflow so much more, you will find it easier to simply start working on something and getting your code reviewed/merged into the mainline.

How open source projects are managed?

Usually there's a project owner/founder and a crew of committers, sometimes with different responsibilities. Well run projects have public/internal wikis and mailing lists. Those are the basics and both are good starting points for you. You'll find there are a lot of differences between small and large projects of course.

How to know if the project is alive?

Simply check the public code repository for the latest commits. Again, meta-sites like Ohloh analyze such things automatically and can give you a good impression of what's going on.

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How do you apply to one?

You don't. You start submitting patches or improvements or docs or whatever to the project.

How do open source projects know that I am good in what I do?

They look at the quality of your patches, docs or whatever.

How do you find a good open source project from which I can learn?

You don't - you find an open source project you are interested in. FOSS projects are probably not agreat way of learning to program.

How open source projects are managed?

As an anarchist collective, usually.

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How do you apply to one?

You don't -- you just write code and contribute patches.

How do open source projects know that I am good in what I do?

By doing. If you write good code and your patches are useful, the maintainers will recognize that you're skilled.

How do you find a good open source project from which I can learn?

There are some high-profile ones you could check out, but I think the best way is to contribute to software that you actually use on a regular basis.

How open source projects are managed?

It depends. Most of them have a mailing list. Most also have a development page (like a Trac site) for tracking project progress and milestones. As for management, most have a lead developer that's the final arbiter of development-related decisions.

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i think the best way to get started on open source projects is to write small patches and send them to the project maintainers. this way they see you are interested in their project, know some of the codebase already and they see how well you can code.

another way is to start your own small open source project, and host it on sourceforge or github

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  1. just ask its authors
  2. they'll ask you to do something, if you do it and it works, it will go on
  3. search something that arouses your interest, both regarding its language and its aim
  4. a pack of male penguins getting drunk on an ice platform
  5. look at the last release version, and look at the activity in the dev mailing list / forum / whatever
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I'm afraid to ask you about non-open-source project management now. –  Xavier Ho May 16 '10 at 15:14
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It's the same, but without the platform, and the sea is not made of water... –  soru Jul 25 '10 at 20:44
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Another good approach is to look at the "help wanted" listings of projects looking for more developers such as the one on CodePlex: http://www.codeplex.com/site/search/openings

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  1. To be one, ask one ... means: Just contact the guys there
  2. Prove your skills, e.g. showing them a demo project of yours or giving intelligent anwers in forums
  3. There are millions ... depends on what language you want to learn. For Java I'd suggest Eclipse
  4. Mainly using versioning controls like subversion, git etc...

cheers

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  1. Just ask (suscribe to mailing-lists for example).
  2. Most of the times, you will first report bugs and submit patches before gaining trust and getting a real committer access. For short, you have to show people you want to help. This is not a matter of skill to me, in a project there are things to do for everyone.
  3. It is your choice ! Don't do this just to say "I'm in an open-source project".
  4. Every project is different... But generally it is bug tracker/mailing-lists...
  5. Look at the sources/bug tracker.
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