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How do you get a list of all ModelState error messages? I found this code to get all the keys: ( http://stackoverflow.com/questions/888521/returning-a-list-of-keys-with-modelstate-errors)

var errorKeys = (from item in ModelState
        where item.Value.Errors.Any() 
        select item.Key).ToList();

But how would I get the error messages as a IList or IQueryable?

I could go:

foreach (var key in errorKeys)
{
    string msg = ModelState[error].Errors[0].ErrorMessage;
    errorList.Add(msg);
}

But thats doing it manually - surely there is a way to do it using LINQ? The .ErrorMessage property is so far down the chain that I don't know how to write the LINQ...

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 107 down vote accepted

You can put anything you want to inside the select clause:

var errorList = (from item in ModelState
        where item.Value.Errors.Any() 
        select item.Value.Errors[0].ErrorMessage).ToList();

EDIT: You can extract multiple errors into separate list items by adding a from clause, like this:

var errorList = (from item in ModelState.Values
        from error in item.Errors
        select error.ErrorMessage).ToList();

Or:

var errorList = ModelState.Values.SelectMany(m => m.Errors)
                                 .Select(e => e.ErrorMessage)
                                 .ToList();

2nd EDIT: You're looking for a Dictionary<string, string[]>:

var errorList = ModelState.ToDictionary(
    kvp => kvp.Key,
    kvp => kvp.Value.Errors.Select(e => e.ErrorMessage).ToArray()
);
share|improve this answer
    
Thats a quick reply :)! Hey that looks good, but what if ModelState[item.Key] has more than 1 error? Errors[0] only works for a single error message – JK. May 16 '10 at 23:14
    
How do you want to combine them? – SLaks May 16 '10 at 23:15
    
Thanks thats almost it - but its selecting every key even if it has no errors - how can we filter out the keys with no errors? – JK. May 17 '10 at 1:31
1  
Add .Where(kvp => kvp.Value.Errors.Count > 0) – SLaks May 17 '10 at 1:36

Here is the full implementation with all the pieces put together:

First create an extension method:

public static class ModelStateHelper
{
    public static IEnumerable Errors(this ModelStateDictionary modelState)
    {
        if (!modelState.IsValid)
        {
            return modelState.ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key,
                kvp => kvp.Value.Errors
                                .Select(e => e.ErrorMessage).ToArray())
                                .Where(m => m.Value.Count() > 0);
        }
        return null;
    }
}

Then call that extension method and return the errors from the controller action (if any) as json:

if (!ModelState.IsValid)
{
    return Json(new { Errors = ModelState.Errors() }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}

And then finally, show those errors on the clientside (in jquery.validation style, but can be easily changed to any other style)

function DisplayErrors(errors) {
    for (var i = 0; i < errors.length; i++) {
        $("<label for='" + errors[i].Key + "' class='error'></label>")
        .html(errors[i].Value[0]).appendTo($("input#" + errors[i].Key).parent());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like an interesting method however the helper class isn't working for me. Is this due to changes perhaps with MVC 2? I'm getting an error that the ToDictionary method doesn't exist on modelState. – Cymen Jun 24 '10 at 0:27
    
@Cymen are you forgetting to reference System.Linq? ToDictionary() is a LINQ extension method. – Nathan Taylor Oct 22 '10 at 0:47
    
@Nathan indeed -- I forgot to come back and update. – Cymen Nov 2 '10 at 18:10
4  
Subject to your preferences .Where(m => m.Value.Count() > 0) could also be written as .Where(m => m.Value.Any()). – Manfred Jul 13 '14 at 8:20

I like to use Hashtable here, so that I get JSON object with properties as keys and errors as value in form of string array.

var errors = new Hashtable();
foreach (var pair in ModelState)
{
    if (pair.Value.Errors.Count > 0)
    {
        errors[pair.Key] = pair.Value.Errors.Select(error => error.ErrorMessage).ToList();
    }
}
return Json(new { success = false, errors });

This way you get following response:

