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I read recently about memory barrier and the reordaring issue and now I have some confusion about it.

Let us have a following senario:

private object _object1 = null;

private object _object2 = null;

private bool _usingObject1 = false;

private object MyObject
{
    get 
    {
        if (_usingObject1)
        {
            return _object1;
        }
        else
        {
            return _object2;
        }
    }
    set 
    {
        if (_usingObject1)
        {
           _object1 = value;
        }
        else
        {
           _object2 = value;
        }
    }
}

private void Update()
{
    _usingMethod1 = true;
    SomeProperty = FooMethod();
    //..
    _usingMethod1 = false;
}

1- At Update method; is it always _usingMethod1 = true statement excecuted before getting or setting the property? or due reordaring issue we can not garantee that?

2- Should we use volitle like.

private volitle bool _usingMethod1 = false;

3- If we use lock; can we garantee then every statement within the lock will be excecuted in order like:

private void FooMethod()
{
    object locker = new object();
    lock (locker)
    {
        x = 1;
        y = a;
        i++;
    }
}

Thanks in advanced..

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The subject of memory barriers is quite complex. It even trips up the experts from time to time. When we talk about a memory barrier we are really combining two different ideas.

  • Acquire fence: A memory barrier in which other reads & writes are not allowed to move before the fence.
  • Release fence: A memory barrier in which other reads & writes are not allowed to move after the fence.

A memory barrier that creates only one of two is sometimes called a half-fence. A memory barrier that creates both is sometimes called a full-fence.

The volatile keyword creates half-fences. Reads of volatile fields have acquire semantics while writes have release semantics. That means no instruction can be moved before a read or after a write.

The lock keyword creates full-fences on both boundaries (entry and exit). That means no instruction can be moved either before or after each boundary.

However, all of this moot if we are only concerned with one thread. Ordering, as it is perceived by that thread, is always preserved. In fact, without that fundamental guarentee no program would ever work right. The real issue is with how other threads perceive reads and writes. That is where you need to be concerned.

So to answer your questions:

  1. From a single thread's perspective...yes. From another thread's perspective...no.

  2. It depends. That might work, but I need to have better understanding of what you are trying to acheive.

  3. From another thread's perspective...no. The reads and writes are free to move around within the boundaries of the lock. They just cannot move outside those boundaries. That is why it is important for other threads to also create memory barriers.

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Thanks for the information, It really helps me understanding the concept more.. What I need to achive is to make sure the "_usingMethod1 = true" instruction will alwayes done before the next instruction SomeProperty = FooMethod(); In multithread senario how to acomplish that? is by: _usingMethod1 = true; Thread.MemoryBarrier(); SomeProperty = FooMethod(); or lock for full fences so no reordaring: lock (locker) { _usingMethod1= true; } SomeProperty = FooMethod(); or maybe just by making the _usingMethod1 a volatile variable. Thanks for your help. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd May 17 '10 at 8:59
1  
I would wrap the entire contents of the Update method in a lock. In addition to the memory barriers it also guarentees atomicity, which is equally important. Besides, these lock-free idioms (via volatile, Thread.MemoryBarrier, etc.) are incredibly difficult to get right. –  Brian Gideon May 17 '10 at 13:25

The volatile keyword doesn't accomplish anything here. It has very weak guarantees, it does not imply a memory barrier. Your code doesn't show another thread getting created so it is hard to guess if locking is required. It is however a hard requirement if two threads can execute Update() at the same time and use the same object.

Beware that your lock code as posted doesn't lock anything. Each thread would have its own instance of the "locker" object. You have to make it a private field of your class, created by the constructor or an initializer. Thus:

private object locker = new object();

private void Update()
{
    lock (locker)
    {
        _usingMethod1 = true;
        SomeProperty = FooMethod();
        //..
        _usingMethod1 = false;
    }
}

Note that there will also be a race on the SomeProperty assignment.

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The volatile has a memory barrier; and so I asked if that momory barrier with it will suppress the reordaring so the _usingMethod1 = true will always garanteed to excute before getting or setting the property SomeProperty, I provide a lock just for memorry barrier not for syncronization issue with other threads and so I make it a local variable within method in purpose because I was asking if it will avoid the reordaring of instructions inside the lock. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd May 17 '10 at 8:31
    
A single thread always has a consistent view of the variables it uses. Programs could not work if that wasn't the case. –  Hans Passant May 17 '10 at 10:20

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