Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What will day to day C++ development be like in a few years? What C++0x features will change C++ development the most?

In what order should I concentrate learning these new features?

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by gbjbaanb, Esoteric Screen Name, Dmitry Dovgopoly, Tadeusz Kopec, Evil Closet Monkey Oct 14 '13 at 16:39

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

23  
Perhaps you should add a crystal-ball tag? –  Oded May 16 '10 at 16:57
1  
@avakar: you are under the wrong impression that making a question CW has any impact on whether it should be closed or not. –  Andreas Bonini May 16 '10 at 17:04
3  
This can increase knowledge of new features and their real-life usefulness. Therefore should be CW but is a valid topic. –  John May 16 '10 at 17:26
1  
@Andreas Bonini, "and I'm sure it will be closed again fairly soon, and then reopened, and so on", apparently not. –  avakar May 16 '10 at 18:16
3  
We honestly have a [the-future] tag? –  Dario May 16 '10 at 20:05
show 11 more comments

12 Answers 12

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Lambdas, because they finally introduce reasonable means of harnessing the benefits of functional programming.

share|improve this answer
9  
And because they demonstrate the sad result of stuffing fashionable features into 30 years old language. –  ima May 16 '10 at 18:05
3  
Switching C++ from "lasting value" category to "trying, but can't keep up" –  ima May 16 '10 at 18:05
9  
<irony>Stuffing fashionable features into 80 years old languages has given us Haskell and F#</irony> –  Dario May 16 '10 at 18:14
6  
Maybe it just shows something about the seriousness of this discussion. Admittedly, the C++0x's lambda syntax is weird - as is Python's, Lua's, VB.NET's - , but that has not been questioned. We aren't talking about the motivation of their introduction or the principles of programming language evolution (to which most/all (modern) languages are subject), but their usefulness for future C++ programming. And they are useful, mainly because they finally provide us with functionality that lay in the nature of C++ (see how functional the STL is built) but couldn't be replicated sufficiently. –  Dario May 16 '10 at 19:49
9  
@ima: so you're saying that because of a slightly quirky syntax (which adds expressiveness by allowing you to choose whether to capture by value or reference), we're all doomed, C++ takes a big step backwards and the world is going to end? Can't say I agree. I fail to see how "C++ with lambdas and a non-ideal syntax" can possibly be worse than "C++ without lambdas, but which already had a non-ideal syntax for every other feature in the language" Seriously, complaining about syntax in a discussion of C++? What's the point? C++ wasn't exactly an example of syntactic clarity to begin with –  jalf May 17 '10 at 14:59
show 4 more comments

I personaly think that move semantics (and rvalue references in general) are the most important change, on par with threads/locks/atomics. Everything else is, more or less, simplification of syntax or standardization of common third-party solutions -- we can write functors when we need lambdas and we have numerous regex libraries. Even for the lack of atomic operations there were some solutions, but there were NO move constructors/move assignment operators.

Being able to move objects changes the whole perception of the language to me. Even though we had RVO and the swap-to-temporary trick to emulate some of it already, it's hard to imagine how the life changes when this is part of everyday life. It's not just ofstream("log.txt") << "Hi!";, or the so much faster STL algorithms, it's a whole new way of passing data between functions.

share|improve this answer
7  
And a whole new generation of programmers having no clue, what they/others are doing and why it doesn't work. –  tstenner May 16 '10 at 19:10
6  
+1 - rvalue references allow a whole slew of important constructs and methods that were previously impossible. –  Crazy Eddie May 16 '10 at 20:17
4  
unique_ptr is very nice too - move semantics pointer ownership. –  AshleysBrain May 16 '10 at 20:54
    
You are right that move semantics is a really good feature, but Boost.Move provides a good even if incomplete emulation of C++ move semantics. Note the library is just now under review. –  Vicente Botet Escriba May 16 '10 at 23:07
    
pass-by-value ought to get more popular again. :) –  sellibitze May 16 '10 at 23:11
add comment

auto because people will overuse it.

share|improve this answer
14  
Exactly what I'm looking for when I need to declare a loop using iterators.. ahh.. no longer having to constantly type std::vector<std::basic_string<TCHAR> >::const_iterator every time I want to loop through a vector of strings. –  Billy ONeal May 16 '10 at 17:45
6  
@Idan K: The problem is more having to typedef every and each STL container you want to iterate over. And writing generic code to handle this type is tedious. The auto keyword will remove all that. –  paercebal May 16 '10 at 19:25
6  
“overuse” … well, I don’t know. I certainly intend to use it extensively. Don’t know that that’s “over”using it, though. –  Konrad Rudolph May 16 '10 at 20:03
3  
@paer Absolutely, I prefer auto x = *it over typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type x = *it anyday. –  FredOverflow May 16 '10 at 21:48
2  
@rlbond : My current code is more than full of typedef lines written only for loop iterations, and nothing else. I contemplated the use of a macro #define fordef typedef just for the sake of sick humour. And don't forget the typename as correctly commented by FredOverflow. For these reasons (and for metaprograming reasons, but mostly these reasons), I welcome this addition of the auto keyword. –  paercebal May 16 '10 at 23:04
show 10 more comments