{
   "success":false,
   "errors":{
      "Phone":[
         "The Phone field is required."
      ]
   }
}
share|improve this answer

@JK it helped me a lot but why not:

 public class ErrorDetail {

        public string fieldName = "";
        public string[] messageList = null;
 }

        if (!modelState.IsValid)
        {
            var errorListAux = (from m in modelState 
                     where m.Value.Errors.Count() > 0 
                     select
                        new ErrorDetail
                        { 
                                fieldName = m.Key, 
                                errorList = (from msg in m.Value.Errors 
                                             select msg.ErrorMessage).ToArray() 
                        })
                     .AsEnumerable()
                     .ToDictionary(v => v.fieldName, v => v);
            return errorListAux;
        }
share|improve this answer

ToDictionary is an Enumerable extension found in System.Linq packaged in the System.Web.Extensions dll http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.linq.enumerable.todictionary.aspx. Here's what the complete class looks like for me.

using System.Collections;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System.Linq;

namespace MyNamespace
{
    public static class ModelStateExtensions
    {
        public static IEnumerable Errors(this ModelStateDictionary modelState)
        {
            if (!modelState.IsValid)
            {
                return modelState.ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key,
                    kvp => kvp.Value.Errors.Select(e => e.ErrorMessage).ToArray()).Where(m => m.Value.Count() > 0);
            }
            return null;
        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer

Variation with return type instead of returning IEnumerable

public static class ModelStateHelper
{
    public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string[]>> Errors(this ModelStateDictionary modelState)
    {
        if (!modelState.IsValid)
        {
            return modelState
                .ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value.Errors.Select(e => e.ErrorMessage).ToArray())
                .Where(m => m.Value.Any());
        }

        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There are lots of different ways to do this that all work. Here is now I do it...

if (ModelState.IsValid)
{
    return Json("Success");
}
else
{
    return Json(ModelState.Values.SelectMany(x => x.Errors));
}
share|improve this answer

Why not return the original ModelState object to the client, and then use jQuery to read the values. To me it looks much simpler, and uses the common data structure (.net's ModelState)

to return the ModelState as Json, simply pass it to Json class constructor (works with ANY object)

C#:

return Json(ModelState);

js:

        var message = "";
        if (e.response.length > 0) {
            $.each(e.response, function(i, fieldItem) {
                $.each(fieldItem.Value.Errors, function(j, errItem) {
                    message += errItem.ErrorMessage;
                });
                message += "\n";
            });
            alert(message);
        }
share|improve this answer

The easiest way to do this is to just return a BadRequest with the ModelState itself:

For example on a PUT:

[HttpPut]
public async Task<IHttpActionResult> UpdateAsync(Update update)
{
    if (!ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        return BadRequest(ModelState);
    }

    // perform the update

    return StatusCode(HttpStatusCode.NoContent);
}

If we use data annotations on e.g. a mobile number, like this, in the Update class:

public class Update {
    [StringLength(22, MinimumLength = 8)]
    [RegularExpression(@"^\d{8}$|^00\d{6,20}$|^\+\d{6,20}$")]
    public string MobileNumber { get; set; }
}

This will return the following on an invalid request:

{
  "Message": "The request is invalid.",
  "ModelState": {
    "update.MobileNumber": [
      "The field MobileNumber must match the regular expression '^\\d{8}$|^00\\d{6,20}$|^\\+\\d{6,20}$'.",
      "The field MobileNumber must be a string with a minimum length of 8 and a maximum length of 22."
    ]
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Take a look at System.Web.Http.Results.OkNegotiatedContentResult.

It converts whatever you throw into it to JSON.

So I did this

var errorList = ModelState.ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key.Replace("model.", ""), kvp => kvp.Value.Errors[0].ErrorMessage);

return Ok(errorList);

This resulted in:

{
  "Email":"The Email field is not a valid e-mail address."
}

I am yet to check what happens when there is more than one error for each field but the point is the OkNegoriatedContentResult is brilliant!

Got the linq/lambda idea from @SLaks

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