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I have the following code implementation of Breadth-First search.

trait State{
   def successors:Seq[State]
   def isSuccess:Boolean = false
   def admissableHeuristic:Double
}
def breadthFirstSearch(initial:State):Option[List[State]] = {
   val open= new scala.collection.mutable.Queue[List[State]]
   val closed = new scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[State]
   open.enqueue(initial::Nil)
   while (!open.isEmpty){
      val path:List[State]=open.dequeue()
      if(path.head.isSuccess) return Some(path.reverse)
      closed += path.head
      for (x <- path.head.successors)
        if (!closed.contains(x))
          open.enqueue(x::path)
   }

   return None
}

If I define a subtype of State for my particular problem

class CannibalsState extends State {
 //...
}

What's the best way to make breadthFirstSearch return the same subtype as it was passed?

Supposing I change this so that there are 3 different state classes for my particular problem and they share a common supertype:

abstract class CannibalsState extends State {
 //...
}
class LeftSideOfRiver extends CannibalsState {
 //...
}
class InTransit extends CannibalsState {
 //...
}
class RightSideOfRiver extends CannibalsState {
 //...
}

How can I make the types work out so that breadthFirstSearch infers that the correct return type is CannibalsState when it's passed an instance of LeftSideOfRiver?

Can this be done with an abstract type member, or must it be done with generics?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

One option is to use generics as Randall described. If you want to achieve something similar with an abstract type member, then you can do it like this (based on Mitch's code):

trait ProblemType {

    type S <: State

    trait State {
        def successors: Seq[S]
        def isSuccess: Boolean = false
        def admissableHeuristic: Double
    }

    def breadthFirstSearch(initial: S): Option[List[S]] = {
        val open = new scala.collection.mutable.Queue[List[S]]
        val closed = new scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[S]
        open.enqueue(initial :: Nil)
        while (!open.isEmpty) {
            val path: List[S] = open.dequeue()
            if (path.head.isSuccess) return Some(path.reverse)
            closed += path.head
            for (x <- path.head.successors)
                if (!closed.contains(x))
                    open.enqueue(x :: path)
        }

        return None
    }

}

object RiverCrossingProblem extends ProblemType {

    type S = CannibalsState

    abstract class CannibalsState extends State {
     //...
    }
    class LeftSideOfRiver extends CannibalsState {
     //...
    }
    class InTransit extends CannibalsState {
     //...
    }
    class RightSideOfRiver extends CannibalsState {
     //...
    }

}
share|improve this answer

How about this?

trait State[+S] {
  def successors: Seq[State[S]]
  def isSuccess: Boolean = false
  def admissableHeuristic: Double
}

object BFS
{
  def
  breadthFirstSearch[S <: State[S]](initial: State[S]): Option[List[State[S]]] = {
    val open= new scala.collection.mutable.Queue[List[State[S]]]
    val closed = new scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[State[S]]

    open.enqueue(initial :: Nil)

    while (!open.isEmpty) {
      val path: List[State[S]] = open.dequeue()

      if (path.head.isSuccess)
        return Some(path.reverse)

      closed += path.head
      for (x <- path.head.successors)
        if (!closed.contains(x))
          open.enqueue(x :: path)
    }

    return None
  }
}
share|improve this answer

One approach to this type of problem is to enclose the State trait and the operations that act on it within another trait.

trait ProblemType {

  trait State {
    def successors: Seq[State]
    def isSuccess: Boolean = false
    def admissableHeuristic: Double
  }

  def breadthFirstSearch(initial: State): Option[List[State]] = {
    val open = new scala.collection.mutable.Queue[List[State]]
    val closed = new scala.collection.mutable.HashSet[State]
    open.enqueue(initial :: Nil)
    while (!open.isEmpty) {
      val path: List[State] = open.dequeue()
      if (path.head.isSuccess) return Some(path.reverse)
      closed += path.head
      for (x <- path.head.successors)
        if (!closed.contains(x))
          open.enqueue(x :: path)
    }

    return None
  }

}

Then, you can define your concrete States within an object extending the enclosing trait:

object RiverCrossingProblem extends ProblemType {

  class LeftSideOfRiver extends State {
    // ...
  }

  class InTransit extends State {
    // ...
  }

  class RightSideOfRiver extends State {
    // ...
  }

}
share|improve this answer

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