Range-based for-loops.

for (int x: numbers) std::cout << x << " ";

Yay!

share|improve this answer
1  
what is numbers? –  Inverse May 17 '10 at 17:20
    
@Inverse Some range that you can iterator over. For example, an int[] or a std::vector<int>. –  FredOverflow May 17 '10 at 17:33
1  
I assume you can iterate through int[5], but not through int*. But then I also assume you can't iterate through C strings. Will C++ strings at least allow iterating? –  luiscubal May 17 '10 at 21:56
1  
@visitor: Technical reason, no. But design reason, yes. char* is not a string, it is a pointer. Maybe it points to the first character in a null-terminated string, but maybe it points to a single char, like its type suggests. –  Dennis Zickefoose May 18 '10 at 18:50
1  
@GMan Just curious. Since C strings are null-terminated, "abc" is actually const char[4], right? So that means a foreach applied to it would also be applied to the '\0' char, right? –  luiscubal Aug 19 '10 at 11:03
show 8 more comments

Unicode support. No more cobbles and hacks to get correct handling of unicode characters -- now the entire unicode standard is natively supported by the language.

share|improve this answer
1  
yes please! Long overdue. –  jalf May 17 '10 at 15:01
    
indeed very long –  Kugel May 17 '10 at 21:50
add comment

auto, lambdas, and smart pointers.

share|improve this answer
1  
std::auto_ptr is in C++03. –  Billy ONeal May 16 '10 at 17:44
1  
vector<auto_ptr>, however, is not. –  ima May 16 '10 at 18:11
1  
I meant auto key word for type variable compile time detection –  yesraaj May 17 '10 at 6:15
1  
@Billy: Right, std::auto_ptr is getting deprecated. –  visitor May 18 '10 at 11:10
add comment

Standard facilities for threading and synchronization.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Regular expressions as a standard library - you know you need them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Aren't they in boost? –  John May 16 '10 at 17:24
2  
they are in new standard also –  yesraaj May 16 '10 at 17:26
4  
@John boost is not a standard library. –  SoapBox May 16 '10 at 18:48
4  
So what? Moving boost functionality to the standard is not any kind of paradigm shift that will have massive impact, which is what the question was about. –  John May 17 '10 at 8:36
1  
@John: good point, and I agree. Regardless of how awesome regexes are, putting them in the standard library isn't going to have a huge impact because we already had them in boost –  jalf May 17 '10 at 15:02
add comment

We switched to 2010 about a month ago. The two most common things we've used are auto and lambda. Rvalue references have allowed me to do many things that were not possible before, but in day-to-day use they are not AS used as lambda and auto.

share|improve this answer
add comment

this is a great article about new features Explicating the new C++ standard (C++0x), and its implementation in VC10

The auto keyword For automatic data-type deduction (at compile time), depending on initialization.

The decltype keyword For deducing data-type from expression, or an auto variable

The nullptr keyword Null pointer is now promoted, and is been awarded a keyword!

The static_assert keyword For compile time assertions. Useful for templates, and validations that cannot be done using #ifdef.

Lambda Expressions Locally defined functions. Inherits features from function-pointers and class objects (functors).

Trailing Return types Mainly useful when templated function's return type cannot be expressed.

R-value references Move semantics - resource utilization before temporary object gets destroyed.

there are also described new features of Microsoft's new compiler

share|improve this answer
4  
for_each was in C++98 too, but you had to use it with a named function or a function object. –  Turnor May 16 '10 at 17:37
    
So it's not for_each, but the usage of for_each with a lambda, that you're highlighting? –  Mike DeSimone May 16 '10 at 20:33
    
Just to be a stickler, auto's type is determined by initialization, not assignment. –  GManNickG Aug 10 '10 at 18:06
add comment

auto in the for loops, and lambdas for the algorithm, I'll start a massive using of for_each.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Concepts. At last, we'll be able to type-check templates before instantiating them, and when we instantiate them incorrectly, we'll get sensible error messages. Whoops! The C++0X committee couldn't agree and eventually tossed them out. Ah well, wait for C++1X...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.